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Dog Teeth, in relation to age?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Sarahnorris, May 22, 2010.


  1. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    as you might know Zeke has came and we took photos today, one of them:

    [​IMG]


    we were told he was 14months aprox, but somebody posted saying he could be as old as 2 or 3 years? because of the state of his teeth..

    how do you basically work out how old you dog is by his teeth..
    iv googled it but not much use really, i know the vets can give you a good idea, but i wanted to know if i could sorta work it out myself or if anybody has a rough idea by the photo there, and the other ones that iv posted.
     
  2. SpringerHusky

    SpringerHusky PetForums VIP

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    Teeth look better than Maya's but i'd say he looks to be about 2ish rather than younger, he has an adult look to him rather than a young puppy.

    It can be hard to tell because also depends on the care of the dog's teeth, Maya's teeth make her appear older than she is because she's missing on tooth, some of them are chipped slightly and others in bad condition.
     
  3. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    well i thought maybe because hes a rescue ect that his teeth are in poor condition as a result.. but i dunno.. yeah, deffo looks more 18 months i would of thought +
     
  4. MerlinsMum

    MerlinsMum PetForums VIP

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    It does take time for tartar to build up like that but you don't know how he was fed beforehand. A better guess would be from looking at his front teeth - you can judge age from the wear on the incisors (nibbly ones in front). Though should also say wear on teeth can be a genetic thing as well, some wear down faster, but the shape of the nibblies is a good clue.
     
  5. tafwoc

    tafwoc PetForums VIP

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    I think it depends on the dog, Sophie is 9 now and her teeth look about 2-3years (she's always munching on rawhide so they stay really clean. Where as Riley has to have her teeth regularly cleaned as she doesn't eat things that help keep them clean. So i think it totally depends. I would say he looks about 2 though.
     
  6. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    dunno if ill risk looking at his front teeth after OHs lovely encounter, :lol: but can you get them cleaned then? get all that tartar off?
     
  7. MerlinsMum

    MerlinsMum PetForums VIP

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    They might clean up really well after a good meaty bone or few (try lamb or pork ribs, as they are soft enough for a dog to crunch them & eat using those stained back teeth... they don't splinter). Or see how he is with rawhide - but bear in mind some dogs aren't good with rawhide, especially if they aren't used t it which can lead to bits getting stuck.

    Maybe try cleaning them with a dog toothbrush...? Not something I've ever tried though.

    Thorough cleaning is done under a general anaesthetic, not something to be undertaken lightly, though if he had to be put under GA for something else you could request it at the same time.
     
  8. Sarahnorris

    Sarahnorris Banned

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    i wonder if the vets would do it, will look into it. i want him to look good in his new home! ;)
     
  9. 2Hounds

    2Hounds PetForums VIP

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    Yes you can get dental's done at the vets but it does require a GA so it has associated risks and not cheap, Throp's cost me £130 last year when he needed a broken tooth removed.

    You can get logic toothpaste that will work to a degree without brushing but i wouldn't try sticking fingers in mouths until you've built up some trust, there is stuff you can add to water too to help prevent the build up. I'm sure some chews would help give them a scrub, hopefully they are just dirty rather than any rotten ones.
     
  10. Nicky10

    Nicky10 PetForums VIP

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    The vet could clean them but raw bones are the best way I've found. I'd rather do that than have a dog under GA as the vet would have to do. Maybe if he's going in to be neutered or something the vet could do it at the same time
     
  11. Colette

    Colette PetForums VIP

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    Plaque Off may also be worth a try - just add it to their food.
     
  12. sketch

    sketch PetForums VIP

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    I give mine bones Sarah, if you want to compare, here is Kane and Dalton, Kane is now 18 months Dalton is 20 months so similar age to what you were told Zeke was hunny, hope it helps, but obviously we dont know what Zeke's past was regards care etc.
    Hope it helps

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    xx
     
  13. Mum2Heidi

    Mum2Heidi PetForums VIP

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    I thought he looked more adolescent than pup - but what do I know :lol::thumbup:

    Was thinking about the raw chicken wings Heidi has that keep her teeth clean and wondered about Turkey wings?? They are a bit bigger and all the sinew strands etc would give him a good old floss - that or the leg. Turkey legs have loads of leaders etc. that would get in all the gaps.

    I have fallen in love with your new man :lol:
     
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