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Did I do the right thing?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by grandad, Apr 28, 2011.


  1. grandad

    grandad PetForums VIP

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    I've been out with the dawg for an evening walk and came face to face with a large dog, (rhodesian rigdgeback/cross) with the owner beig towed behind. (it was a fine specimen of a dog all muscle and lovely coat) The dog was wearing a flat coller and was attached to a very thick chained leash. The owner had no control what so ever.
    My dog was off lead and walking to heel. As we crossed the other dog made a lunge for my fella (the owner couldn't restrain their dog) it put it's head on top of my dog's neck and was growling, the growl was a very deep growl. My dog froze, froze to the extent that it was rigid and wouldn't dare flinch. It's the first time I've ever seen my dog that rigid and frozen.
    The other dog owner was saying NO, NO, NO, NO, NO . I asked them to be quiet and to keep still. I stood about a yard away and waited for the other dog to relax a little and then called my dog to heel, which he did. Major catastrophe averted. Any movement on my part towards my dog or the other dog, I think would have resulted in a blood bath. I was tempted at one point to intervene, but kept calm and luckily it turned out okay.
    Because the situation ended quietly and i got my dog back to heel without a scar, I think I did the right thing.
    Would you have done anything differently?
     
  2. Dogless

    Dogless PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like perfect management of the situation. Many people would have panicked, tried to intervene and escalated things I would think.
     
  3. Hard to say what I would have done in the same situation - but seeing as the other dog was leashed I am pretty amazed that the owner could not have brought his dog under control or at the very least diverted his attentions Did you speak to the owner afterwards? Is the dog agressive both on and off lead do you know?
     
    #3 DoubleTrouble, Apr 28, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 28, 2011
  4. Pheonix*Ella

    Pheonix*Ella PetForums Junior

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    Wow -I think you did really well!
    wish my evening had been like that.

    I was just reading about the lunge and neck grab on a website after my dog did it to another tonight!

    There seems to be this one dog she doesn't like as just as I'd let her off with her buddies this flipping dog came into view. Typical. anyway she was off and I was too far away by then to do anything!

    On the advice of my friend who was with me (walking her ridgeback!) I've just bought a whistle on ebay as me calling her DID NOT help and just fuelled the fire!

    Well done you I say, for keeping calm and sorting it out. Dog whisperer!
     
  5. Irish Setter Gal

    Irish Setter Gal PetForums Senior

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    Nice one Grandad, when's the TV performances start.

    I'd have you on my team any day with skills like that ;)
     
  6. RobD-BCactive

    RobD-BCactive PetForums VIP

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    Yes, you spotted quite a few "warning" signs that I use, so I would have tried to either pass at a significant distance, may be turn away or round to take another route, or if that's not possible had my dog still to my side, away from the lunging dog blocking it.

    Fairly frequently I see often quite elderly people struggling with large dogs, glaring and looking unsociable, but mostly I can avoid any close encounter. Asking the oncoming dog walker who appears in difficulties whether precautions are needed tends to be futile, as mostly they seem more concerned about covering embaressment at their dog's behaviour than solving it for the future.

    In my view, there's no significant gain to greeting poorly controlled threatening dogs, and a huge downside if it goes wrong. Carrying a stick can help considerably, where the owners are irresponsibly allowing "bullying" dog behaviours but mostly it seems like fear based aggression down to poor socialisation.
     
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