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dog breeding

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by pet216, Dec 9, 2007.


  1. pet216

    pet216 PetForums Newbie

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    hi, i,m just wondering if anyone can help me,i'm looking to put my dog out to stud but don't know how to go about it.
    he is a 5yr old old english sheep dog,he has been hip scored (14) and is a lovely dog with a great nature,especially good with kids as i have 1yr old baby which he dots on.

    thanks pete
     
  2. colliemerles

    colliemerles PetForums VIP

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    hi, have you got any pictures of him, would love to see him,:):):)
     
  3. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

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    hi and welcome you can ask the breeder of your dog and let it be know you want to breed him with others in your breed
    has he not been proven?
     
  4. pkb1

    pkb1 PetForums Junior

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    Hi Carol
    im afraid you will find it very difficult for a few reasons!
    if he has never been usee before, 5 is very late to be starting!
    if he has not been shown with a modicum of sucess then the sort of people you would attract would probably be the "wrong" sort..............most importantly is that you realise that your obligation doesnt end with the mating itself, you are equaly as responsible for the ensuing puppies as the owner of the bitch is.....that is to say that you would have to be prepared to take on or re home any puppies that might find their way back to the "breeder" for any reason.....well done for having the hip scores done, is he KC registered? that could be another stumbling block if not, but consider this...........why should a bitch come to an unknown, unshown, un proven dog when there are hundreds out there that are all of those things?
    sorry it sounds such a negitive reply but breeding takes years of experience......and yes i know we all have to start somewhere but get the things and priorities in the right order before you consider going a head.
    believe me...........if something goes wrong with the pups its more likely your door they will come knocking on!
    Pauline :)
     
  5. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

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    hi pkb1
    i wont find it difficult as im not the one with the dog pet216 is the one
    and as ive been breeding for years i know
    just telling the person to get onto her breeder of her dog?
     
  6. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

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    I find it a little narrow minded that you feel that people who breed dogs who have not taken part in the breed ring are the "wrong" sort. There are thousands of breeders, who are breeding, healthy, beautiful temperamented dogs from parents who have never been in the breed ring.
    I do however agree with Pauline to consider this carefully, ensuring there is a demand for OES. There is no advantage to you in using him, did you want a pup yourself ?
     
  7. georges mummy

    georges mummy PetForums Member

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    i dont think its narrow minded of PKB1 at all.
    these "wrong" people are what ive heard refered to many a time as back yard breeders.
    yes there are 1000s of people who are breeding stunning dogs that have not been in a show ring. they have probably never had any health tests done either.
    there is also the fact that rescues are over run with unwanted dogs and pups.
    i spent months looking for my pup and trawled through 1000s of adverts to find him because i didnt want to buy one who came from unproved, untested parents with numerous problems. then have to go back to the breeder cause the pup has problems or worse.
    im not saying this is the case with every pup but it is with a lot of them.
    i have a kc reg british bull and a kc reg staffie. i also have staffie/bull terrier rescue whose dad was kc reg and whose mum was a bull terrier cross. i can say now my cross breed has had loads of problems health wise. but my 2 males have only been to the vets for flea treatment and boosters.
    sorry if im ranting on and i dont mean to offend but breeding is never to be taken lightly.
    good luck.
     
  8. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

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    I'm talking about the people who breed pedigree KC registered dogs who have had all the relevant health tests done prior to breeding, they are good breeders breeding from sound parents with good health and temperaments. Again I agree breeding should never be taken lightly, and there are people breeding poor specimens, in all walks of life. I am saying there are lots of people breeding excellent dogs, whose parents have never been in a breed ring. They do know what they are doing, they socialise and habituate the litter well and produce excellent family companions, which at the end of the day is what most people are looking for.
     
  9. Brainless

    Brainless Guest


    Breeding should be done to better a breed not simply to breed pups, so if the breeder is not involved with showing (which is the venue to assess the quality of their breeding stock against the standard and that of other breeders), or are involved with proving their dogs in the working arena where appropriate, why are they breeding?

    You cannot have reputable breeder that is not involved in their breed beyond producing puppies.

    In order to produce pups that meet the breed standard they need to evaluate their own and others breeding stock, that is what shows are primarily for. Otherwise they would have to drive up and down the country visiting breeders and stud owners to compare the dogs, and how would they find them in the first place if the owners were not members of breed societies.

    Unfortunately it isn't enough to be healthy, for breeding a dog must have a temperament beyond reproach and typical for the breed and should be a good to outstanding example of it's breed based on the breed standard. It is very easy for an owner to think all their geese are swans, showing and working their dogs gives them a perspective and comparison.

    There are more than enough pups left over from well bred litters for someone who wants a pedigree dog. For those who are not bothered about the looks and willing to take a chance on health and temperament there are plenty of dogs in rescue centres (where you won't be lining the pockets of poor breeders and puppy farmers), and at least their likely health issues are already apparent unlike a poorly bred pup.

    I know many people in rescue, and the dogs ending up there are those who have breeders who don't give a damn, else they would not be in rescue but being privately re-homed through their breeder (yes the odd breeder will have died or become too frail to take dogs back, especially years later, but this is rare).

    A well bred pup who could be taken into the ring or field and win makes just as god a companion as the poor specimen from a pet bred litter. the breeder has invested as much and more time in rearing it as well as choosing it's parentage.

    The buyer has the advantage of knowing the very best possible has been done to produce a typical specimen of it's breed with the least chance of health issues, the other kind of puppy producers produce good pets by sheer luck, even if the litter is reared well.

    If your paying for a pedigree pup shouldn't you expect teh whole package, and not a Skoda when you want a BMW.
     
  10. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

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    hi brainless
    you got beauitful dogs there
    just llike my friends loki who stays with me
     
  11. Brainless

    Brainless Guest

    Is Loki a Norwegian Elkhound then?
     
  12. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

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    yes she is
    i found a piccy of her

    its good when she come to stay as 1 of mine is called loki as well so when were out i call loki and get 2 dogs turn up.
     

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  13. Debbie

    Debbie PetForums VIP

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    Brainless - I would just like to say what a fantastic post - I totally agree with you on this subject but cannot always get it down through type as well as yours was put together....
     
  14. Brainless

    Brainless Guest

    That is very kind. I just get very hot under the collar when poor breeding practises are justified with the 'just a pet' argument, as all dogs are Pets and foremost, and there is no "Just£" about it, it is the most difficult thing to get right.

    Arguably you can have dogs like sled dogs, hunt hounds, flock guards etc who were/are not fitted to be pets due to their upbringing and breeding for those specific traits that make them great at their jobs but not easy to keep if not doing the job bred for.

    Most breeds have not only had to be selected for their breed traits and jobs but have that extra something that does make them fit to live with, this is not accident but selection.

    We find very many examples of poor and untypical character in the most exploited breeds (Labradors and Staffies come to mind), yet in the minority breed largely in the hands of only breed enthusiasts these divergences from typical are not accepted and weeded out.

    One of the only times my girls have been attacked by another dog was by a Male Labrador, what an indictment of poor breeding in a breed where sociability with other canines and people is basic to the breed.
     
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