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Differences in cat registry bodies

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Rufus15, Jan 15, 2018.


  1. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    In the UK, there are four registries: the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy (GCCF), The International Cat Association (TICA), Felis Britannica (a UK branch of Fédération Internationale Féline or FIFe), and the Cat Fancy Association (CFA). GCCF is a UK only registry, TICA, FIFe and CFA are international.

    This thread aims to highlight different aspects of each association, including which breeds each registry recognises, how breeders obtain a cattery name, links to available clubs within each registry, and links to show calendars with a brief overview of how showing works within each registry.



    Registration conditions for all registries

    In order for kittens to be registered with any registry, the parents must be on the Active Register with permission from the parents' breeders to produce offspring. Parents are placed on the Active Register if they themselves come from Active Register parents only. Kittens on the Non-Active Register are not meant to be bred from, and their offspring cannot be registered. It is extremely important that buyers check the registration documents of parent cats for Active status.

    Buyers should receive card issued by the relevant registry with their kitten's name on it, parentage, breeder's details, colour, and registration number. Buyers can then transfer the kitten into their name should they wish. See this thread for examples of pedigree papers.

    NB: A family tree or genealogy is not proof of a registered pedigree, the only proof is a registry issued document.

    All registries recommend that kittens should be rehomed at a minimum of 13 weeks, after the second lot of vaccinations. Rehoming at this age allows the kitten crucial socialisation time with its mother and siblings. This is recommended for all kittens, not just pedigrees.

    Please also note, vets cannot register kittens with a registry. Only the breeder that is the registered owner of the dam can register kittens, either with their own cattery prefix or suffix purchased from the registry, or with an administration prefix (GCCF and FIFe only).


    GCCF

    As mentioned previously, this is a UK only registry and is often (but not always) the preferred registry for UK breeders.


    Recognised Breeds

    GCCF has the fewest number of recognised breeds of all the registries, at just 39 breeds. Recognised breeds under GCCF are:
    • Abyssinian
    • Asian
    • Australian Mist
    • Aztec
    • Balinese
    • Bengal
    • Birman
    • British Shorthair (incl. Longhair)
    • Burmese
    • Chartreux
    • Cornish Rex
    • Devon Rex
    • Egyptian Mau
    • Exotic Shorthair
    • Korat
    • La Perm
    • Maine Coon
    • Manx
    • Nebelung
    • Norwegian Forest Cat
    • Ocicat
    • Oriental
    • Persian
    • RagaMuffin
    • Ragdoll
    • Russian
    • Selkirk Rex
    • Siamese
    • Siberian
    • Singpura
    • Snowshoe
    • Sokoke
    • Somali
    • Sphynx
    • Suffolk
    • Thai
    • Toyger
    • Tonkinese
    • Turkish Van and Vankedisi
    More details on each breed can be found here.

    Breeding in GCCF

    In order to purchase a cattery name in GCCF, one must generally be a member of a GCCF-affliated club for at least 12 months. There are some clubs that are an exception to this. The club secretary then signs off on the prefix application. GCCF also has the option of using an administration prefix, which changes every year. Only kittens from Active Register matings can be registered.

    Clubs in GCCF

    Clubs represent breeders and owners of cats registered under GCCF and, much like an MP, will take issues raised within the club to the Committee for debate. An individual can join as many clubs as they wish, and one can be either a breeder, an owner, or an interested party in the breed, live in the general area of the club, or indeed live nowhere near and just like the ethos of the club. Most clubs hold an annual show, some are All Breed shows (so all breeds are accepted) and are Breed shows (so only a specific breed is accepted). All GCCF shows also have a section for Household Pets; that is moggies, cats of known pedigree, or cats of pedigree appearance.

    A list of GCCF affiliated clubs can be found here.


    Showing with GCCF

    Unlike other registries, GCCF shows are held on a single day, either a Saturday or a Sunday. They are spread across the whole of the UK, and there are often more than one on any given weekend. The GCCF show calendar can be found here.

    GCCF shows are pen-judged, the only exception to this is the Supreme, which is the biggest show of the GCCF calendar.

    Anyone with a cat can show with GCCF: cats registered with GCCF from birth, cats imported into GCCF from other registries, even moggies! Cats must be registered with (or imported into) GCCF to show in the pedigree section.

    Moggies of all kinds can be shown in the Household Pet section, which is divided into Household Pet and Pedigree Pet. In order to claim titles in the Household Pet section cats must be registered as a Household Pet, which can be easily done through GCCF's website.

