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We now have a 5month old boxer puppy in the household and she is completely crazy. She will be going to puppy training classes but I want results now lol
How do I stop her from climbing on the table and worrying us all the time, jumping up etc etc. Other dog owners don't help by allowing her to do this when you meet them in the park. It seems that most thinking is to work on the positive re-enforcement which I believe is right for children most of the time but surely a primitive thinking animal needs conditioning methods?
I would be grateful for anyone who has tried and trusted methods of controlling these animals.
 

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We now have a 5month old boxer puppy in the household and she is completely crazy. She will be going to puppy training classes but I want results now lol
How do I stop her from climbing on the table and worrying us all the time, jumping up etc etc. Other dog owners don't help by allowing her to do this when you meet them in the park. It seems that most thinking is to work on the positive re-enforcement which I believe is right for children most of the time but surely a primitive thinking animal needs conditioning methods?
I would be grateful for anyone who has tried and trusted methods of controlling these animals.
I would like to welcome you to the forum, although it is a little late in the day. Unfortunately you have chosen rather a high spirited breed, and although a dog's brain may be limited, I would in no way call it primitive. After all, this is a creature who cannot speak or understand the spoken word in its entirety, but can safely care for blind people and other disabled people.

As to conditioning methods, what on earth do you think positive reinforcement is? Dogs do not come ready trained, it takes an awful lot of work and I would suggest you reach up on some of the better known authors, such as Karen Pryor or Jean Donaldson.
 

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Have to agree with newfiesmum, it seems like you jumped in to this whole thing completely blind if you didn't know boxers were like this or how to train a dog? I would recommend Jean Donaldson, as above, one of the best books would be The Culture Clash which will give you training ideas as well as an understanding as to how dogs work (which is in very much the same ways as humans in many respects so not so primitive). Training a dog is not so much about controlling them but getting their co-operation through positive means so that they want to do what you command, not that they HAVE to do it through coercion.
 

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2 things I think you need to do are firstly reward reward reward for good behaviour - i.e. bum staying on floor etc.
the secondly not give your pup the cahnce to fail - so keep her on lead at the park and if someone trys to encourage her to jump up say 'No I'm trying to train her, please ignore her until her bottom is on the floor then feel free to come down to her level and fuss her as much as you'd like - I know she'll appreciate it'

As for the climbing on the table - I can't help you there my Bichon Frise is on the dinning table looking for food and interesting things to chew as soon as I leave the room :eek: And walks straight across the coffe tables as a short cut :rolleyes:
 

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Sometimes you can divert behaviour you don't want as well, I really don't want every item in the house retrieved to me, but I'd rather have them brought to me in one piece than hidden and destroyed. So whenever my pup brings me something, it's a great prize and what a good girl she is. If I told her off at that point for having something in her mouth, she's more likely to hide the behaviour and possibly start nibbling what ever it is. So think about how your pup might interpret your reactions, it might not be how you think. Good training classes are invaluable because they train you what to do.
 

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We now have a 5month old boxer puppy in the household and she is completely crazy. She will be going to puppy training classes but I want results now lol
How do I stop her from climbing on the table and worrying us all the time, jumping up etc etc. Other dog owners don't help by allowing her to do this when you meet them in the park. It seems that most thinking is to work on the positive re-enforcement which I believe is right for children most of the time but surely a primitive thinking animal needs conditioning methods?
I would be grateful for anyone who has tried and trusted methods of controlling these animals.
I take it by your lol you realise there is no quick fix. ;)

How old was your pup when you took her on ?
Puppy training classes are good and I recommend finding one as soon as, don't wait for one of the course ones lots of clubs run weekly classes where you can just go along at any point in time. Look for ones that hold good citizen classes.

If you when you are out walking and she jumps up just politely explain to the stranger that you are trying to get her to sit before being fussed and have a pocketful of treats to praise her when she does so, as for the 'counter surfing' a firm 'STOP' and push her down will suffice. It will take time and it will take patience but YOU will end up with a puppy to be proud of. Lots of praise when she does things right, she will soon get the message.

Wish you luck and we are here if you need to rant, rant to us and not the puppy ;)
 

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Its up to you to train your dog not to jump up not others who he jumps up at. Some people don't mind dogs jumping up at them. I'm one I'll only stop my dog jumping up at people who don't want him to. As long as a dog jumps up at me is being friendly I fuss them for it. I can hardly say anything when my dog is same.

Try rewarding your dog for greeting someone by not jumping up.
 

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the quickest and easiest way to teach your dog not to jump up at people is to teach her to sit for attention and a reward. It's much easier to teach a behaviour you do want than to teach the absence of a behaviour you don't want.
The basics are, bum on floor = praise and treats, juping up = people turn away and ignore. Dogs are quick to work out what to do to earn the reward and at 2 1/2 my dog's default behaviour when he's not sure what he's supposed to do is sit and look cute.
 
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