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Dog Allergy?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by woofo, Jun 9, 2010.


  1. woofo

    woofo PetForums Newbie

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    We have just re-homed a dog, unfortunatly the day before my daughter had an asthma flair up which is taking a long time to calm down. She has had no prior problem with dogs but I am concerned this may be a trigger. :(

    We have thought long and hard before adopting a dog and now really concerned things are not going to work out as obviously her health comes first. Are there an people out there who can offer me advise. I have looked at allergy management info and following this best I can.
     
  2. JessiesGirl

    JessiesGirl PetForums Senior

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    Your poor daughter will probably need to be allergy tested for dogs.

    I am allergic to dogs and grew up with a breeder/exhibitor! The dogs stayed and we worked it out.

    Here's what worked for me (which may or may not work for your daughter if she is allergic to dogs):

    -All our dogs were groomed daily and bathed weekly to keep dander down.

    -We vacuumed every single day.

    -None of our dogs were allowed upstairs or into the family bedrooms. They were also not allowed on the furniture in any room.

    -After my allergy testing, I started allergy desensitization shots. These helped tremendously, but I still needed to take allergy medication. I did not and do not now have asthma, however.

    -I found that I was fine petting the dogs, playing with them, etc. But to this day, if a dog licks me, I break out in hives immediately. The saliva is the hardest thing for me to deal with. I've trained every dog I've ever lived with not to lick me. It's easy to do.

    You're going to need to speak with your daughter's doctor about whether the dog is a trigger and whether it's safe for her to attempt management techniques for living with a dog. Asthma can be quite serious, so I'd take your doctor's advice on this one.
     
  3. Montys_Mum

    Montys_Mum PetForums Member

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    With this I have experience :)

    I also have asthma and had an allergy test at hospital many years ago. Oddly enough I was clear and fine with cats but really bad with dogs. (I am also highly allergic to pollen, house dust mite, hay etc - which caused me loads of problems when I used to ride horses! I couldn't breathe in their stables....had to give it up).

    I was brought up in a house with cats all my life, which maybe why I am not allergic to them.

    Yes we have a dog...so how do I cope?

    Well we don't have any carpet downstairs which means no fur/dander etc can get trodden in and case me issues (Monty doesn't go upstairs where there is carpet).

    We wash his bedding regularly.

    My hubby brushes him regularly in a different room and disposes of the fur.

    We use doggy wipes to 'wash him', as you shouldn't bathe a dog too often, and he loves being wiped down :) It helps clear out loose fur and dander, as well as mud/dirt.

    Also I am on a prescription allergy tablet which works really well, so I'd suggest seeing what your doctor can prescribe as I find the off the shelf remedies don't help.

    We don't have grass in the back garden, it is stones, as I do have issues with grass pollen too.

    It isn't 100% and sometimes I feel it in my chest, as soon as that happens his bedding is washed, he is brushed etc and then I feel okay again. It's a good timer on when his bedding needs cleaning lol

    It may not work for your daughter, but perhaps putting in place the above may work.

    So all is not lost, and worth trying the above.

    I did look into so called low-allergy dogs that don't shed. It is *thought* that may help with allergies and that allergies are caused by the dander. So you could look up different dog breeds. But that is only an idea some experts have and isn't 100% proven (well that's what my research seemed to suggest). So we chose the right breed for our lifestyle instead. Bassets do shed and I find I cope fine with the above points.

    I hope some of this helps, I sympathise and hope it works out well.
     
  4. woofo

    woofo PetForums Newbie

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    Jessiesgirl & Monty's Mum thanks so much for your replies. There is some really useful information in there, thankfully it looks like we are halfway there regarding no carpets and the dog is not allowed upstairs. I am also hoping that the symptoms are starting to calm down and that most of the effects were an aftermath from the previous attack.

    I am crossing my fingers, however as good practise will use the advise you have given as a matter of course. Many thanks again and heres hoping for many years of happy dog ownership!
     
  5. JessiesGirl

    JessiesGirl PetForums Senior

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    I hope it works out for you! And it's wonderful to hear that your daughter seems to be breathing easier!

    Even though I had some problems with 8 or more dogs, I now live quite happily with one dog. My dog allergy was not severe. I was just living with too many as a child!

    But here's a strange thing about allergies:

    -There's a bit of a building effect to them. So if you are allergic to more than one thing, it gets complicated. I'll try to explain.

    -Let's say that you are allergic to dogs and to strawberries, mild allergy to both. On a day you weren't around any dogs, you might be able to eat 10 strawberries before you had a reaction. But if you also spent time with a dog that day, two strawberries might provoke a reaction! The reverse is also true. The dog may not bother you at all until you eat those darned strawberries! Once you encounter the first allergen, the others become worse to you as your body is already beginning to react from the first one. Other allergens you encounter in the same period seem far worse because they are adding to the initial slight reaction and creating a large one.(Does that make sense or have I explained it poorly?)

    This is why the shots helped me so very much. I'm allergic to pollens, molds, dust mites and pretty much anything that has fur or feathers. The pollens, molds and dust mites are totally unavoidable. So I HAD to get shots for them. Adding the dog to the shots was almost an afterthought. ;)

    BUT

    Reducing my reaction to all those environmental allergies through the shots made it possible for me to live with dogs!

    If your daughter turns out to have some allergies as well as asthma, shoot me an email. Hopefully, I can help you out. Sounds as though Monty'sMum could as well! :)
     
    #5 JessiesGirl, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2010
  6. billyboysmammy

    billyboysmammy PetForums VIP

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    I cant add much more other than some of the most glaringly obvious.

    Your daughters asthma flared up before you got the dog.

    Its currently high pollen season, which often leads to more asthma symptoms

    The weather is currently very changable, which leads to more asthma attacks


    I would do everything with regards to minimising the risk, but give it a while for the weather and the pollen to settle down.

    I have asthma and it tends to flare up twice a year. The first is around late spring/early summer due to certain grass and tree pollens. The second is usually autumn when the weather starts to become very changable again.

    Hope that helps x
     
  7. Montys_Mum

    Montys_Mum PetForums Member

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    I find some of my issues stem from the pets going through grass/bushes/plants etc and then coming inside.

    Ref the allergy shots, something I might consider for myself! I have very bad allergies to a lot of things and although I cope well a lot of the time, it isn't always perfect.

    Anyway enough about me! LOL I hope things go well for your daughter, and at least you have some options to try :)
     
  8. Aurelia

    Aurelia PetForums VIP

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    IMO it's not the dog she is allergic to if anything at all.

    What ever you do, do not tell your daughter she might be allergic to the dog, until you have proof either way.

    My husband was brought up to believe he was allergic to this that and the other. Even though when he came into contact with these things he almost stopped breathing (the worst times) ... he actually was not allergic at all.

    When I met him he was on 4 different inhalers for asthma, and took antihistamines every day all year round. Now he has two inhalers for his asthma, but only needs them because he needs to lose some weight. When he is down to recommended weight he doesn't need them at all!

    It was a long process to get to this point. But I knew almost straight away that his allergies were mostly psychological, as I saw him come into contact, or very close to the things he was supposed to be allergic to (he didn't realise, or hadn't noticed) ... yet he didn't react. But if he saw them he would go into melt down. To anyone, even a doctor he would have appeared to exhibit all the symptoms of allergies, but it was actually just in his head!

    He was brought up to believe he should avoid things like the plague because if he came into contact with them he would probably stop breathing :rolleyes:.
     
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