    Titles go in the following order, Champion is for entire cats in breeding programmes, Premier is for neutered pedigrees, and Master Cat is for Household Pet & Pedigree Pet:
    • Champion / Premier / Master Cat
    • Grand Champion / Grand Premier / Grand Master Cat
    • Imperial Grand Champion / Imperial Grand Premier / Imperial Grand Master Cat
    • Olympian Bronze Imperial Grand Champion / Olympian Bronze Imperial Grand Premier / Olympian Bronze Imperial Grand Master Cat
    • Olympian Silver Imperial Grand Champion / Olympian Silver Imperial Grand Premier / Olympian Silver Imperial Grand Master Cat
    • Olympian Gold Imperial Grand Champion / Olympian Gold Imperial Grand Premier / Olympian Gold Imperial Grand Master Cat
    Titles are gained by collecting a set amount of certificates per title across different shows. Reports are issued within the 28 days following a show, giving a judge's feedback on the cats they judged.

    All pens are dressed with 'show whites', and the show is closed to exhibitors and the public between 10am - 12:30pm (or 1pm depending on the show), to ensure safe judging and anonymity for the main Open and Title classes.

    Shows vary in cost, but generally a basic show entry will include penning, a main class, the best of breed, and two side classes. One can expect an entry for a single cat in a single pen, with a catalogue, to be around £50. This price includes any rosettes or prize cards you might win.


    TICA

    TICA is currently the world's largest registry of pedigree cats, and its headquarters are in Texas, USA.

    Recognised breeds

    TICA currently recognises 71 different breeds, more information can be found on each breed here. Championship breeds in TICA are as follows:

    • Abyssinian
    • American Bobtail (longhair and shorthair)
    • American Curl (longhair and shorthair)
    • American Shorthair
    • American Wirehair
    • Australian Mist
    • Balinese
    • Bengal (longhair and shorthair)
    • Birman
    • Bombay
    • British Shorthair (incl. British Longhair)
    • Burmese
    • Burmilla (longhair and shorthair)
    • Chartreux
    • Chausie
    • Cornish Rex
    • Cymric
    • Devon Rex
    • Donskoy
    • Egyptian Mau
    • Exotic Shorthair
    • Havana
    • Himalayan
    • Japanese Bobtail (longhair and shorthair)
    • Khaomanee
    • Korat
    • Kurilian Bobtail (longhair and shorthair)
    • La Perm (incl shorthair)
    • Maine Coon (including polydactyl)
    • Manx
    • Minuet (incl longhair)
    • Munchkin (incl longhair)
    • Nebelung
    • Norwegian Forest Cat
    • Ocicat
    • Oriental (longhair and shorthair)
    • Persian
    • Peterbald
    • Pixiebob (incl longhair)
    • RagaMuffin
    • Ragdoll
    • Russian Blue
    • Savannah
    • Scottish Fold (incl longhair)
    • Scottish Straight (incl longhair)
    • Selkirk Rex (incl longhair)
    • Siamese
    • Siberian
    • Singpura
    • Snowshoe
    • Somali
    • Sphynx
    • Thai
    • Toyger
    • Tonkinese
    • Turkish Angora
    • Turkish Van

    Breeding with TICA


    Prefixes or suffixes can be purchased from TICA via their website. Breeders must have purchased a prefix or suffix in order to register kittens, and kittens can only be registered from Active Register matings.

    Clubs in TICA

    Similarly to GCCF, some clubs under TICA run cat an annual show per club throughout the year. Unlike GCCF, TICA club members generally have a role in running the club, membership of clubs is not an open invitation. A list of clubs in the UK can be found here, blue listed clubs are show-holders.

    Showing with TICA

    The TICA calendar can be found here. The calendar lists events held across the world under TICA, but a simple Ctrl + F and typing in UK will help identify UK shows.

    TICA shows are ring judged, and each show has its own number of rings. This means that cats are taken up to the ring when their classes are called, and are judged with the public being able to view and hear feedback. Exhibitors can either purchase their own show pen, or hire one at the show. Each TICA show has breed sections for pedigrees, and a section for Household Pet. Cats must be registered with TICA to gain titles, but can enter one show as a means to try it out.

    Titles in TICA are split between Champion for breeding pedigree cats, Alter for neutered pedigree cats, and Master for Household Pets:

    • Champion / Alter / Master
    • Grand Champion / Grand Alter / Grand Master
    • Double Grand Champion / Double Grand Alter / Double Grand Master
    • Triple Grand Champion / Triple Grand Alter / Triple Grand Master
    • Quadruple Grand Champion / Quadruple Grand Alter / Quadruple Grand Master
    • Supreme Grand Champion / Supreme Grand Alter / Supreme Grand Master

    Shows under TICA will typically be two or three days in length, with a set number of rings on each day. Points are awarded in each ring, and titles are gained when a cat gains the appropriate amount of points.

