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Dog weeing in the night

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by ALC, Apr 27, 2019.


  1. ALC

    ALC PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I had my 2 year old chihuahua for nearly 2 months, after buying him from his previous owners. When we first got him he had quite a few accidents in the house (but that was to be expected after such a big change). We have managed to train him to go to the toilet outside (as the dog at the previous household let their dogs go to the toilet in the house on puppy training pads). However we've had problems with him weeing on a night and I'm stuck on what to do to solve this.
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    What's your dogs sleeping arrangements?
     
  3. ALC

    ALC PetForums Newbie

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    He sleeps in our kitchen in his bed.
     
  4. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    There could be three reasons why he's toileting at night

    The first one being as puppy pads were used in his previous home he never learnt the ability to hold and work his sphincter muscle. It might be as toilet training was really starting from scratching you might have to get up in the night encourage him to toilet then back to bed.

    Secondly, he could be scent marking or urnating if you haven't cleaned up the urine with something that's specific to breaking down urine with enzymes in. The whole kitchen to his sensitive nose smells like a toilet per se and they can remark in the same place or area.

    Third would be he's not actually confident and happy to be left alone over night. He's had other dogs I take it with him in the past so to actually be on his own is a massive step. When he first came to you did he seem to settle easily downstairs? If not what did you do? Not that it matters sometimes the only sign of upset is toileting.

    Personally I think it could actually be a mixture of all 3 to some extent.
     
    Lurcherlad and Twiggy like this.
  5. ALC

    ALC PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your reply, when he was first with us he didn't seem to have any problems sleeping in the kitchen, but cry when we were all in bed, but he doesn't cry anynore.
     
  6. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Often dogs cry initially in situations like this due to being scared and anxious. It's usually better to have dogs close by especially new additions to offer reassurance that everything is ok.
    If dogs initially cry then stop doesn't mean they are less anxious or scared and that they are fine. It often means they have just learnt their is no point in crying it's futile.

    You could if possible sleep close to him give him reassurance. Just so he knows it's ok, and then slowly move back to your own bed or him out the bedroom. It's often advised with puppies and doesn't make a dog more reliant on you but makes a dog realise that you are there for them. Letting them gain confidence bit by bit.

    Make sure you clean your kitchen area where he is urinating with something like simple solution or use biological washing powder/liquid, make a solution of it and use it on the floor to clean. The trick is to give it time to work and not say squirt from the bottle and wipe away.

    Getting up in the early hours may help too, but if you have your dog close to you as a general rule you usually hear them stir. Take outside, praise and back to bed.

    Keep up the toilet training in the day. Try to refrain from leaving free access to the outside which means no doors open in hot weather sounds a pain but giving opportunity and if you see any signs of your dog wanting to toilet. Having a barrier, such as the door encourages dogs to hold. As a general rule dogs happily trot out in the garden from a young age to toilet. However, dogs don't see the difference between garden and house. It's all one big area they live in. The garden is furthest away from home comforts so hence why dogs prefer to toilet there. However free access doesn't give opportunity to hold and so when days become shorter and colder and no free access, then they toilet in the house.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  7. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    I’d have him close by at night so he’s not anxious.

    If he needs to go out you’ll hear him stir so can get him outside before accidents.

    Maybe try a toilet break during the night anyway and gradually move the time in order to retain his bladder.
     
    Burrowzig likes this.
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