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Does anyone have Cornish Rex who is happy to be left alone?

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by RexisHuman, May 1, 2020.


  1. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    I got my Cornish Rex kitten about a month ago. I have wanted a cat for years, and this quarantine time gave me the opportunity to bond for a couple of weeks, and then I'd be back in the office. I explained my life situation to the breeder - I live on my own and I am away from home for about 10 hours a day for work. She assured me he would be happy in my home. I know I screwed up... I didn't do enough research on the breed before getting him, and I now know that the Cornish Rex does not like to be alone, and is a very needy breed. I was hasty because I was trying to get him before lockdown, and I take full responsibility for that. Fast forward a month, and he is a perfect kitty - he has never had a toilet accident, he can stay, come, catch, and fetch. He can navigate around a wine glass on the arm of the sofa like a champ. Basically, I love him. BUT he is starting to show signs of boredom despite 3 climbing places (one 10 feet high!), lots of toys, I play with him actively for at least an hour a day, he sleeps on me for at least another 2 hours... he is a spoiled boy, but he is bored, and I am beyond worried about going back to work. I do not want another cat as my flat is small, and there isn't room for a 2nd litter box as the internet says is necessary (I have done extensive research on options!). I want to know... does anyone out there have a happy well-adjusted only male Cornish Rex? Can mine be happy too?!
     

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  2. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    How can you tell he’s bored? Not a cat person myself, just wondered .
     
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  3. Treaclesmum

    Treaclesmum PetForums VIP

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    He's a cutie! If I were you, I probably would get another, ideally the same breed but a more laid back breed may be even better. Two cats don't need twice as much space, and two kittens will usually bond quickly and spend hours playing together and sleeping together.
     
  4. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Cornish, like other active breeds do tend to prefer company.
    Pair him with another breed of similar energy, mis-matched energy levels can be an issue as he may harass a laid back breed to play when they aren't suited.

    The vast majority of people I know don't follow the litter box "rule" with no issues, the cats quite happy to share.
     
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  5. Marg.

    Marg. PetForums Senior

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    Hi, I can't help on your problem but just wanted to say, your boy is gorgeous, what's his name?
     
  6. SbanR

    SbanR PetForums VIP

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    Op says she hasn't room for a second litter box. If she gets a second cat, I would think 2 cats left for 10 hours with only one tray between them could be asking for trouble.
     
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  7. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    Another Cornish would do him well, as @spotty cats has already said, matching energy levels is important. Can you discuss another kitten with your breeder, or can they refer you to one of their breeder colleagues?
     
  8. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @RexisHuman - an hour's interactive play with you a day is really not enough for a kitten on its own. As he has no kitten play-mate you do need to fill the role of playmate, and 3 hours a day of you playing with him would be more reasonable for him.

    A ex-neighbour of mine had Cornish Rex cats and I remember her saying that Cornish Rex cats are a very intelligent breed who usually form strong bonds with their humans and thrive on human contact. They learn new things quickly and enjoy mental challenges. They may enjoy interactive games with their humans e.g. "Fetch" . If a Cornish Rex is left on their own too much they may get bored and develop destructive behaviour in the home to relieve the stress.

    Leaving your cat alone in a small flat for 10 hours a day sounds a lot. But if you spend several hours every evening (and more at weekends) focused on playing with him, he might be OK. He will need safe physical challenges for his energy, such as climbing and jumping opportunities, and mental challenges to satisfy his intelligence.

    Once your kitten is a bit older he will need a minimum of two litter boxes, because most adult cats like to pee and poo in different litter boxes. While the company of another kitten would be nice for him, as adult cats they would need 3 litter boxes between the two cats. Litter boxes are a valued resource for cats, particularly cats who are indoors all the time; and it is not advisable to skimp on them.
     
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  9. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    Its very easy to Google, just make sure you're looking at the right pages when you do. The best place to go for advice on the breed are the Breed Clubs, as they are run by breeders and owners who have regular hands on experience.

    The Rex Cat Association advises the following:
    https://www.rexcatassociation.co.uk/so-you-want-a-rex

    This is not a breed that can live on its own, regardless of how much play you give it. It thrives on company and your kitten needs a friend.

    Most well socialised, well adjusted cats do very well sharing a tray. Often its the ones who left mum too early that struggle to cope.

    I think you should just accept the inevitable and get another kitten :D
     
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  10. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    Surely their neighbours would be a wonderful resource as well.


    I was talking to a breeder friend today, she prefers kittens have company, an energetic moggy works fine if 2 peds are a bit out of budget.
     
