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Dog Pulling with no hope

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Cj813, May 20, 2019.


  1. Cj813

    Cj813 PetForums Newbie

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    Hello,

    My 11 month old Parsons Russell will pulls on the lead - we have him on a harness and have tried both front and back attachments.

    We’ve been trying to do the tree tactic standing dead still until he takes a step back or looks back at you and lossens the lead and then continue walking (also tried the version when you turn your back on him) and then rewarding him when he walks along side us.

    Thing is if he is in a pulling mood it just doesn’t work, at times when we’ve stopped as he is pulling he has continued to pull at the lead for 10-20 minutes sometimes he’ll continues keeping the lead tight for 30-40 minutes with no sense of giving in. The times he does loosen the lead we’ll go 5 steps and then it starts all over again.

    He will do it on new routes or he’s usual route - non consistent!

    Behaviourly he has no other concerns, he has plenty of play things, loads of play time, goes to daycare - there just no consistency it just depends on his mood!

    Help - i’m now in physio for the strain it’s caused on my shoulder
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    This video might help you. You might also find a walking belt helpful to take the strain off your shoulders.
     
    #2 JoanneF, May 20, 2019
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  3. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    Loose lead walking is not an easy thing to teach IMO, there are so many factors to take in to consideration for this & at times it is all too much for the dog to understand what is required.

    IME I have found it easier to look at it as an exercise I would teach as I would anything else such a sit or down. At present it sounds as if you have a dog who is young, excitable & doesn't really understand what you want him to do so I would start from scratch again. Decide when & where you are going to teach this exercise (not when he is very excitable & wants to get going but when he is calmer & there are less distractions), how you are going to do this & what to reinforce.

    I would get him a harness for when you don't mind how he walks & you can get out & about, play with him, let him explore, etc without the frustration of teaching LLW .... which it can be for both dog & owner at times!

    If you struggle then maybe invest in a walking belt, these are fantastic & mean you can go out without worrying too much about being pulled over. I have back issues & these are great for me when walking my dogs when they have to be on lead.

    Then, when you want to teach LLW make it when he has had plenty of exercise (but not too tired or hyped up!)& attach the lead to his collar & have a couple of short (but successful) sessions of teaching him what you want. the above clip by Kikopup is a great start,

    I think, at times, we expect too much from our dogs especially when they are young & excitable. He probably feels frustrated during these times & if he is then he's probably not learning much. Sometimes LLW seems to be something we have to constantly work on (I do with my younger dog) but make sure you are very clear with your criteria.
     
    #3 Cleo38, May 20, 2019
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  4. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    There's no need for you to hold the lead in your hand and therefore get shoulder strain. A walking belt would take all the effort out of it. I walk 3 collies on mine. If they pull, you just plant your feet and lean back. Being attached to your waist, the centre of gravity is much lower so it's a doddle. It also leaves your hands free to use treats to keep the dog in place, or get dinner from the chippy and eat it while you walk the dog.
    You can buy walking belts, or I made mine from the bottom part of an old rucsac. For a smaller dog like yours, any decent strong belt could be used. Put the belt through the handle of the lead before doing it up round your waist.
     
    Caribou, Linda Weasel and Lurcherlad like this.
  5. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    What's current thinking on Halti collars? I know some folks use them permanently which I never thought was the idea - the idea being to teach the dog to walk to heal. However, I'm just interested to know what the knowledgeable folks on here think and whether or not it might help CJ813.

    EDIT: I just did some online 'research' and can see there's much more to their use than at first might meet the eye (like many things when it comes to dog training!)
     
    #5 Ian246, May 20, 2019
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
  6. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Personal opinion of course but I don't like Halti collars. I also don't like harnesses. I invest quite a lot of time with my dogs when they are puppies teaching them to walk on a flat collar and lead. Unfortunately, with most pet dogs owners, they seem to wait until their dogs are several months old and are pulling their arms out before tackling the problem.
     
  7. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums VIP

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    I use harnesses on both my dogs - the first one (ex-army) had apparently damaged his neck (we were told) and needed a harnesss rather than collar and lead - but all military dogs use harnesses anyway. That kind of got me into the habit and I feel as if I have more control (ie, I can grab the back of the harness if needs be, to really hold on). As the Sprocker comes hiking with me, he also has a harness; his 'hiking harness' takes small panniers so he can carry his own water, food, etc, but also has a handle which is really useful for lifting him over fences, etc, if necessary (doesn't happen often).
     
    LittleMow likes this.
  8. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Well I did say it personal opinion and of course I wouldn't hesitate to use a harness if it was for medical reasons, such as a neck injury. For long distance walking I prefer a small rucksack for the dog's water etc.
     
  9. Caribou

    Caribou PetForums Member

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    I have never been able to teach Max not to pull. In the end I decided to use it to my advantage and take up canicross.

    For this reason I second what has been said about getting a waist belt and attaching your dog to that. Make sure you get a well padded very wide one so it doesn't dig into your back and side. Canicross belts often have leg straps so the belt sits low down on the hips to keep it in place and to make sure you don't end up bent over when the dog jerks suddenly.

    This is a much more comfortable way of walking your pup in my opinion.

    (I'm not saying don't train your dog not to pull - this is just a suggestion to make your walks more comfortable until you do).
     
  10. Woah

    Woah PetForums Member

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    When you say he continues sometimes to keep the lead tight for 30 to 40 minutes at a time do you mean when you have given up doing the static tree tactic and ‘allowed’ him then to pull on the walk?
    If so then it will undo any work you’ve put it so far (?!) - sorry perhaps I misunderstand - could you elaborate on this?
    My dog would be a big puller (if I let him be). He has HUGE drive and energy and just wants to get going without his silly slow,( in his opinion; I’m quite a quick walker actually) owner slowing him up. I have been doing the tree tactic, and the sit and then walk when I say, and the turn around let’s walk the other way then try again tactic, for months. Does he walk lovely on the lead yet all the time - nope! Is he a terrible puller? - no but he’s still got a long way to go to being near perfect. Will I give up these tactics? - no! Because if I did I’m certain he would very quickly, become a terrible puller, and I can’t take a 25kg dog hauling me along. But for now he’s just 9 months old, a hugely energetic, playful and motivated youngster. recently I came to the realisation that I was asking too much to expect him to walk so perfectly next to me for long bouts, especially when first out the door and in this sense I was kind of setting him up for failure. I reasoned he NEEDS breaks to release his pent up drives, so now I keep the initial on lead bit very short with lots of frequent breaks to “go sniff”, and then use plenty of praise and treats for when he does it right. After a good run off lead he’s back on the lead for the walk home and normally will walk this bit beautifully because he’s had his fun, and he’s able to listen now better and concentrate on the task.
    By the way I also used a halti for a while, and they are great for alleviating pulling but I found it didnt train my dog not to WANT to pull, only prevent him from being ABLE to pull strongly. After a couple of months He ended up getting really frustrated with wearing it constantly rubbing his face against me or along the ground, and I went back to the flat collar.... and so I spend a lot of time tree standing, and I will carry on until he finally learns - unless anyone out there can advise a different way? Watching this thread with interest...!!!
     
    Barkingmad57 likes this.
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