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Dogs and cats and other questions

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by IzzyTwig, Nov 20, 2012.


  1. IzzyTwig

    IzzyTwig PetForums Senior

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    I'm debating getting a dog, I currently have 3 cats and live in a decent sized 4 bedroom house with a garden.
    My partner and I have been looking at german shepherds and huskies as they're breeds we absolutely adore.
    However we're worried about how a dog (or two) would interact with the cats. We'd separate the animals whilst we're out during the day (out no longer than about 4-5 hours usually due to different shifts) but leave them together whilst we're in. Or would it be possible to leave them all together whilst we're out so that they have a bigger run of the house?

    I've always grown up with dogs and desperately miss dog ownership, twice daily walks, playing and the companionship etc. (I've tried walking the cats it doesn't work lol.) We've had dogs from puppies and also from rescue.

    With regards to the cats is it best to get a puppy so could learn to respect cats or rescue an older dog with a history of being with cats?

    And finally, 1 dog or two? I'm aware 2 dogs might overwhelm the cats, but having seen the companionship between animals especially dogs I'd love to get 2, though I'm also worried we don't have the space as we're looking at big breeds of dog. For owners with 2 dogs or more do you have big houses and gardens or just rely on frequent walking?

    Sorry for all the questions, I'd be very grateful for any answers :)
     
  2. Reverie

    Reverie PetForums VIP

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    One thing I would say is that I'd be wary of huskies and cats, it can work but it may also not. Huskies typically have a very high prey drive so you would have to be very careful, and not leave them all together unless you absolutely trusted the dog 100%

    I'd also only get one to start with, unless maybe rehoming two older dogs, because puppies are sooo much work and they need one on one time, again, this is not set in stone either, some can make it work. :p
     
  3. Leam1307

    Leam1307 PetForums Senior

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    deleted ....
     
    #3 Leam1307, Nov 20, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  4. Luz

    Luz PetForums VIP

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    This is only my opinion/experience.
    It seems that GSDs can get on fine with cats, Huskies not so because of reasons already stated. If I was getting a pup, I would want one that is already used to cats or, as you said, an older dog. Personally I wouldn't get 2 straight away as they might 'gang up' on the cats. You can always add another dog further down the line.
     
  5. Rylee

    Rylee PetForums Member

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    I have got a puppy, who i have had about 7 weeks now and getting on with my cat was one of my biggest concerns before getting her. I had the opinion that a puppy would grow up with the cat and this would be a far better way to go than getting an older dog but what i didn't take into account was a puppy wants to play! constantly!!!

    I have to say they are getting much better together as the weeks go on and i know it will all work out fine but in hindsight i think a slightly older dog, as long as it was cat friendly, would have got on immediately with my cat because the crazyness of the puppy initially put my cat off. She is coming round now though and seems to want to spend a lot of time near the puppy.

    If you do get a puppy just realise it can be a lot of work getting them to respect the cats, although my cat is a push over so hasn't helped herself, if your cats will put the dog in it's place if they get to much, it will be easier. Saying this though i have a terrier and they are just mad anyway lol
     
  6. GummyMarmite

    GummyMarmite PetForums Junior

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    From personal experience I would suggest that you also make upstairs a cat only area, they can then retreat up there when they are feeling vulnerable and invariably sulk.... ours sulked for about 3 weeks! They soon get over it and will come down as the lure of a warm lap is usually too much for them to be in self imposed exile for long!
     
  7. sophieanne93

    sophieanne93 PetForums Member

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    I have a husky and a malamute who both have very high prey drives. My mal has only met my two cats and has learnt from a swipe on the nose not to bother them from 7 weeks old. Demon was bought up with cats from the day he was born as his breeder has cats and again is learning to recognise hissing from the cats as a sign to back off and leave them alone. Both dogs normally ignore the cats. Huskies bought up with cats can work wonders as I have seen in my experience, not all will be the same but its just one of those things that either works or it doesn't. We keep upstairs off limits to the dogs except at night when the cats are out.
     
  8. dexter12

    dexter12 PetForums Senior

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    i have 5 cats and in our family their is 3 dogs. a rottweiler, Bullmastiff & dogue de bordeaux all get along brilliantly with the cats :) we got all the dogs as puppies so they grew up with the cats
     
  9. Catz1

    Catz1 PetForums VIP

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    I have a GSD and a cat, Rio was here first and 2 years old before I brought Ike the kitten home.

    Both get on brilliantly and as long as Rio has had her walk she completely leaves Ike alone. Ike on the other hand considers Rio to be his mammy and pesters her constantly :rolleyes:

    [​IMG]

    Keep in mind that a GSD puppy can be VERY mouthy, they are nicknamed landsharks so this might seriously upset your cats. Its best to keep any puppy tethered to you at all times until they learn to respect the current pets.

    I think as long as you have a lot of time and patience for slow introductions then a GSD might suit your needs but be sure to check that you can provide enough exercise and stimulation for one. ;)
     
  10. IzzyTwig

    IzzyTwig PetForums Senior

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    Thanks for all the replies guys :)

    I'm planning on twice daily walks, daily playing in the garden and a run 3 or 4 times a week with whatever dog or dogs I may get. So I'm hoping this will be enough to keep up with the exercise needs of a GSD or Siberian Husky.

    We spied a GSD that sounded perfect for us at our local rescue who was used to cats, but alas he has been rehomed already. So we'll keep on looking for a slightly older dog used to cats, if not we'll go on a puppy hunt from a breeder with cats.

    The cats are still young themselves so love to play and are quite assertive and quick to bosh each other (and us) on the head if something isn't going their way so hopefully they can teach any puppy not to play too hard. The suggestion of keeping the cats upstairs and dogs downstairs sounds like a really good idea.

    I'm glad to know my plans are feasible though.
    Love the picture of Rio and Ike. :)
     
  11. jenny armour

    jenny armour PetForums VIP

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    i have the same problem as i have 11 cats altogether. when i approached a breeder for future reference i was asked if i would prefer a young adult. fortunately the breeders dogs are used to her cats and are brought up with them. so i am considering maybe getting a young adult whent the times comes. you can always try a breeder in case they are looking for homes for young adults
     
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