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Dog Studding

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by JamesC1459, Mar 6, 2017.


  1. JamesC1459

    JamesC1459 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi there,

    I'm sure you get quite a few of these questions raised in here but I'd thought I'd drop a line and hope for some help.

    My wife and I are proud owners of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and we are considering putting him out to stud.

    We both love dogs and the next stage (years down the line) would be to have a bitch and have a litter of our own, before doing so we have a hell of a lot to learn and thought a good place to start would be from a somewhat lesser side of responsibility, having a stud. We have both done a lot of research and have primarily read 'it's best left to people who know what they are doing'. Well everyone has to learn at some point!

    Where is the best place to learn/read/understand how to go about putting our guy out to stud? We appreciate he isn't a show dog/working dog etc but he is pedigree and has a history of breeding in his family. We want to avoid any of the pitfalls and mistakes that might be made and do everything in the correct manner.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated but please don't reply with one liners with no explanation or reasoning. :)

    Many Thanks!

    James
     
  2. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    How old is your dog?

    My Sister bred and showed Cavaliers for a number of years and because heart problems are so prevalent in the Breed, males are not normally used at stud until they're six years old and, obviously, with no heart problems.
     
  3. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    The "right" way to get in to the world of breeding would be to start by getting involved in the dog world :)
    Go to shows, volunteer to steward shows, join the parent club of your breed, go to breed club meetings, meet breeders also involved in the breed, go to seminars on health, conformation, breeding practices - these are usually sponsored by the breed club.
    Volunteer at a breed rescue, spend time transporting dogs, fostering dogs if possible, learn how to do home checks.
    Go to performance events, volunteer as a scorekeeper, timekeeper, ring steward, learn about the sports that your breed is involved in.

    All of this adds up to experience, knowledge and networking that you can then call on if/when you decide to breed yourself.
     
  4. Dogloverlou

    Dogloverlou PetForums VIP

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    The Cavalier is sadly a breed predisposed to quite a few genetic health issues. Health testing is of paramount importance and those tests are not going to come cheaply, so of course that is something to firstly bear in mind before deciding to take it any further.

    http://www.dogbreedhealth.com/cavalier-king-charles-spaniel/
     
  5. leashedForLife

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    hmm... Dog studding.
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  6. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Administrator
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    I must admit that was the sort of vision I had in mind !
     
    leashedForLife likes this.
  7. Freyja

    Freyja PetForums VIP

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    I'm sorry but owning the stud does not mean you have less responsibility for the pups. The studs owner is just as responsible for the pups as the owner of the bitch after all it takes two
     
  8. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    I adore Cavaliers. We have three. And another three are owned by family members. However, I would advise learning all about Cavaliers before you consider whether you have a dog that would suitable to use as a stud. They are an amazing breed that were badly let down by both the KC and by suposedly 'good' breeders who should have known better. I don't think they are always well represented by the KC either ..I await their Crufts Best in Breed with baited breath.

    Having a dog whose genes you consider worthy of passing on comes with responsibility. Health tests (and there are plenty) are just one of the many factors. But even more important in Cavaliers in my opinion is the actual health and wellbeing of your dog and that of his parents (and grandparents if possible). Health tests only show you so much. Does he snore? Or snuffle. Or backward sneeze? Can he run (and I mean run). What age was his mother when she gave birth to him and are both parents still clear of heart murmur. All these factors are important if you are going to pass on his genes.

    If you can answer in the positive to these questions ...then maybe your little man might be on the way to being a possible stud.

    Then you have to learn all about studding ...... and there is plenty to learn .....have a peep the Cavalier Club link above which gives you their code of ethics.

    J
     
  9. tabulahrasa

    tabulahrasa PetForums VIP

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    This isn't particularly helpful, but I feel the need to point out that every single dog has a history of breeding in the family...or they wouldn't exist...
     
    leashedForLife likes this.
  10. leashedForLife

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    QUOTE, tabulahrasa:

    ... every single dog has a history of breeding in the family... or they wouldn't exist...

    /QUOTE
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    thank U, Captain Obvious - *harrumph, harrumph*... I quite missed that, good show! :oops: -- very well done, yes... Errrmm, as mammals don't reproduce by cloning, nor do they bud, nor reproduce asexually as some lizards can, or as sometimes happens in poultry, yes - all dogs have a 'history of breeding in their family', as they've all got
    parents - Two of 'em. :rolleyes:
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    How *well* any given dog was bred - planned for, selected, screened, temp, type, compensations for any lacks in the other gender [structure & other basics are sound, but no dog is perfect - minor cosmetic flaws, & so on], that's a whole other topic.
    Prospective sires or dams must both be tested - which might be DNA screening, radiographs, functional tests [drawer test for a potential slipping patella?...], evaluation for type by a breed judge or experienced breeder, etc, etc.
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