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Dog had 'dizzy turn' after exercise

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by SeeCakeEatCake, May 5, 2010.


  1. SeeCakeEatCake

    SeeCakeEatCake PetForums Newbie

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    Earlier today my 8-year-old rescue dog, Danny, had what I can only describe as a 'dizzy turn' following his walk. It was quite warm and muggy and we had been playing 'fetch'. He was panting quite heavily and at one point lay down. Seeing that he was tired, I called a halt to the game and we started to head home and that's when he had his 'turn'. It began when he lifted his front paw, which I checked to make sure there were no cuts - there weren't. Then he started to walk sideways and wobbled against my legs. I kept him still for a minute or two and he seemed to recover. Any idea what this was? Having researched his symptoms they were akin to those of ataxia. Can Ataxia be temporary or is it a permanent condition?

    As far as I know he is otherwise healthy with no underlying medical condition, although he is a couple of kilos overweight.

    Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me. I'm really worried about him :frown:
     
  2. francesandjon

    francesandjon PetForums VIP

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    A doggy equivilent of a near-faint maybe......
     
  3. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Ataxia isnt a condition as such. Its a word used to describe a lack of co-ordination, and is a symptom that can be involved in various illnesses.

    Have you book him into the vets? Could be all manner of things; over heating, dehydration, heart condition.

    Would be best to have a full health check, especially at that age. If he hasnt had one done recently, maybe a full blood test, just to check everything is working as it should be.

    Depending on diagnosis, ataxia may or may not be permanent. Certain neurological condtions can result in a lack of motor functions.
     
  4. dodigna

    dodigna PetForums VIP

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    A friend's dog was struck with heat exhaustion just a few weeks back, it was not a particularly hot day either and she was in woodland and not overexerting particularly, she is a very healthy much younger dog (a lurcher though, so there is more of a tendency) and she ended up on a drip for several days and luckily no kidney failure. Still was quite a freight!

    I would keep an eye on him and make sure he is hydrated well, she gave rehydration salts fairly regularly (a little every 15 minutes) and check his wees for the rest of the day to ensure everything is working well and like Nonnie said I would take advantage of this for a thorough check up.
     
  5. SeeCakeEatCake

    SeeCakeEatCake PetForums Newbie

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    He's due his annual health check and booster this week actually (also our 1st anniversary together) so I will certainly get him checked out.

    Thanks everyone for the useful advice.
     
  6. JessiesGirl

    JessiesGirl PetForums Senior

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    It sounds as though he may have had heat exhaustion. In the future, if you suspect heat exhaustion, take his temperature. If it is over 102F, then he is dangerously overheated and you must immediately get veterinary advice.

    Move the dog to shade or indoors into air conditioning and try to cool him with tepid, not cold, water along his underside. If he won't lay in a shallowly filled tub for this, you can soak towels with tepid water and press them all along his underside, especially along junctures of legs to the body (where this is less hair and ateries go through, so you can more easily cool the dog).

    It's possible that some other health problem caused the problem, but if you were exercising an overweight dog on a warm day, heat exhaustion is certainly possible. Black dogs also get hotter, faster in the sun, so perhaps try to play energetic games in a shaded area if possible on warm days.

    Hope he's OK!
     
  7. leashedForLife

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    i was taught that 100.2 to 102.2 is the dog-normal range -
    because they use panting / evaporation to cool, they have a wider temp-range than humans.

    anything from 102.5 and up is a definite *fever* and / or overheating -
    but 102.2 in a dog who is lying quietly in an air-conditioned room is not normal, either.
    what they are doing and the ambient-temp have to be considered together.

    dogs who go over 103.5 are getting into the seizure-zone.
    this is extremely dangerous; permanent brain or organ injury can occur, even if the dog survives,
    which is not guaranteed. :( dogs in heavy aerobic activity have gone over 104 and lived with intensive care;
    immediate saline drip, cooling body wraps but NOT shocking them, cooling their HEADS to save brain tissue,
    etc.

    hope hes OK,
    --- terry
     
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