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Dog in Hospitals

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by loubyfrog, Aug 21, 2013.


  1. loubyfrog

    loubyfrog PetForums VIP

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    I had my appointment at the outpatient department in the hospital today and when making my appointment for next week there was a elderly-ish couple before me with a dog booking in to be seen.

    I don't think the dog was a therapy dog as it didn't have a coat or harness on stating that it was and it was also very giddy.

    They weren't bringing it to visit a patient as they were in outpatients and they had booked in so they weren't in the wrong place.

    Does anyone find this odd and Bizarre......I love my dog to bits but wouldn't even think about taking him to hospital with me,I was quite bewildered by seeing a dog there....it's the last place I would expect to see one.

    The man behind me thought it was disgraceful and He complained to the reception who looked like they were just as bewildered as me TBH.

    Not sure what happened next as I made my appointment and left.

    So are dogs allowed in hospitals?? I would imagine guide dogs are but not a blooming pet dog.:confused:
     
  2. pogo

    pogo PetForums VIP

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    I believe they are but not for everyone just to bring them in.

    I know that particularly those who are terminal and are staying in hospital that they do tend to allow a visit from their pet dog to you know say bye but like i said they don't allow anyone to walk in with a 'pet' dog at least i don't think!
     
  3. loubyfrog

    loubyfrog PetForums VIP

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    Thats what i thought Pogo.

    Wonder if the hospital staff asked the dog to leave.
    Wish I'd stuck around now to see.
     
  4. pogo

    pogo PetForums VIP

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    does seem very odd at an outpatients though? :confused:
     
  5. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    When I was a midwife we had a blind patient, and explored the practicalities of her guide dog staying on the post-natal ward with her - the dog was pining. However it just wasn't viable with the need for an extra full time carer, access to the room and infection control , sadly. The compromise was an earlier than normal discharge for the patient and daily visits from the dog while she was an in-patient.
    So I would say no, dogs are not allowed in Hospitals apart from extreme circumstances, and very much at the discretion of the staff.
     
  6. foxiesummer

    foxiesummer PetForums VIP

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    Many years ago a customer of mine set fire to her house by smoking in bed. She had a dog and a cat. The dog came to us to be cared for whilst she was in hospital, the cat went missing. The lady was very very poorly and kept asking about the dog and it was agreed that I could take it to see her, she was overjoyed but unfortunately she died a short time later. The cat was found somewhat singed and taken to the vets where his injuries were treated and as non of the ladies relatives wanted it the vet kept it and it lived for many more years. The dog was rehomed with a bus driver who used to see the lady and her dog on his bus every week.
     
  7. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    it does seem very odd :confused:
    therapy dogs are obviously allowed and I've heard of patients having their family dogs come into visit them under special circumstances.
    But I've never heard of a dog going into an out patients appointment :confused:
    Umless someone was particularly anxious and it had been agreed.
     
  8. DirtyGertie

    DirtyGertie PetForums VIP

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    My husband spent his final 10 weeks in our local cottage hospital, it's used only for end of life, recovering from strokes, short stay dementia patients to give partners/carers some respite, etc. It's a very small hospital but it does run a few clinics there to save people going the 50-60 miles to the main hospital, and it has a part-time minor injuries unit and part-time x-ray unit which all use the same entrance as the main ward.

    In the in-patient ward dogs are allowed to visit and I took Poppy almost every time I visited my hubby although he was in a single room. Very comforting for him and helped Poppy too as she got used him not being around gradually.

    I've never seen, and wouldn't expect to see, a dog at a main hospital though. Can't imagine it being allowed or they'd probably get a few turn up most days.
     
  9. Tyton

    Tyton PetForums VIP

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    I would have thought that infection control would block pet dogs attending for hospital appointments, although I do remember in my first job smuggling a rather large GSD 4 floors up in a lift in Aberdeen's Royal Infirmary so he could say goodbye to his dying owner!

