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Do you put people off your breed or encourage them?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Katalyst, May 25, 2017.


  1. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    Further to the Malinois thread, I realised whilst having the same old discussion for the 46th time this month with a fellow dog walker that I really undersell dobermanns as a breed and do my level best to put people off of them.

    I tend to get a lot of people ask about them when I'm out with just Maude doing training ask round distractions (oddly no one asks when she is throwing a shit-fit because they've let their dog run up to her :oops: )
    My experience with Maude (duel working and show strain bred) and a variety of others (mostly WL, some imports, some show animals) is that by and large, they're not easy dogs at all. They're head strong, stubborn, powerful and tend towards reactivity which needs constant management.
    They live very much with a "well, what's in it for me?" attitude and aren't fond of lots of repetitions in training. They can get easily frustrated if you up criteria too fast and then they simply stop trying.
    Maude has a good settle but many of the others I've spent time around seem to find it very hard to chill out and need to constantly pace from one room to another.
    Maude will get "grabby" if she gets frustrated, usually if I'm not quick enough throwing her ball reward when she decides she's done something right/has finished what was asked of her. I'm working hard on that right now because she WILL and has grabbed my hands, arms and on one awful occasion, my right tit because she's frustrated and I'm not being quick enough.
    Conversely, a friend has a BYB bred dobe that is very un-dobermann like to me and I know a couple of people with show dobes who are quite honestly almost like black and tan labradors and nothing like WL dobes at all.

    Logan is a different kettle of fish entirely and I regularly suggest lurchers (specific cross depending... I can't imagine suggesting a saluki x Bedlington as a first time dog for example!) as a good fit for families.
    He is from a long line of working dogs, his dad being a WL border collie x greyhound and his mum a working saluki with some greyhound in the background x WL border collie.
    Logan is technically much more collie than most lurchers are and it shows. He is super fast of brain and if I were a more capable trainer, I'd probably be able to teach him to mow the lawn and take the rubbish out...
    He loves to learn and seemingly enjoys performing. He'll sometimes offer random behaviours to see if it's something that will get him a treat and we can shape into something specific.
    He's very in tune with me and people in general and will behave accordingly.
    Despite being rather intense, he has very few vices and those he has got are easily managed with minimal effort.
    He was a pretty difficult puppy looking back at it but that's no great surprise given his breed mix. Frankly, puppies and teenagers ARE difficult and no one should expect anything different.
    The saluki and collie elements were most obvious through adolescence and he is a lot more 'sharp' than most people realise because he's expected to be calm and well behaved. I can handle him anywhere and everywhere but I tend to muzzle him if he is injured and needs a vet because he WILL get his teeth out if he thinks someone is overstepping their bounds (he's never bitten, but will air snap worryingly close to skin).

    I consider lurchers in general to be fairly easy dogs, especially once past the juvenile delinquent phase but obviously they're highly variable cross depending so it's hard to generalise.


    So do you sell your breed to people or steer them away? Do you consider your breed difficult or easy? Why?
     
  2. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

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    The Staffie - Tell them they make fabulous family dogs because they adore people, are pretty biddable cuddle monsters, who like to snog, and have little respect for personal space :), with 3potential problems.
    1. Can be prone to dog aggression, normal won't start it, but can finish it. Can be easily trained to focus on person tho because of above
    2. May need thick skin, some people freak out on sight of anything remotely bullbreed. This can obviously be upsetting to some people
    3. An adolescent bullbreed x in my experience was an enormous PITA. Get an older one!!!

    ETS - try to get a breed standard one too - because of BullShitLaws
     
    #2 Lexiedhb, May 25, 2017
    Last edited: May 25, 2017
  3. evel-lin

    evel-lin PetForums VIP

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    I wouldn't steer people towards English Shepherds and would give them the warts and all stories. However I think for someone who is prepared to put in the training and understands the potential issues that can crop up they can be a fab dog who can turn their hand (?paw) to most things you'd ask of them
     
    Katalyst likes this.
  4. ForestWomble

    ForestWomble PetForums VIP

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    When someone says they want a dog like Bungo I do generally say 'No you don't'.

    In some ways he has been easy, an absolute delight, in other ways he has been more difficult then I imagined.
     
    Sarah H, Katalyst and LinznMilly like this.
  5. Kimmikins

    Kimmikins PetForums VIP

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    I tell people that westies are fantastic, stubborn, big dogs in little bodies, but I always say that I don't consider them good first dogs. I wish I knew then what I know now, as there is so much more that I could've done with him. He is a great dog more by luck than my input, and he still has a lot of flaws even at 12; he is gobby, impatient, selective of hearing and probably falls into the MDIF category.

    I always sell the lurcher, greyhoundy-ness of Sara. She is so eager to please, so gentle and placid and a real cuddle monster; give her a sofa and a cuddle slave and she is set for the day. Her only flaw comes from her being a year old when we got her; she is so fast, and knows it, that I will never trust her off-lead. She is very sight/smell orientated that if she clocks something or gets a scent there is literally no talking to her.
     
