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Doggy Fostering

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by xxsarahpopsxx, Apr 6, 2011.


  1. xxsarahpopsxx

    xxsarahpopsxx PetForums VIP

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    Does anyone have any information on it. ie what are the usual processes etc - its easy enough to google but would prefer some personal experiences about each individual rescues etc

    As some of you may know, we are planning on getting another dog once we have moved house in the summer, and i have always been intrigued by fostering. However, i never mentioned it to my Oh as i didnt think he would be too keen on dogs of different breeds and sizes coming and going. However last night we were discussing getting another dog and he was like - is there not some sort of like doggy fostering thing you can do? He says he would love to have different dogs with different challenges and see them progress and find new homes. :eek: instead of just spoiling a specific dog with our love and affection (this coming from a guy who grew up never having pets and hating dogs, to seeing how much fulfillment they give - my job here is done :D )


    So come on then, how did you get into it etc and what are the good things and also the bad things as i want to know what we will be letting ourselves into. I know i will find it hard and will become attached to every single dog but i will manage (or i will just keep them all :p )
     
  2. lucysnewmum

    lucysnewmum PetForums Senior

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    i regularly foster for one of my local independant rescues....all their dogs are fostered out so that we can assess their behaviour etc in a normal home setting.

    fostering is a very worthwhile thing to do but you must research thoroughly before deciding on which rescue you would like to help.

    things to ask the rescue.....

    do they have a 24hr contact line for you
    do they pay transportation and food costs for the dog
    do you have to have your own insurance to look after the dog incase of bites or injury to 3rd parties
    do you get a choice of which animal you would like to foster
    can your dog meet the potential foster dog on neutral territory prior to fostering
    is anything known of the dog's history and how much of it is believed to be true (sorry but people do lie when handing dogs in for rehoming)

    things to ask yourself.....

    do you have the time and committment to take on another dog?
    do you have the training knowledge to deal with a stressed/abused dog?
    what space do you have in your home?
    could you deal safely with aggression issues if they arose?
    could you deal with housetraining and anxiety issues?
    could you deal with fear or obsessive behaviour?
    could you deal with an ill dog?

    sometimes, if you are lucky, a rescue dog will come into your home, settle right in and become part of your family for a brief time before it is rehomed. others may take months of hard work to rehabilitate them/retrain them into loving pets suitable for rehoming.
    others, sadly, may prove too difficult for even the best of behaviourists to sort out, and have to be put down....how would you cope?


    this is not an exhaustive list....just things to get you thinking things through thoroughly.

    if after a great deal of thought you decide to go ahead....good luck to you.
    you will find it difficult to let your fosters go....but elating all the same that they have found wonderful new homes. if you are lucky, as i have been, you will also make some lifelong friends for yourself and be able to keep in touch with your babies!
    :D
     
  3. Starlite

    Starlite PetForums VIP

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    ask me in about 8mths when I apply :)
     
  4. CarrieH

    CarrieH PetForums Member

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    Never been able to foster myself due to living in rented accommodation, but Lurcher Link uses fosterers nationwide. LL also seems to have had quite a few fosterers who get far too attached to their dogs and just can't bear the thought of them being rehomed anywhere else :D
     
  5. xxsarahpopsxx

    xxsarahpopsxx PetForums VIP

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    thanks for that lucy'snewmum we have thought of most of those things and feel that we should be able to deal with most, if not all of them.

    The ones that we have came across is obviously many tears, this one Home and ofcourse any local rescues near wherever we are living next year :)
     
  6. Milliepoochie

    Milliepoochie PetForums VIP

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    Didnt want to read and run. I got as far as the lady form Wood Green phoning to book a home visit for me for this weekend. I had to sheepishly explain that since filling out the application my situation had changed and we had gained another dog. She wa spolite enough but after I came off the phone I felt like a right numpty! :blink:

    I failed before I had even begun :)

    Best of luck, sounds incredibly rewarding :)
     
  7. Johnderondon

    Johnderondon PetForums VIP

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    Fostering is a tremendously rewarding and educational experience. Most rescues will match fosterer's abilities to their dogs in much the same way they screen adoptions so you shouldn't be overwhelmed with hard-core abuse cases straight off. lol.

    MT are an excellent rescue (I have an MT dog). I wouldn't hesitate to foster for them.
     
  8. xxsarahpopsxx

    xxsarahpopsxx PetForums VIP

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    Thanks thats great to know, i presumed they would want to get to know you before giving you the really hard cases. Also, is the same in respect to adoption for the housing situation ie does the garden need to have a 6 foot fence?

    We will be moving house before we can even think about fostering so if i know all of the housing requirements then when we are house searching i can fit these in aswell :p
     
  9. Snuggles

    Snuggles PetForums Senior

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    This. :D Don't be scared to ask the rescue about expenses, support and the general process. If possible, speak to other people who foster for the rescue and see if they they are happy with the support they recieve.

    There are some fantastic rescues out there but there are also some that aren't so great. I learnt a hard life lesson when fostering for a one man band a few years ago.

    All seemed to be going great until a litter of pups that were here all came down with severe gastroenteritis and dropped one by one. We lost 6 out of the 7 and ran up a £1500 vet bill in the process.

    I settled up with my vet because it was the right thing to do and not fair on them to be chasing an outstanding bill.

    Despite promises of fundraising to cover the bill, nothing ever materialised and I ended up drawing a line under the whole thing. Money aside, the hardest part was having to cope with 6 deaths in quick succession and a complete lack of emotional support from the person in question who was more concerned with pointing the finger of blame in the vets direction.

    Lesson learnt. :) That said, if I found myself in that situation again with poorly pups in my care, I wouldn't do anything differently.

    I've not let one bad apple put me off and on the other side of the coin, fostered for some fantastic rescues who have been there through thick and thin. I've not personally fostered for Many Tears but know plenty who have and have heard nothing but positive feedback so it would probably be a good rescue to start with.

    Different rescues will vary but for most, you will have a homecheck as you would if you were adopting a dog to ensure it is a safe/secure environment for any dogs placed there. I've never had any problems with 5 ft fences but each one sets their own criteria and some do require 6ft minimum.

    Good luck and keep us posted with how you get on. :)
     
  10. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    Where abouts do you live? X

    Rescue remedies are always looking for fosterers x
     
  11. thedogsmother

    thedogsmother PetForums VIP

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    Well done for considering it, Ive only ever fostered once and failed miserably :eek:
     
  12. holly1

    holly1 PetForums VIP

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    I have a dog from The little dog rescue.
    He is very ill,so cant be a regular foster dog.
    He is a life time sponsor dog,the rescue pay for all his vets bills,and medication for his heart murmur.
    He will stay with us until he dies.
    Some rescues are stricter than others.
    Some wont allow you to work,you have to be at home alot.
    Fence height will limit the dog breeds you can have too.
    I recommend it. Its a lovely thing to do for these dogs.We cant change the world,but we can change one dogs world:D
     
  13. xxsarahpopsxx

    xxsarahpopsxx PetForums VIP

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    I am in edinburgh at the moment but after the summer could be anywhere in scotland :eek:
     
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