    There is also a rather mature GSD that visits my local hospital twice a day, but he sits patiently outside while his elderly owner gets 2 cooked meals a day from the canteen (lives alone and can't/won't cook so comes to the hospital for food and company)
     
  10. emmaviolet

    emmaviolet PetForums VIP

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    When my grandfather was moved to the hospice for end of life care they had a dog for the hospice, which was in the hospital grounds and would wander over to other parts, but I never saw it inside another part. It was in the same grounds as the main hospital. He was a therapy dog of some kind, although he never had a coat or anything on.

    It does sound strange and it is weird with the germs, I am supposing guide and assistance dogs are allowed in a hospital and carry much of the same germs. :confused:
     
  11. Howl

    Howl PetForums VIP

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    My work (elderly care home) is very dog friendly. We have visitors with dogs, PAT therapy and I take mine in too.
    My boss even allowed a workman to bring his dog in while he worked.
    It isnt a hospital but we do have some people in end of life care and who need a lot of input from nursing.
     
  12. loubyfrog

    loubyfrog PetForums VIP

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    Taking a dog in to visit terminally ill patients I can fully understand (it would be one of my wishes I know that for sure) But I would imagine you have to do clear this with the senior staff beforehand....But to just pitch up with a dog at Outpatients baffles me totally.

    I might ask next week when i go what happened...just because I'm Nosey :eek:

    DirtyGertie,So sorry about your Husband... I bet Poppys visits to him meant everything to him and gave him such happiness seeing her every day.
     
  13. ozrex

    ozrex PetForums VIP

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    We had "Aspro" a PAT dog. He roamed the slow-stream recovery unit but not out-patients or the acute bit of the hospital. He wore a vest, too. Occasionally he was naked and roaming the grounds with hospital staff for a bit of a break, where he raised a few eyebrows.
     
  14. tinaK

    tinaK PetForums VIP

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    When I've been in hospital with the bipolar they've allowed clover to visit me for a short time - but that's not a general hospital, so I dunno
     
  15. Freyja

    Freyja PetForums VIP

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    When my dad was taken into the Douglas Macmilan home ealier this year my mum was allowef to take their 2 dogs to visit him. They even stayed over night if my mum stayed too.

    When we went to visit we often saw other visitors with dogs too. I don't know if they had a limit to how many visitor were allowed to have dogs visiit at the same time. Most of the patients were in private rooms and they all had doors leading into the gardens so I suppose they could take dogs in that way if too many visited at the same time.

    I can't see any reason why a dog would be visiting the out patients now unless it was some sort of assistance dog and was just not wearing its coat.
     
  16. Lizz1155

    Lizz1155 PetForums VIP

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    Mark Crislip wrote an interesting article about Animal Therapy and disease vectors in hospitals a few months ago. (He's a doctor of infectious diseases, so he's really not in favour of animals in hospitals. However since his opinions are evidence-based rather than emotion-based, I think it makes interesting reading) : Animal Therapy « Science-Based Medicine

    As anecdote, I've spend over six months as an inpatient in a UK children's hospital - never once have I seen an animal on the premises. Although, to be fair, most children are a bit young for assistance dogs. Pets and PAT dogs were most certainly not allowed, due to the prevalence of very ill and immunosuppressed children.
     
  17. Howl

    Howl PetForums VIP

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    That is sad, I know our works PAT dog is allowed in (UK) hospital mainly for paediatric care even bringing in small agility items and paws to music routines. I haven't managed to read the article but I will tommorow. I would imagine that for the most part dogs do bring with them an allergy risk and hygiene risk but seem to trail in huge families for visits making it difficult to manage infection control.
    I suppose it depends how much the benefit outways the cost too if the patient is happier and less stressed.
    There seems a be an emphasis on quality of life where I work so best practice is sometimes about taking calculated risks if it will help when time if precious.

    I wonder if outpatient was something that was difficult for the patient and the dog has been used as an unusual way to reduce stress for an unpleasant procedure or a compromise.
     
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