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  6. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    Depends on the person :)
    I told @Pappychi she needs a dane because I really don't like her and want to see her suffer with a dane pup :Hilarious:Hilarious

    No, seriously, it just depends. I mean, there are instances where I try to talk someone out of a totally unsuitable breed, but at the end of the day it's their choice, and unless they're specifically asking me for my opinion (like on here) then it's not really for me to try to convince people either way.
     
  7. shadowmare

    shadowmare The dog doesn't bite, me on the other hand...

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    I stay realistic. I explain what sort of person aussies suit and why I consider myself lucky with Axel. I hate it when I see people selling the breed as an "ideal family dog".
     
    MiffyMoo, Katalyst and Lurcherlad like this.
  8. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    I often get asked about mine especially since they have become very popular, A lot of the questions were things like do I breed, have I got any pups for sale,, where can I get a pup, and I have even had people stop and ask do I want another or do I know anyone who wants one, because they or someone they know wants to rehome theirs Ive even been asked do I want to breed by male/female as they have got one on quite a few occasions. I even had one guy stop and say did I want anymore because a mate has bred and cant sell the pups. So by then its too late to tell them what they are like and pros and cons. If I can I do tell people what they are like, and if people genuinely ask if they are having problems or want to know something I will give help and I am honest and will tell them the good and bad points. Sometimes you see its taken in and I have had people say Ive always wanted one but I see they might not be the dog for me, or people take it onboard and say they would still get one even if they are different and harder work then they thought. Some though totally glaze over and you can see nothing whatsoever is going in, and they have decided they want one whatever and will get one regardless. Or you are trying to help with problems and again they glaze over and have no intention whatsoever of following suggestions and things that may help with behaviour or problems at all.
     
    Katalyst likes this.
  9. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    I do tell the positives in that Jack has a lovely calm nature and is a dream to live with, but make sure people also understand that I think I have been quite lucky because many lurchers from rescue often have a few issues that need ironing out! ;)

    For some people not being able to go off leash in the open would be a deal breaker and he is quite aloof, which some people would also find offputting.

    I also labour the point that he is very sensitive ;)
     
    planete and Katalyst like this.
  10. ouesi

    ouesi Guest

    What is an "ideal family dog" anyway?
    For us our two are indeed ideal dogs. They fit right in with everything we're doing, can come with us on long hikes, are great with the kids and visitors. But they're both totally untrustworthy with cats and small furries, not exactly dog friendly, can't take them to the park and have them get along with every and all dogs...
    Yet for us, they're perfect.
    A more traditional "family dog" breed like say a cavvie or bichon would not work for us at all!
     
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  11. Nagini

    Nagini PetForums Senior

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    i try not to put people off the breeds i owned in the past, nor would i do it with my current one, even though most of mine have been known for maybe being a little intense. i think it all depends on the kind of person interested in the breed, and how capable they come across.
     
  12. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    No ones ever shown any interest in owning a Ned :(

    Tbh, i dont feel knowledgeable enough to advise people one way or the other anyway.

    All three of the dogs ive owned as an individual have all been of the same breed/type and every one has been so different in temperament, personality and behaviour that appearance is about the only thing they had in common.
     
  13. Dogloverlou

    Dogloverlou PetForums VIP

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    Well no one ever mentions my breed in these breed suggestion threads or in general, so I don't find myself in a position I have to think about it really.

    However, I have recently discussed the breed with you & briefly with @Pappychi too, so I obviously think you're both worthy enough :D
     
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  14. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    Depends on the person
     
  15. Lexiedhb

    Lexiedhb Team Ginger!

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    Except just about every other person on here!!!!!!! :p:p
     
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  16. Kimmikins

    Kimmikins PetForums VIP

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    I want Ned!
     
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  17. SpicyBulldog

    SpicyBulldog PetForums VIP

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    Really depends on the person and what they want. I usually recommend research before getting any breed.

    I do provide people with realistic down side of Pit ownership possible dog aggression, BSL, trouble renting, trouble obtaining HOI, prey drive, can have a high energy level, determined and athletic can get them in trouble, breed bias or people hating your dog simply because of the breed.
     
  18. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    I mean those who have met him in real life.

    He's an even bigger dick in the flesh.
     
  19. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    Absolutely yes, this goes without saying.
    Obviously it's not a simple one-size-fits-all thing and no, 'family pet' doesn't really mean anything.
    I'm just talking generally really. Average Joe who randomly asks about your dog breed when you're out and about who may or may not have ever kept asks dog before.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  20. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    GR's are generally known to be a first timers dog and I more or less support that, but like all breeds they have their drawbacks and it does really depend on the person/family.

    They are hairy and the fluff gets everywhere. It's generally found in mouthfuls of food, on your toothbrush, in rooms the dogs never been in and mounds of it appear at regular intervals on the carpet. If you can't be doing with that then don't bother as it doesn't go away, if anything it gets worse as the dog ages particularly if neutered.
    They like mud and water, preferably both at the same time.
    They need to be exercised daily or will make their own entertainment, especially if working bred.
    I wouldn't advise a newbie dog owner to get a working bred retriever. Some are more relaxed, but many are live wires.
    Show bred retrievers tend to be heavier and have a denser coat and, in my experience, a bit less bright then a working bred dog.
    On the plus side they are generally good natured, desparate to please you and be with you and easy to train.
    If nothing else they go out of their way to make you laugh on a daily basis.
     
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