    TICA shows typically cost around £50 per day which includes all rings and resulting rosettes. TICA exhibitors typically provide their own penning, but pens can be hired at the show if necessary.

    More information on showing with TICA can be found here.


    FIFe

    FIFe, or Fédération Internationale Féline, is a predominantly European cat registry body, with members from 40 different countries including members from the Middle East, the Americas, and Asia. Felis Britannica is a UK-based organisation which represents a federation of cat clubs across the UK, all of whom are a part of FIFe.


    Recognised breeds

    FIFe currently recognises 48 different breeds, these are:

    • Abyssinian
    • American Curl (longhair & shorthair)
    • Balinese
    • Bengal
    • British Shorthair
    • British Longhair
    • Burmilla
    • Burmese
    • Chartreux
    • Cornish Rex
    • Cymric
    • Devon Rex
    • Don Sphynx
    • Egyptian Mau
    • European
    • Exotic
    • German Rex
    • Japanese Bobtail
    • Kurilian Bobtail (longhair & shorthair)
    • Korat
    • LaPerm (longhair & shorthair)
    • Maine Coon
    • Manx
    • Neva Masquerade
    • Norwegian Forest Cat
    • Ocicat
    • Oriental Longhair
    • Oriental Shorthair
    • Persian
    • Peterbald
    • Ragdoll
    • Russian Blue
    • Sacred Birman
    • Selkirk Rex (longhair & shorthair)
    • Siamese
    • Siberian
    • Singapura
    • Snowshoe
    • Sokoke
    • Somali
    • Sphynx
    • Thai
    • Turkish Angora
    • Turkish Van
    More information on recognised breeds can be found here.

    Breeding with FIFe

    In order to gain a cattery name under FIFe, breeders must be members of the member organisation of their home country. In the UK, breeders must apply to Felis Britannica. In order to apply through Felis Britannica, breeders must be a full member of a club belonging to Felis Britannica. Kittens can also be registered under an administration prefix if the breeder does not yet have a cattery name.

    Similarly to the previous registries, only kittens from Active Register parents can be registered.

    More information on registering under Felis Britannica can be found here.

    Clubs in FIFe

    There are three recognised clubs under FIFe, the Viking Cat Club, the Garden of England club, and The Scottish Cat Association. Each club is all breed, so all breeds recognised under FIFe are accepted into the clubs.

    Clubs affiliated with Felis Britannica can be found here.

    Showing with FIFe

    Shows are held by the three clubs throughout the year and at various different locations throughout the UK. The show calendar can be found here.

    FIFe shows are ring judged, and exhibitors are required to take their cats to the appropriate ring for judging when called. Exhibitors and the public are able to hear feedback as the cats are judged, and shows have sections for all recognised breeds. In order to claim titles, cats must be registered with FIFe.

    Titles are given to breeding and neutered cats only, household pets do not gain titles under FIFe. Titles for breeding cats are Champion, and titles for neuters are Premier. The title levels are:
    • Champion / Premier
    • International Champion / International Premier
    • Grand International Champion / Grand International Premier
    • Supreme Champion / Supreme Premier
    FIFe shows typically run across two days. Titles are obtained by gaining certificates at each level, where only one certificate can be issued per winning cat per day. If three certificates are needed, cats are required to enter three different days. If a cat needs one certificate and gains it on the first day, they can be upgraded to the next title class for the second day.

    Note: GCCF cats can be shown under FIFe, more information can be found on the link given below.

    Shows are approximately £60 standard fee for two days, with an early bird option. This includes a metal pen, a catalogue on show day, and a single exhibitor admission. Exhibitors are able to decorate their pens or provide their own.

    More information on showing with FIFe can be found here.


    CFA

    The CFA is a relatively new registry in the UK but is very popular internationally. It has over 600 member clubs and holds roughly 400 shows worldwide in their show season.

    Recognised breeds

    The CFA recognises 42 breeds, these are:

    • Abyssinian
    • American Bobtail
    • American Curl
    • American Shorthair
    • American Wirehair
    • Balinese
    • Bengal
    • Birman
    • Bombay
    • British Shorthair
    • Burmese
    • Burmilla
    • Chartreux
    • Colourpoint Shorthair
    • Cornish Rex
    • Devon Rex
    • Egyptian Mau
    • European Burmese
    • Exotic
    • Havana Brown
    • Japanese Bobtail
    • Korat
    • La Perm
    • Maine Coon
    • Manx
    • Norwegian Forest Cat
    • Ocicat
    • Oriental
    • Persian
    • Ragamuffin
    • Ragdoll
    • Russian Blue
    • Scottish Fold
    • Selkirk Rex
    • Siamese
    • Siberian
    • Singpura
    • Somali
    • Sphynx
    • Tonkinese
    • Turkish Angora
    • Turkish Van
    More information on CFA breeds can be found here.

