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desperate puppy training......

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Nutella, Jan 8, 2012.


  1. Nutella

    Nutella PetForums Newbie

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    Has any one else got advice - have read the advice on house training and not sure what I am doing wrong - have been told to keep outside just for toilet at moment so that he realises that s where he does it, but when in house and he starts to go to the toilet, picking him up to take outside just makes him stop - its becoming stressful for him and me ! Have tried going out at prime times but he never wants to go then, saving it for as soon as I am not watching him indoors. Hows is he going to learn that poo should be outdoors? Have read that if we stay outside too long he will think of it as a playground........... He came home on Monday, am I being impatient - The guide books make it sound easy
     
  2. missnaomi

    missnaomi PetForums VIP

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    Someone will be along soon who knows more than me...but to speed things along and avoid accidents you have to keep taking them outside ALL the time, not just at prime times. When we had puppies I never seemed to be able to sit down and do anything, as soon as I did it was time for another toilet trip! It feels like your whole life revolves around it for a few weeks.

    I also used a crate during the night, but I still took the pup outside every time he or she woke up...and every hour or so. Lots of people do use crates and lots of people don't, but I think it helped speed up toilet training and was generally useful...others disagree, I think it's a personal choice.

    After they eat, wake up, play, jump...move...pretty much everything. And when they do go outside act like it's the most amazing and fantastic thing ever. You'll learn the way that they sniff about first and you'll soon be able to spot the signs.

    You will get there, I think different breeds of dog take different amounts of time, and even within a breed, all are unique. I think you have to provide the maximum amount of opportunities for them to get it right, so that they learn what they're supposed to do and this means pretty much constant vigilance!!

    What sort of puppy do you have? :)
    Naomi x
     
  3. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    If you're not watching him indoors, he should be in a crate, or tied to your belt by a light lead about 6 foot long. It will only slow down the process of house training if he has the opportunity to make mistakes. Stay outside as long as it takes, but don't play with him, just keep it low key. It's a miserable time of year for house training. Next time I get a pup, it will be in spring.
     
  4. Nutella

    Nutella PetForums Newbie

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    He's a beautiful cocker spaniel.....well behaved in many ways already - will sit back and wait for you to come to him instead of jumping all over. I have been with him almost 24/7.....he sleeps around 4-5 hours through night. I am just a little confused - do I stay outside with him until he performs - I was outside for over an hour today with no results, and he was getting tired - or pick him up and take him out as he is going to do something - this is what seems to stress him. Guess I will just have to be patient, and keep going out at every opportunity:)
     
  5. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Have you still got any paper or pads down? If you have and that was what he was using at the breeders then that could be confusing him as he will think its the place to go still in the house because that is whatl he has always done.

    Once you get one or two successes it usually does start to get easier. If you and everything else is now making it all a tense stressy afair again thats not going to help.

    Take him out every 30/45 minutes, more frequent for shorter periods works better then infrequent for longer periods I have found. If he starts to go you then use a name for it in a happy voice, used every single time they associate the word with going in the end and later you can use it as a toilet cue. When finished then lots of praise and give treats. You need to take them out after drinking, eating play and sleeping too. If he has an accident dont tell him off it can make them nervous about going in front of you, and they wont go, or it makes them sneak off and do it out of sight. Any accidents clean up with a special odour/stain remover any smells left can encourage going in the same places. If going out in the garden has really turned into a tense nightmare and if after more attempts he still isnt going. Try taking out a ball or a toy, take your treats too but just try to treat it like a play session and throw the ball. You will likely find that once its relaxed and he has played a little he will absent mindedly go, then you can use the cue, word and praise and treat and be on your way. Its that start and another one or two successes thats needed.

    At night personally I slept downstairs and put mine out when they woke or stirred it was only for a couple of weeks maybe a little more, and over this time got less and less until they went through to early morning. If he is within sight and sound of you you can do this. Some people set an alarm and pop them out that way once or twice, others just leave paper down, it can still work just takes longer. In my experience a lot of intense trips and only going out is quicker and makes thing clearer to the pup. Although a lot of work at first it soon pays off.
     