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  11. Treaclesmum

    Treaclesmum PetForums VIP

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    I wouldn't like to have an energetic moggy in a small flat though. Peds are designed to adapt to indoor life. But if you can somehow find a spot for that extra litter tray, another ped would be great - try ped rescue centres, they will be more affordable :)
     
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  12. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @RexisHuman

    Hi,
    I have a different opinion on litter trays. I don't think the issue is, as someone said, the age the cat left their littermates defining how well they share a tray.
    My cats share two trays. They have no issues sharing, as the trays are in separate areas of the flat and cleaned out several times a day.
    I think tray sharing issues come about more from the size and number of trays for the number of cats & how often the trays are cleaned.

    I think two trays can work well with two cats, as they have done so in our case. But they are scooped out at least twice but sometimes three/four times a day.
    If you can get a tray with a hood, or the type that is covered minus a hole for popping in and out on top, maybe you can have two trays in the flat.
    There are various sizes and shapes. I have seen triangular to fit into corners.

    As @chillminx said, cats sometimes prefer to urinate and defecate in separate trays. I have seen this with one of my cats.

    Worth considering another kitten I think, as it may be lonely and dull for your current kitten once you are not home as much.
    My two, ages about 4 and 1.6 years do play and interact together a lot.
     
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  13. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    Hi chillminx, thanks for your feedback. I think you are right in that he will need more attention than I can give him, and 3 litter boxes in my flat is out of the question, so another cat is sounding like a non-starter. I love him to bits, but I may look for a home for him preferably where there is another Cornish Rex looking for a friend, and a definitely a human who is home a lot of the time.
     
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  14. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Summercat, thank you for your feedback. I have considered another kitten, and I would love nothing more than to watch them play together, but even if I found another spot for a litterbox (my bedroom or the kitchen, neither of which is ideal), there is no way I could scoop them that often as I am away from home for around ten hours a day during the week. I fear that introducing another cat would create toilet problems between them. I was hoping for someone to tell me that they have a happy well-adjusted single Cornish Rex but sadly the theme of the comments is to get another cat, which is an option I have ruled out :(
     
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  15. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    I have thought that myself, believe me. It would be so easy to just go get another kitten, but if the toilet thing doesn't work out, or if I will then have two kittens to re-home.I was hoping someone out there had a happy Cornish Rex living alone, but so far, it does not seem that way. I will check out the breed clubs, thank you.
     
  16. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    They let you know when they're bored :) I work from home and on busy days where I don't get a break, he cries at me, eats more, sleeps a lot. Toward the end of the work week, he starts to get frustrated and will nip at me to get attention. He is fine by the end of the weekend, and then we start again. He is a super-energetic kitty which I actually love, as he is so funny to watch, and he is a lot of fun to play with... I just regret that I don't have the time to let him be that way all the time, and he deserves to play as much as he wants to!
     
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  17. RexisHuman

    RexisHuman PetForums Newbie

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    He's Rexi (not creative for a Cornish Rex, I know, haha,.. but he is definitely a Rexi :))
     
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  18. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    The toileting thing is made out to be a much bigger issue than it actually is, particularly on this forum.

    I know of absolutely no breeder, or indeed owner, friend or acquaintance of mine who follows the "rule" of trays, their homes would be overrun with litter trays if that were the case. To think that you would need to rehome over litter trays is peculiar, that would not generally be a rehoming issue.

    We empty our trays twice a day - morning and night. I have 9 cats and 4 trays in use - 1 in with my stud, and 3 with the remaining 8.

    Cats shouldn't toilet so much that the litter trays would need significant cleaning out twice a day, and if they do then the issue is not the trays but what they're eating.

    As an aside, if you feel that you need to rehome Rexi then you need to approach his breeder first and foremost.
     
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  19. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    @RexisHuman
    I think you know your home and space best and are making a decision with the needs of your kitten first, which is good.

    I don't think I would try to return Rexi to his breeder, as was suggested, as she seemed to not put the kittens needs first, since she knew of your home situation but was happy to sell him.
     
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  20. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Rufus15 - until you have been there yourself it is best not to make value judgments and sweeping statements. If one of your cats started frequently soiling in the house (with urine or faeces) I expect you would not be quite as glib and dismissive about the litter tray advisory rule as you are being. The rule is based on experts' long experience, and their in-depth understanding of cat behaviour.

    Many times (both on the forum and in RL) when I've been asked for advice from owners whose cats are house soiling, the owners are on the verge of rehoming the cat or handing them over to a Rescue. I try and help the owners avoid having to give up their cat. To suggest that if someone re-homed a cat over a house-soiling issue is "peculiar" is a very unsympathetic attitude, and unlikely to reassure the OP @RexisHuman

    The reasons why cats soil in the home are often complex and may be hard to identify. But often, I'm glad to say, that adding an extra litter tray (or two) especially in a multicat household, is something that helps towards resolving the house soiling issues.
     
    #20 chillminx, May 2, 2020
    Last edited: May 2, 2020
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