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Dog bite that hasn't broke the skin

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Debbie46, Nov 21, 2020.


  1. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi
    My 17 month old dog has bitten my 6 year old daughter, it hasn't broke her skin just 2 red marks, I've bathed her and put sudocream on ths area. Dog was trying to get her toy which was under the blanket with my daughter. Do I need to do anything else?
     
  2. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    This podcast might be helpful for you







    All this podcast is well worth a listen but if you want to dive in i would start at 10min 30 secs.



    on a positive note, your dog has shown good bite inhibition and not broken the skin.
     
    #2 tabelmabel, Nov 21, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020
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  3. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Hi Debbie, are you asking about medical advice for your daughter?
    Or do you want to know what to do about the fact that your dog bit her and how to go about preventing that from happening again?

    If the skin isn't broken, you're probably fine. Though it may cause bruising if the skin was pinched. Where on her body did the dog bite her?

    Can you describe the circumstances of the bite with a little more detail? What was happening right before the dog tried to get the toy, how the dog reacted when he/she realized they had bitten your daughter not the toy?
     
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  4. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi my dog was genuinely just trying to get her toy from under blanket but grabbed my daughter on her side, instead, she ran and hid under table when she realised what she had done. Then sulked in her bed for a while once I'd told her no.
    Wasn't sure if i needed to see the doctor? The marks have already started to fade, plus would be be helpful to find a way of preventing it happening again.
    Thanks
     
  5. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you will have a look now
     
  6. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    If the marks are already starting to fade, no, I don't think your daughter needs to see a doctor. Obviously this is completely non-professional advice without having seen the mark at all, but from what you describe I would not be concerned in the least.

    It sounds like a true accident on your dog's part. Please don't punish her for a genuine mistake.
    Probably best to not have dog toys and blankets muddled up together, but I think all of us have had a nip or pinch from over enthusiastic toy play at some point or another.

    What breed/type of dog and how old is she?
    Do she and your daughter spend a lot of time together?
     
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  7. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    Shes a cocker spaniel and is 17 months old, she and my daughter are inseparable, always together. I haven't punished the dog just told her no as i panicked as i don't want her to be put down as a result and obviously don't want my daughter hurt.
     
  8. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like a genuine accidental bite to me - as you say, the dog was after the toy under a blanket, which I presume your daughter’s leg was under/near.

    It was a mistake to tell the dog off (which you realise) so I would just make sure that playtime is set up a bit better and supervised and toys are kept in a box when finished with, so it can’t happen again.

    It doesn’t sound like your daughter needs further treatment.

    I’d just be sure she understands it was an accident.
     
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  9. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Sorry, you did say her age in your first post.

    Why would she be put down? Have you had other incidents with her?

    The reality is, enough exposure to each other and yep, dogs accidentally hurt their humans and humans accidentally hurt their dogs. It's fairly normal. This morning my 9 pound dog accidentally scratched my lip waking up and stretching. It happens. You don't want to know the accidents the 90 pound dog has had :D

    Kids who live with dogs need to learn that accidents happen and we adjust as needed, forgive, and move on.

    That said, there are some important rules for kids and dogs living together. My two human kiddos grew up in a house with 4 large and XL dogs (great danes) and there are some things you can do to prevent a lot of issues.
    The most important one to me is making sure the dog has kid-free zones. Some dogs really do like kids and gravitate towards them. Many dogs like "their" kids, but are hit or miss with outside kids. Many dogs learn to tolerate kids but enjoy time away. All dogs need kid free zones and kid free time. Make sure there are places in your house where your dog knows she can go and will absolutely 100% not be bothered or even looked at by your daughter. Usually the crate is this place, but ideally there should be more than one place that the dog knows if their kid-free zone.

    Two, learn all about subtle body language dogs give to show that they're unsure or not enjoying an interaction. A game my kids used to love was to pet the dog, then back, off slightly and see what the dog does. If she moves towards the kid asking for more interaction, that's a great sign. But often the dog will yawn, look away, lip lick, or even move further away and shake off after you back off. That means that interaction maybe wasn't so pleasant. Respect that and give the dog space.

    As you learn about body language, watch for it, and when you see the dog is unsure, have your daughter back off, and encourage your dog to go to her kid-free zone. In a positive way, not a punishment, just showing her how she can choose to remove herself too.