    Breeding with CFA

    Cattery names under CFA can be purchased through their website, and must be renewed every 5 years. As with all registries, only kittens born from Active Register parents can be registered. More information can be found here.

    Clubs in CFA

    Similarly to the other registries, clubs represent members in the CFA. Members of the public are welcome to join CFA-affiliated clubs. There are currently two clubs in the UK, information on which can be found here and here. At the time of writing, only one club holds shows, of which there are two this year (2018).

    Showing with CFA

    As stated above, there are currently only two shows available under CFA in the UK. There are more worldwide. Information on UK shows can be found on the club page.

    CFA shows are also ring judged, and shows have anything from 4 to 12 rings. Cat are awarded titles based on a points system, although this is a different points system to that of TICA. Household pets can be shown but do not compete for titles.

    Entire cats obtain can obtain the following titles:
    • Champion
    • Grand Champion
    Neutered cats can obtain the following titles:
    • Premier
    • Grand Premier
    More information on titling under CFA can be found here.

    Entry to the show is £60 for the two days, and includes rings but not penning. There are opportunities for cheaper early bird entry and subsequent cats entered also receive discounts. Exhibitors are able to decorate their hired pens or provide their own.



    This concludes the post, if anyone feels I have missed anything please do let me know :)
     
    #1 Rufus15, Jan 15, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2018
    Gallifreyangirl and Brrosa like this.
  2. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    With TICA you can become a Member which entitles you to vote on certain matters such as who your Regional Director will be and get discounts on almost everything from kitten registrations to certified pedigrees. You can become a member for 1 year, 5 years or for life with prices ranging from $40 for 1 year, $180 for 5 years and $1000 for lifetime membership. However, you do not have to be a member to register kittens or show with TICA. Although an international registry, TICA is based in the USA so all prices are in US dollars.

    Cattery (Prefix) Registration (One-Time Only Fee) (member) $75.00, (non member) $80.00
    Cattery Suffix (Per Addition or Deletion on an Existing Registration) $10.00
    Online Breeder Listing $25.00

    Registration of a Cat/Kitten (Without Litter Registration-Certified Pedigree Required) (member) $20.00, (non member) $20.00
    Registration of a Cat/Kitten (From Litter Registration) (member) $10.00, (non member) $12.00
    Registration of a Litter (Dam and Sire TICA Registered) (member) $13.00, (non member) $15.00
    Registration of a Litter (TICA Dam Only) (Certified Pedigree Required on Sire) $16.00 (member), $18.00 (non member)
    Registration of a Household Pet (member) $8.00, (non member) $10.00
    Transfer of Ownership (Any Feline) (member) $13.00, (non member) $15.00
    Certified Pedigree (Three Generation) (member) $25.00, (non Member) $25.00
    Certified Pedigree (Five-Generation) (member) $50.00, (non member) $50.00
    Vertical Pedigree Report (Information on the Littermates of your Cat) (member) $10.00, (non member) $10.00

    REGISTRATION INCENTIVE NEW TICA CATTERIES: 5 individual cat registrations at $15 PLUS a Cattery Registration for $40, Additional Registrations (over 5) $12 each

    TITLES
    Confirmation (Except Supreme Grand Champion/Alter & Supreme Grand Master) Each Title $5.00
    Confirmation (Supreme Grand Champion/Alter & Supreme Grand Master - 8x10 Certificate for Framing) $10.00
    Confirmation (Outstanding Dam - 8x10 Laminated Certificate) $20.00
    Confirmation (Outstanding Sire - 8x10 Laminated Certificate) $25.00
    Confirmation (Lifetime Achievement Award - 8x10 Laminated Certificate) $20.00
    Current Scoring Record (On Individual TICA Cats) Each $5.00
    Confirmation Report (On Individual TICA Cats) Each $10.00
     
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  3. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    If the prices are only in dollars, presumably they vary according to the value of the £.

    Can you clarify some of this? Am I right in thinking that a registration without litter registration is only for those who have not bred the cat themselves or can a breeder just register perhaps one or two in a litter and then provide a certified pedigree and have no litter registration? (I think this illustrates how we sometimes assume things are crystal clear because we have known these things for so long.)
     
