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Dogs In Cars

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by NoobieDogOwner, Jul 4, 2021.


  1. NoobieDogOwner

    NoobieDogOwner PetForums Newbie

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    We've just recently bought a Whippet puppy and as we'll be going on holiday to Wales in late August I'm wondering what the best way to travel with them is? We have 3 kids so it's own seat/seat belt is a no go. I've seen sloped cages that fit into a car boot but just wondering if the cage (and/or the dog) needs to be secured somehow?

    Any recommendations appreciated as it's a bit of a minefield for a newbie like myself.
     
  2. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Safest way is 100% a crate. Whether it needs to be secured depends on the size of the crate really. You could use cable ties or bungee cords to attach to the luggage loops. You also want to make sure pup is crate trained so they feel happy in the crate, so start feeding them in there and going on short rides as soon as you can.
     
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  3. NoobieDogOwner

    NoobieDogOwner PetForums Newbie

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    I've seen loads of dogs jumping out of crates in boots but when I went to Pets At Home they kept telling me they're not safe and the dog needs to wear a seat belt as its law. Mentioned a crate a few times but they either weren't interested or have been told to discourage people from buying them. He's getting much better in his crate and give him treats for getting in so hopefully the transition to car will be a smooth one
     
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  4. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    If a crate is shut how is the dog jumping out?? A seatbelt attachment is way more likely to fail, or the dog chew through it. By law a dog needs to be secured in the car and not cause distraction to the driver. Doesn't matter how the dog is secured as long as it is. My dogs are large and they are in the boot with a dog guard, but I ideally would have crates in there. Crates also mean if you stop you can open the boot and let some air in without the dog escaping.
    I think if you had a small dog than a seatbelt would be OK, but anything bigger than a terrier I'd not be happy with the safety.
     
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  5. NoobieDogOwner

    NoobieDogOwner PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry, should have elaborated what I meant about dogs jumping out of crates, I meant I've noticed dogs being let out of crates and car boots by their owners to get out for a walk. So would a guard class as keeping the dog secure? By secure does the law mean that the dog cant get to the driver as you say?

    I knew a cat would be easier
     
    Sarah H likes this.
  6. Pricivius

    Pricivius PetForums Member

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    I have a crate in the boot. It came with straps to anchor it. It is crash tested so if I am rear-ended, the crate should not crumple. There is also an exit at the back so I can get the dog out by lowering the back seats if I ever need to. I can open the boot and give him air without him jumping out. He happily jumps in - i have to hold him back until I’ve opened it fully - and he clearly feels comfy and secure in there. It’s reassuring to know he’s safe back there. I am a big crate advocate, although we now have no boot space!
     
  7. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    As far as I know there is no law about how a dog is kept restrained in a car or even that they have to be at all. If a loose dog were to distract the driver and cause an accident you would be liable just as you would be if you were eating or turning round to speak to your kids that were distracting you.
     
  8. Emlar

    Emlar PetForums Member

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    Yeah, I dont think there is a specific law about it.

    But a quick Google found it in the highway code - Rule 57 of the highway code states: “When in a vehicle make sure dogs or other animals are suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you, or themselves if you stop quickly. A seat belt harness, pet carrier, dog cage or dog guard are ways of restraining animals in cars.”

    We have a seat belt thing that plugs in and attaches to his harness. Although I am looking for something different as there have been a couple of occasions where hes sat on the seat belt plug and managed to unbuckle himself!
     
  9. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    I think you're right that it's highway code rather than law (I have a feeling this has been discussed before...). But it means that if you are in an accident and the dog was loose your insurance might not pay out, as well as the fact you could be pulled over and fined and given points by the police.
     
  10. Leanne77

    Leanne77 PetForums VIP

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    You can get fined for not having your dog suitably restrained in the car, I know somebody who was pulled by the police.

    I dont know where Pets At Home got their info from but a crate is a safe way to secure the dog, and satisfies the requirements.
     
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  11. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    Hello and Welcome to PF

    The crate will depend on your car, it a saloon or estate or hatch and how much luggage you are taking.
     
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