    This is a great video on what relaxed body language looks like, and a great place to start:
     
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  10. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    I agree with lurcherlad that this was an accident from a dog with good bite inhibition. There is no need to be thinking your dog needs to be put down as a result of this - especially as it is clear and easy to see what led up to this happening.

    If you can stick with that podcast right through, you will be left feeling a lot more reassured im sure.

    I just suggested diving in as i know the voice on the podcast is hard to listen to for many and there is a pre-amble on there which could see you give up within a minute but if you can stick it out, there is lots of useful stuff in there which will prevent any repeat of this.

    As for the bite, it doesnt sound at all serious if it hasnt broken the skin. You might well find it bruises over the next day or two, and it might even be that a lump forms under the skin which will disappear over time. Obviously seek medical advice if you have concerns that it is infected, very painful or your daughter seems unwell with it.
     
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  11. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

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    Yes, stop your daughter playing with the dog toys
    And
    Only have said toys out when either your daughter isn't there
    Or
    Under close 1 to 1 supervision
    By which I mean 1 person exclusively for dog
    1 person exclusively for daughter

    Did you see the bite happen or did it happen under the blanket?
    If it was under the blanket, so you didn't actually see it, it could have been the dog repositioning its grip on the toy, and caught your daughter (I've had the results of that happening more than once) rather than a full on bite
    Either way, what I said previously stands, no unsupervised play time between them, no hands/heads under blankets, rugs, any type of anything where you cannot see 100%of either of them, and all toys up out of reach of both
     
  12. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    My daughter wasn't playing with the dog toy, she was on floor wrapped in blanket while watching tv, she wasn't aware that the toy was there, she knows not to take the dogs toys. They are never left alone together! Dog was just trying to get her toy thats all
     
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  13. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Honestly, I don’t think there’s anything to worry about ;)
     
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  14. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I agree @Debbie46 :)
    As @Lurcherlad says, there's really nothing to worry about, it does sound like a complete accident, and these things happen when you live with dogs.

    Maybe @mrs phas was thinking about resource guarding, and if that were the case, yes, taking away all resources is one of the ways to start dealing with it. But if your dog is 17 months old, and she and your daughter are inseparable, presumably they've been together for over a year with no incidents, I would call this a one-off and not overthink it too much.

    Other than this incident, has your dog ever given you reason not to trust her with your daughter? Have there been any incidents other than this one?

    This is just my opinion as a life-long dog owner, I grew up with dogs, my kids have grown up with dogs, I had twin toddlers and 4 large dogs in the house.
    I don't know who these people are who manage to never live child and dog unsupervised, not have dropped food or toys about, but I was not one of them. Yes, ideally dogs and kids aren't left unsupervised, but the reality is, it happens. And if I can't trust my dog not to maul my child while I run check on the other child, that's not a dog I'm going to have around children at all. Certainly not in my house.
    But the good news is, the vast, huge majority of dogs are no danger to children and draconian measures for supervision and house arrangements aren't necessary :)
     
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  15. Debbie46

    Debbie46 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for everyones advice. She has two very small bruises now but you really have to look for them if that makes sense.
    She bit my daughter when we first got her, but my daughter touched her while she was eating and dog was very protective of her bowl, we didn't know this when we got her. But that was over a year ago, dog now eats in kitchen and my daughter, or any child that visits leaves her to eat, even though she is no longer protective of her bowl/food, we can put our hands in bowl while shes eating. We had to take her to hospital that time, although it was a tiny break in the skin.
    We don't leave them alone together but even if we was to my dog follows me when i leave the room anyway.
     
  16. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Ah, yes, this would fall under the "have you had any other incidents with her" ;)

    It's good that you let her eat in peace, all dogs should be undisturbed while eating. Though the putting hands in bowl is very outdated advice and really not recommended.

    There is a thread on here about resource guarding that may be worthwhile for you to read through.
    https://www.petforums.co.uk/threads/resource-guarding.279444/

    Do you feel like your dog resource guards at all? Does her body language suggest uncertainty or discomfort around favorite toys, food, or locations she likes to be, like a favorite spot on the sofa?
     
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