Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Dog messing at night

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by alesspearson, Dec 21, 2018.


  1. alesspearson

    alesspearson PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2018
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all, we have a beautiful 7 month old English Pointer who is currently going through his teenage phase but we are having one particular problem with him that we just don’t know how to fix!
    Until recently, I could count on one hand the amount of times he’d messed in the house, he lets us know he wants to go outside and wakes us up in the morning by gently scratching the dining room door around 5am to go outside, then happily flops back onto his bed to snooze a while longer.
    Over the last week or so, he’s been waking us up around 4/5am to let us know he’s already messed! He gently scratches at the door and when we get downstairs, he’s laid back in his crate looking sheepish with a pile and a puddle waiting for us. He gets walked every night and we don’t allow him to bed until he’s done his business - I just don’t understand why he wakes us up to let us know he’s already messed? How do we tackle this?
    Any help or advice is greatly appreciated! He’s a beautiful boy who sometimes baffles me with how intelligent he is, I just don’t know how to tackle this!
     
  2. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    19,815
    Likes Received:
    18,136
    You need to get him checked over by a vet first - he could well have a medical issue that is affecting his ability to hold overnight or affecting his ability to know when he needs to go.

    If the vet check comes back clear I’d go back to treating him like a little pup - set an alarm and take him out before he usually wakes, and gradually move the time forward.
     
    Torin. and tabelmabel like this.
  3. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    9,486
    Yes - i had a problem a little bit similar to this when my pup was very young. We had her sleep in a crate. It was all going well until one night i was in a very deep sleep and by the time i woke, my pup had already piddled in her crate.

    From that single incident, she never gave any warning she needed to pee when in her crate. She peed - and then barked to let us know!!

    So i set an alarm to go off every 2 hrs right though the night til i reversed the pattern.

    It worked!!

    So, if your vet check is ok you could try setting an alarm and doing what i did.

    Then i lengthened it to every 3 hours, then just once and then not at all. Solved.


    At 7 months, your pup (if there is no health problem) shouldn't need to toilet during the night at all so you can stretch out the time with this alarm clock method and your pup's schedule will change to one more compatible with yours.

    You might want to adjust the times your puppy is fed - or look at what you are feeding- if this doesn't work.
     
  4. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2013
    Messages:
    5,249
    Likes Received:
    9,486
    Ps also with this method, you need to go out with your dog in the night and give praise for poops and pees outdoors. Don't just open your door and let the dog out.
     
  5. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2009
    Messages:
    17,679
    Likes Received:
    11,085
    It could be that his meal time is such that it needs to come out during the night. Put some finely chopped raw carrot in his meal, and it will still be visible when it comes out - do tests over a few days. If his gut transit time (as an easy example) is 12 hours, don't feed him at 4 pm. Adjust feeding times accordingly.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice