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Dog is eating the house

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by kdh, Apr 10, 2009.


  1. kdh

    kdh PetForums Newbie

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    Hello,

    We have a 9 month old Labradoodle (father was a miniature Poodle).

    We have a large house with a big garden. She's excercised every day in the forest for around an hour.

    She gets the run of the large downstairs family room/kitchen.

    She sleeps in a cage happily at night in the boot room.

    When she's been naughty, or when we are cooking, she is put in the boot room, but not the cage. Or in the garden on a long lead. She whines non-stop wherever we put her.

    When she is left alone in the family room, she destroys it. Jumping up on work surfaces, ripping cushions, sofas, anything she can get hold of, even if it's just for a few minutes.

    The dog is craving attention but we can't give dedicate our lives to her. We both work from home and are around all day.

    If we let her into the rest of the house, she will jump up on the sofas (and on us). She likes to lie on top of us wherever we are. We don't want her on the sofas/beds etc.

    So, my question is, how do we stop her getting up on the tables, opening cupboards and eating everything in the room while we are out of it, and how do we stop the whingeing and whining from this very spoilt, hyperactive Madam.

    Thanks in advance for any replies and sorry for the long post.

    Kim
     
  2. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

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    She is very oung to expect to be shut in a room or anywhere when she can hear you around and not able to be with you, if you work at home then presumably she has never been left alone very much.

    Ours have the run of the house the youngest is 8months and my dogs have nevet been allowed on the furniture, it is easier in the long run to allow her to follow you around, be part of the family and train her not to go on furniture,or jump up when cooking.

    When she goes to jump up at you or anything i have always used a command stick to the same command, loudly but not aggressive it could just be a noise you make, anything that the whole family can use this noise aversion will then distract her then praise her with a treat and make a big fuss then when you think she is responding after a while you can move on to just petting her and "good girl"
     
  3. LabWorld

    LabWorld PetForums Junior

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    Hi Kim

    I have a two year old Lab and I really can relate to your story.

    He's fine now but in his first year he was a real handful! The key is exercise and LOTS of it. There really is no substitute for it. Also training. Dogs need something to challenge their minds as well as their bodies. Obviously, your dog is still young so don't overdo the exercise just yet.

    I used to find that if Monty was getting a bit hyper, a quick 10 minute walk around the block would do the trick. I work from home so it's easy, even on a busy day to find the time for a quick walk to top up his two big walks of the day.

    It's a bonus that you have a big garden for your dog to run around in but this just isn't the same as a good walk with the 'pack'.

    Stick with it Kim....things will get easier :)
     
  4. reddogs

    reddogs PetForums Senior

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    Do you take her to any form of formal training? that usually wears them out mentally. Also have you tried giving her one of the interactive toys that are available to play with when you want her to be a bit more peaceful or try a stuffed kong to play with - anything that uses her brain as she obviously has one that needs to be exercised, just a couple of ideas. Other suggestions I have seen is to make her work for their meals by hiding some of it round the garden so she has to search it out
     
  5. kdh

    kdh PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your replies. Kind of you all.

    No formal training, but we've had a trainer round to our house about four times (who was brilliant, but expensive) when she was younger, just to help us with basic puppy stuff.

    I shall try letting her around the house and keeping her off the sofas etc. Other problem is we have a cat, and they hate each other, so we try and keep them apart as well.

    Excercise I know is the key, she hates the wet though, which doesn't help much in this country!

    The stuffed Kong thing only lasts 20 seconds but I guess it's another distraction.

    One more question please, we have sofas in the family room which she is allowed on, but we don't want her on the ones in the our room (while we watch tv etc).

    Should we have one rule for her room and another for ours? Thanks!
     
    #5 kdh, Apr 10, 2009
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2009
  6. kdh

    kdh PetForums Newbie

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  7. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

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    No she cant distinguish which is hers and which is yours it has to be one rule for them all otherwise it will confuse her, i know you said she is crated but you could always put her a bed or blanket in the room that you want her to be in mostly, maybe put a blanket in her crate with her for a night or 2 and then put it in the room, that way it will have her smell and encourage her to take ownership of it. I have a friend who has a labrdoodle hes gorgeous like yours and they are very smart so you'l get there with a little time and patience, good luck keep posting to let us know how u get on.
     
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