  4. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    My understanding of individual cat registration without litter registrations is for when breeders change the affix or suffix of the cat to their own, even though they haven't bred them themselves
     
  5. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    We are going to have to be very careful to mention the registry whenever we make a comment. Presumably you mean in TICA in answer to my question.

    Why should they be able to change the name of the cat?
     
  6. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    Apologies, yes I meant TICA. I don't know why they should, I only know that a cat's prefix/suffix can be changed from one cattery name to another, and reregistered under the new cattery name regardless of who bred it. I can't understand the point in such an option, I only know that it's an available option.
     
  7. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    You will always pay TICA $75 for a prefix. The £ you end up having to pay your end will depend on the exchange rate.

    In TICA you can just register the litter. You are then given Blue Slips which have all the kittens details except a name. You give the blue slip to the kittens owners who can then register the kitten with a name of their choosing. However, I prefer to both register the litter then register each kitten before homing them.

    You can never change the name of a cat in TICA, however an owner may add a suffix to a cats name, for example:
    .
    There are three breeders: Mrs A (Whiskers), Mrs B (Mittens) & Mrs C (Fluffy)
    Mrs A breeds a cat called Whiskers Paddy.
    Mrs B buys him and adds a suffix so he is now Whiskers Paddy of Mittens.
    A while later Mrs B sells him to Mrs C who changes the suffix to her own, so the cat is now Whiskers Paddy of Fluffy

    You cannot remove the breeders prefix. Adding suffixes is very common in the US.
     
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  8. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    Can you explain the cat registration (no litter registration certified pedigree required)

    Many thanks.
     
  9. huckybuck

    huckybuck Feline Forum Fashionista

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    Not sure how relevant but just for your information and from the perspective of a kitten purchaser..

    I tried to report a breeder who was registered with Tica for lying about gene testing on their website. Unfortunately I have conclusive evidence that they did.
    I had no response from the registry at all despite both writing and emailing them and the cattery still continues to be registered with Tica to this day, although the breeder is now her daughter. I know there are probably some unethical breeders within the GCCF but I wouldn't trust a Tica only registered breeder with a barge pole based on my experience.
     
  10. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    I think we need to get on to the attitudes of the different registries to health testing at a later date because it could become really complicated. Bear with us!
     
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  11. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    Its similar yes. The breeder fills in all the details, sire, dam, date of birth, colour and sex of each kitten. TICA assigns a registration number to each kitten and then sends the breeder a slip for each kitten. These slips can be given to the new owners for them to register their own kitten or, the breeder can register each kitten before they give it to its new owners.
     
  12. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    This happens in all registries unfortunately. GCCF would expect you to pay to raise a complaint of this nature, and only a few breeds have health tests built in to their registration policies. The GCCF itself doesn't decide what tests are mandatory the Breed Advisory Committee does. When it comes to genetic testing the onus is always on the buyer to demand to see proof.
     
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  13. Tigermoon

    Tigermoon PetForums VIP

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    Sorry @QOTN I missed this question. This is when a cat is registered with another registry and you wish to register it with TICA. So basically its the same as 'importing' a cat into GCCF.
     
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  14. huckybuck

    huckybuck Feline Forum Fashionista

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    With hindsight I wish I had gone to trading standards as she clearly advertised that her kittens were gene tested negative so was offering mis leading information - it was one of the reasons I went to her. With hindsight I would always ask for proof these days.

    I would happily have paid incidentally.
     
  15. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    And you have to send a fee with your complaint.

    "There is a £15 administration fee for processing all complaints. If the complaint relates to cat welfare or can be dealt with under the fixed penalty system there is no further charge. For all other complaints a further fee of £160 is charged which may be refunded if the complaint is found proved by the Disciplinary Committee. Please enclose the fee with your forms."
     
  16. huckybuck

    huckybuck Feline Forum Fashionista

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    This was Tica 7 years ago and I would happily have paid a fee if I had been asked.
     
  17. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    £160? That's quite a fee if you don't get it back. If they were advertising DNA tested kittens and you could prove they weren't as in the kitten had the gene it shouldn't have had I would have thought trading standards might have been the way to go.
     
  18. Rufus15

    Rufus15 PetForums VIP

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    @huckybuck if you have cats from gene tested n/n lines the way through the pedigree then biology would dictate that no resulting kittens would be able to be positive or carriers. This reasoning is what some MC breeders use to not test their breeding cats - parents, grandparents, great grandparents are all n/n so all cats produced in that line will be n/n. This isn't something I agree with as tests are cheap in the grand scheme of breeding, so I think it would have depended on the wording on the website.
     
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  19. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    Is this worth making into a sticky, & if so, would it be better in the breeding section?
     
  20. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Yes in time but from my point of view it's a very early work in progress.
     
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