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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, new member here. I'm looking for some advice on the best dog for my parents.

They got an elderly Staffie many years ago, who lasted for a few years. Then they got another 3-year-old Staffie, a female, who was really nice and docile, but died recently at about 13.

They are now 68 and 70, and want another dog. They are getting on a bit for the 'boisterousness' of another staffie. But I want them to be active and walk it twice a day which gets them out the house once a day and fit.

Also, my girlfriend and I are expecting a baby soon and my girlfriend finds Staffies a bit much; she's a little scared of them, especially now she is pregnant. I'm used to them, but she is not and sees them as a bit worrying. I understand this; we all know how lovely Staffies are, but to the average person in the street they can look a little fearsome. We will also have a newborn soon, who will become a toddler and a Staffie barrelling around the place knocking everything over is not the best thing.

Its time for a dog thats a little more.....manageable.

Oh, they also have a cat. So nothing that eats cats. The cat and the staffie got on well.

I was going to go to the local Dogs Trust this week and just check that maybe we could go down there as a family and pick something, but I'm asking here so that I can get the best advice for temperament. So, your suggestions please for a dog:

  • good for a couple in their late 60s/early 70s
  • a good companion dog; to sit on the lap in the evening while they watch TV
  • nothing too physically large, but not too small; no annoying little yappy things
  • will keep them active; wants walking, but not excessively high-energy or boisterous
  • friendly and good with kids
  • my mum will baby it; so maybe no labradors as they like to eat constantly, I have heard!
  • short hair/not smelly
  • to be a pleasant, constant companion

Thanks very much for your help. I was thinking a Spaniel or Terrier of some sort? Or a cross thereof?

cheers

Andy
 

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As the 68 year old owner of a very new staffy x rescue two year old dog, I'm probably not the best person to advise Andy!! Having had spaniels, they can be a bit high maintenance with their ears and anal glands!! Also can, when young be equally bouncy and loveable as a stafford. Maybe go for a middleaged dog of any variety who has lived with cats and young children. Take the advice of the rescue you visit and I do hope you find the right dog for your family.
 

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Great minds Phoolf - I nearly said greyhound but didn't know in my ignorance that some were cat friendly. What a good idea
 
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I think cavalier king Charles spaniels make lovely pets, my mum has had them for years ( all rescues) great temperament etc. however some can have health issues though.
 

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I think cavalier king Charles spaniels make lovely pets, my mum has had them for years ( all rescues) great temperament etc. however some can have health issues though.
I think cavs are great for older people who are perhaps less mobile etc. Like you say though, health problems galore at times so could be very expensive. :(
 

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A greyhound should fit great :)

Spaniels require their ears cleaning, brushed, eyes kept clean and often need attachements removed so can be a bit much in maintenance. Plus the fact Springers and Cockers would be a no go-too much energy the only spaniels that would suit is Cavalier or Papillion.
 

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A greyhound or a whippet.

Most spaniels and terriers are as high, or higher, energy as your average staffy I would say. So if a staffy is too much a spanner or terrierist will be too!

Cavs are lower energy but as people have said soooo many health issues it's a mine-field. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your suggestions so far; greyhound is an interesting one, but may be just a bit too.....large? I know they aren't heavy as such, but they are quite a big dog and I can't imaging my mum sitting down to watch Strictly with a greyhound on her lap. Well, I can, but it makes me laugh.

Funny; me and my girlfriend had both thought of Cavaliers; lovely little dogs. Don't let thoughts of 'excessive looking after' put you off; this will be my mum's 'child replacement' (at least until my own kid(s) arrive!) so she'll love caring for a dog.

Excessive inbreeding and the health issues that surround it do worry me; I once had a Russian Blue cat that died of cancer at 7, and it was very upsetting.

We are discounting Yorkies as they look like they need a lot of washing after a walk in a muddy park?

I'm looking at pictures of Beagles.....any thoughts?

thanks

Andy
 
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Beagles....fabulous dogs that need loads and loads of exercise, well ours did. Bloody marvellous dogs, good solid training is a must.
 

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I think as you are going down the rescue route, then they will be able to best advise you on which of their dogs suit. They usually have a good knowledge of their dogs and how they would fit in to your requirements and lifestyle. Don't get bogged down thinking definitely want/don't want one breed or another as they may have the perfect dog that's not necessarily the first breed you would have considered.

Good luck on your search and hope you find your perfect family member.
 

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From my (limited) experience of greyhounds you would be surprised how small they can snuggle up for a cuddle on the couch ;) To be honest the greyhound I knew was more likely to settle down for a cuddle than any of the small dogs we've had/have!

I wouldn't discount them without meeting a few, they are lovely and there are loads needing good homes :)
 

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A Mini Schnauzer immediately springs to mind. They might be small, but they're bursting with character and like a big dog in a little body. They're sweet lovely natured dogs and will be good with the little one as they're not heavy enough to knock them over.
 

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I think as you are going down the rescue route, then they will be able to best advise you on which of their dogs suit. They usually have a good knowledge of their dogs and how they would fit in to your requirements and lifestyle. Don't get bogged down thinking definitely want/don't want one breed or another as they may have the perfect dog that's not necessarily the first breed you would have considered.

Good luck on your search and hope you find your perfect family member.
exactly what I was going to say :)
the rescue will do you a good job of matching you up with your perfect dog hopefully L)
 

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I would say a whippet.
I have a foster whippet here just now and he is more than happy to cuddle up on the couch, all day long! He enjoys his walks and is good with my cats (would chase them on a walk tho). Lovely dogs. Not too big, or too small either.
 

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Go to a local shelter, walk a few dogs and get to know them and see which is suitable :) good luck!
 

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If your thoughts are more toward an older dog, one that is easy company and will like a walk or two, then I would suggest a Jack Russell. Really low-maintenance, probably several out there and as friendly as you could wish - plus they do a good lap-dog bit as well.
 

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If your thoughts are more toward an older dog, one that is easy company and will like a walk or two, then I would suggest a Jack Russell. Really low-maintenance, probably several out there and as friendly as you could wish - plus they do a good lap-dog bit as well.
Goodness :yikes: I've obviously met some very different Jack Russells than you :laugh:
 

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I have a yorkie and I don't have to wash her after a walk in a muddy park. she is 7 pounds so doesn't sink into the mud and she also likes to walk around puddles. I also keep her in a medium cut rather than the shaved/short one you tend to see and don't find that it causes a problem. She is a perfect lap dog as well and doesn't yap. I would say although she is small I'm careful not to baby her and she is treated the same as my other dog who is more than twice her size.
 
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