Disabled and thinking of getting a chiwawa, GOOD idea?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by cljones81, Apr 16, 2018 at 2:25 PM.


  1. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi:

    I've been thinking for awhile about getting a chiwawa puppy but Im wondering if it would be a good idea, as Im disabled and an electric wheelchair user although I dont use the chair in the flat, I crawl as the flat is too small for manuverablity.

    I live on my own have a gardens front(with ramped access) and back, spend most of my time at home, other than the occasional visits to ASDA, to the local town or friends twice a week.

    I would be planning to purchase a dog home (crate) etc for the living room and would gladly sleep on the sofa in the living room until the puppy is comfortable on their own.

    My question is this would a chiwawa be suitable for a person such as myself and would they be comfortable to be carried on my lap either held or in a carrier, while a took them out for exercise or toiletery needs in my wheelchair?

    As I previously owned a jack russell terrier that would not sit in my lap or walk on the lead and was down right dangerous around my wheelchair. It was also very tempermental and has attacked me on several occasions leaving bite scars on my hands and arms. So much so that refuse to have the dog living with me due to his jekyll and hyde nature and his tendency to escape, i have given up ownership to my parents.

    Since this experience, I have been put off dog ownership but I simply was wondering if the chiwawa was the dog to restore my faith?

    Any Advice would be appreciated.

    Christian.
     
  2. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

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    I think it would really depend on the character of the individual dog. Some are ok with a sedate lifestyle, others will be a lot more fiesty. With a puppy it’s hard to tell how they will end up. All puppies, even Chihuahuas, are hard work for those that are able bodied so I imagine it is even more of a struggle if you have a disability. Toy breeds can be notoriously difficult to housebreak. Have you considered an older adult rescue that is toilet trained and is looking for a sedate ‘retirement’ home?
     
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  3. ShibaPup

    ShibaPup PetForums Senior

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    There is member on here who uses a wheelchair and has a little dog. I remember from the tricks thread - can't remember the username though!

    Hope they come along to offer some advice :)
     
  4. Animallover26

    Animallover26 I am me.

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    Hi,
    I don't know anything about Chi's but being a wheelchair user myself and having a small breed dog from 8 weeks old, I will say it is possible.

    Personally I wouldn't go for a chi due to their size plus they come across as quite 'delicate' to me, so to me a dog that small crossed with a wheelchair is probably not the best idea, but hopefully someone with Chi's can tell you more about them as a dog.

    I have a miniature poodle cross terrier and he has been fine with the wheelchair from the beginning, I can pick him up if needed, but he learnt to walk along with me, keeping himself slightly in front and to the side of the chair so no danger of being run over.
     
  5. Animallover26

    Animallover26 I am me.

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    Haha, was replying while you wrote that, 'tis little me :D
     
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  6. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for the replies, I dont think an adult rescue would be for me, as to my mind at least you are dealing with an unknown quantity in terms of personality, temperament and a whole myraid of other issues. There must of been a reason for the dog to be surrendered in the first place, perhaps through no fault of their own perhaps not, for example, a friend of mine took in a rescue (staffie) that had such bad seperation anxiety, it would howl/bark and even escaped through a small living room window to try and find him (once) whenever he would go out so much so had to return it to the shelter.

    Its nice to know it is possible to have a dog, train it and be in a wheelchair, but I would not necessary walk the chi but rather carry the dog to an area, an allow it to explore on a lead while Im stationary in the chair, as I am not wheelchair bound and am able to get in and out of the chair when required and combine this with exercise in my gardens which are of a fair size.

    But as I say it is just an idea for some company Im kicking round at the moment
     
  7. Gemmaa

    Gemmaa PetForums VIP

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    Having a dog from a puppy isn't a guarantee that you'll get a problem free dog. I know a dog with separation anxiety, and it was present from the first time they left it alone at 8 weeks, and two years later, it's still a big issue.
    Just something to think about before ruling out a rescue :)
     
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  8. Animallover26

    Animallover26 I am me.

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    Would you be happy to have a dog walker if you do not intend to walk the dog?

    I may be wrong but if you are absolutely intent on the dog would be a chi, I think they need more exercise then you'd think.
     
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  9. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    At this point, everythings possible, I would definitely make sure I exercised\walked the dog on a daily basis. But as a friend once advised me a dog is a tie, you cannot do what you want and go where you want without considering them first, its not worth it. Which is definitely a valid point of view, I was just looking for some solid advice before I made a final decision, which I am getting so thank you all
     
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  10. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Any dog, even a Toy Breed, does need adequate exercise.