    #5 Sled dog hotel, Jan 8, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  6. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Forgot to add look out for circling scratching or sniffing at the floor, these are signs they are looking for somewhere to go usually so get him out quick then. You dont always see this until later though. When they are smaller they dont recognise the need to go always, or realise too late. Because they are small to they have limited capacity to hold large amounts and for long periods of time. As they get bigger though this does improve so they need to go less and can hold it for longer, and eventually they recognise the need too.

    It is early days, some pups like kids just get if quicker then others. You will find with pups and training too, that often just when you think they will never get it they suddenly do and then all falls into place really quickly, so dont despair yet, just be consistent.
     
  7. Manoy Moneelil

    Manoy Moneelil PetForums VIP

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    Hello Nutella and welcome to the site as no one else has offered a welcome.

    I'm sure it's a coincidence but there was just an advert for Nutella on the TV.

    The thing about books is that they seldom fully communicate the necessary level of repetition that is required to allow the pup to understand what is required in a particular situation.

    And for a pup so new to you and your house the sudden appearance of the garden with all it's smells and newness will distract any thought about toilet.

    The secret that you seek is that there is no secret but plain old fashion repetition.

    Waiting an hour outside is a bit long I think but it does clearly show your heart is dedicated to the project. I would suggest using a little trick to encourage the pup to "go" where you want him to. Dogs are motivated 80% by smell, get the smallest dab of another dog's poo or urine and use that to mark the spot in your garden - your dog will smell the other dog's scent and have the desire to cover up that dog's smell with his own.

    Sounds gross but works well :eek:

    Personally when our now 6 month old GR pup was going through this stage we would give him 5 minutes of waiting time then return to whatever was happening before and watch for the signs of "I want toilet". The circling looking and sniffing at the floor, or the squat (getting a bit late at that point).

    Give praise as he goes in the right place.

    Any indoor accidents are best cleaned with cool water and bio-washing powder, to clear the odour use a hand spray with clear distilled vinegar. :thumbsup:

    I assure you the stress will pass for you both, you are doing the right things and it will just click into place.
     
  8. Nutella

    Nutella PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks to all of you........it was a lonely night last night ! I am here alone with puppy at moment as husband is away - good to know there are people I can call on:)
    Yes it is getting better - last night at god knows what time we had the first poo in the garden - I will take this as encouraging and be ever vigilant !
     
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    When he does it outdoors, make sure he knows he's a clever boy and give him a nice treat.
    Those first days are very hard work. You'll probably notice a big improvement when he gets to about 12 weeks, when he starts to get more muscular control.
     
  10. troublestrouble

    troublestrouble PetForums Senior

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    once he starts going outside he will soon quicken up. it took me and Trouble months to crack it and i think i was doing everything wrong but we're only having a few night time accidents now after 4.5 weeks.

    keep going you will get there and once he starts walking outside that will help even more. we give her a biscuit if she goes on walkies, lots of fuss if she goes in the garden and a stern look if she's been in the house without us noticing.

    watch out for any signs he wants go and if he's sniffing round the back door then let him out instantly and give him praise. it'l get much better and you'll wonder what all the fuss was about soon enough! :cool:
     
  11. Nat28

    Nat28 PetForums Member

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    QualsI have had my puppy for a month n bit so i know how you feel. I got advised to take puppy out very frequently throughout day. E.g every half hour to begin with. Dont wait outside for ages. If he doesnt do anythin infive mins come back in place him in a crate(if your not using one i highly recommend it) then take him out ten mins later. A puppy will not want to soil itsbed.. it takes time and patience and im just about there with malkie. I set my alarm throughout th night. If you do have a crate make ita great place for the puppy by giving treats and never using it as a punishment.another thing i was told is during the night a puppy can hold its urine 1 hour for each month.e.g 3 month old puppy equals 3 hours. Hopei canhelp
     
  12. Debxan

    Debxan PetForums Member

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    I sympathise with you as it is not a good time of year as you say for house training.

    I second what others have said and when I had Monty I kept taking him outside and making a huge fuss every time he did anything. He slept in a crate by the bed and as soon as he stirred during the night I rushed him outside. Not much fun in the rain of course but I kept an old pair of shoes by the door - and an umbrella! It worked in a few weeks.

    I think the crate really does help though as they don't like to mess in their beds.

    Best of luck, I am sure it will fall into place very soon
     
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