    Jack Russell Terriers are an extremely active, high energy breed. Mine has an hours exercise in a morning and 3 hours out around our livery yard in the afternoon, plus access all day and evening to my very large garden and that isn't too much for her, so I'm not surprised you and a JR weren't a fit.
     
  11. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    Does it have to be a dog?? TBH reading your home situation it sounds like a cat might fit you better. They are just as loving and good company, esp if you get one of the more doggy breeds!
    Also I def dont want to pry but will you be able to look after it for 15-20 years?? smaller breeds do live a long time and if you cant commit to that long then there are alot of ex puppy farm dogs that need a retirement home.


    Also to add my Chihuahuas have had over an hour and a half walks today and they are still running around. They can be happy with much less but you do find they get more yappy and troublesome if they dont burn some energy off and get out and about.
     
  12. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Chis are busy little dogs. Often perceived as lap dogs and yes they enjoy attention from owners but sitting and doing nothing or expecting to waiting is not really their thing.

    The KC describe the dogs as bold and saucy, I prefer sassy.

    I actually think there are more behaviour problems that arise in toy breeds from owners picking them up as it's so much easier to do so, than actually arises in larger dogs. Hence where toy breeds in general can become classed as snappy...problem arises instead of training them like you would with a larger dog let's ignore the dogs behaviour and just pick up the dog...so touch can become somewhat a problem with them.

    Back to chihuahuas specifically, they are full of energy when puppies and as I say busy little dogs. My youngest was a private re-home at 8 months one of the reasons being because she was hard work, and she was in to everything and was chewing everything she could get hold of...so it was so good that her previous home did actually treat her like a dog...as to me honestly she was the calmest puppy I had ever had being used to terriers.

    I find a well raised chi to have confidence to over come most things so adapting to a wheelchair wouldn't phase them as a rule, like most dogs. Plus I find my toy breeds seem to have better spacial awareness than the other breeds of dogs I have owned. However, I haven't yet owned one from a young puppy, so as a puppy this I would be weary of to a point but no one has yet to have tripped over or accidently stood on a foot of a dog however my other dogs I have previously owned and my lurcher I own now. Well that's a complete different story.

    Most chihuahuas enjoy good walks as well as mental stimulation. As they are inquisitive and a very secure garden is needed due to their size. Especially when puppies as they are a toy breed.

    My only one concern, is the health of the actual breed and also finding a good breeder. There are a variety of health tests that only recommended so most breeders do not opt to do them. I would rather find a breeder that did. Plus I would only go to a breeder that regimes puppy's at 12 weeks, physical development of chihuahuas is slower...hence the lateness of leaving mum. Temperament is highly important too...nervousness is not a breed trait and it's horrible seeing you breeds especially chi's clutched in the arms of someone shivering in fear. This shouldn't be how they are at all.

    I am not saying it cannot work, or they are a joy to own.
     
  13. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I think that's a really good suggestion ! If I wasn't in a position to have dogs I would love a Ragdoll or Maine Coon cat, well I would anyway. They are so full of character , on the whole very affectionate too, and dare I say it, slightly more independent than dogs.
     
  14. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    Again, thanks for the replies, Im not a cat person so thats out, nobody can say what they're health is going to be like in 15 to 20 years. But at the moment, Im able to do things and always have from either a kneeling or sitting down position that most able bodied people, would have thought impossible and consider myself no different from anybody else and live completely independently.
     
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  15. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I think a cat sounds a much better idea. No dog is going to be ok with running round a stationary wheelchair on the lead. No wonder the JRT did not work out. It does not sound like you want the tie of a dog either. A cat is still a tie up to a point but much easier to ask someone to pop in and feed it and it will not mind being left for a few hours either.
     
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  16. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    I was never stationary with the JRT, it would just always run around the chair and try to escape the leash even with other people walking it even after several months of trying to training the dog even with an attachable pole extension and shortened leash, didnt solve the problem.
     
  17. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    Would you be entitled to an assistance dog? They would be specially trained.
     
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  18. cljones81

    cljones81 PetForums Newbie

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    Probably not, as a living completely independently otherwise, I was simply looking for advice of course I would put in the time to train the dog to walk with the wheelchair and exercise it properly
     
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  19. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    If you bring up a puppy from young it would become accustomed to your wheelchair but nothing is certain.
    As has been said , it depends on the temperament ,some are very nervous and others can be a real handful.
     
  20. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    That's what I was thinking. I ragdoll cat would be the perfect companion.