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Desperate for advice re elderly dog!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by nick09, Jul 13, 2009.


  1. nick09

    nick09 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I have 2 border terriers who love one another to bits. The eldest, Jessie is nearly 13 and over the past 6 months has started soiling in the house. It started off with the odd wee now and again which I could cope with - we had her checked by the vet and ruled out anything that could be causing it health wise so put it down to old age and making sure we put her outside regularly rather than wait for her to tell us which she used to do. Anyway, we now are faced with her pooing in the house. She has done this regularly over the past few months, it isn't confined to one spot and even though the doors are open in the kitchen and conservatory so she can easily get out when she needs to she still poos inside and very often in the doorway of the open door!!! All she needed to do was take a couple more steps and it would be outside.

    Obviously this is causing a lot of problems not to mention the health implications as I have 2 young kids and am constantly cleaning the carpets in the hope I am clearing it all up properly. Jessie no longer wants to go for walks and I can't force her as she refuses to go even with loads of encouragement. As soon as she sees the lead she puts the brakes on and will not even entertain the idea. She spends most of the day sleeping, only gets up to toilet which most of the time is in the house unless I physically pick her up and put her outside. The only time she is lively is when someone comes to the door and when food is on offer. She still has a fairly good appetite as long as it is tinned food not dry. The vet has done numerous checks to no avail. She now regularly vomits yellow bile (again on the carpet!!) and I am loathe to take her back to the vet as I know from her regular checks this all seems to be an age thing.

    I have had her since she was 8 weeks old and love her to bits so not sure if anyone can give any further suggestions with regards behaviour and dealing with this or if it is just a development of old age and I have to cope with it.

    Any help or advice appreciated. Thanks, Nicola
     
  2. hazel pritchard

    hazel pritchard PetForums VIP

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    Hi i had an elderly corgi who got like this ,after many tests the vet said it was colitus(spelling not sure about ) her poo was sometimes frothy aswell,she was put on meds from the vet and it helped although as she got older she had it more often,she was like your dog ,didnt want to go out,and was very keen on her food,so we used to put her lead on and have dog biscuits in our hand and coax her to walk,when she had got over an attack of colitus she returned to her old self untill the next attack of it,
     
  3. r_neupert

    r_neupert PetForums Senior

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    We had two family border collies that started to go like this in their old age. We've still got one, but she's very much lost her marbles and partially blind and deaf. The diagnosis for the pair of them was kidney issues (litter sisters), one seemed to have it worse than the other and weed and pooped pretty much whenever she needed to. Must point out it wasn't "normal" poops though as i don't want to worry you.

    I do empathise, because i remember many a barefoot step into dog poop. We used to lay newspapers in the areas they were more keen to poop, but it isn't a solution really in the long run.

    It definately sounds like something isn't right - whether it be something simple like arthritis setting in and she is less keen to move around, or whether something internally needs attention. I would either take her back or get a second opinion. If you get a big prescription like our dogs did, ask for the prescription and then buy it online, you'll save a lot of cash in the long run.

    In the meantime, can you schedule times in the garden i.e. every hour take her out into the garden to "release", rather than leaving the door open. By leaving the door open are not seperating in from out. May be worth a try...
     
  4. aurora

    aurora PetForums Senior

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    Hi, at 13 years of age she is probably slowing down due to her age, and may have started doggie dementia, i.e forgetting to go out side like she use to, at 13 her joints may ache and this making her not want to go for walks etc.. Our border collie that we had was 17 half when we had to have her put to sleep, she had some doggie dementia towards the end. Our collie still like small walks some days, but others the was happy to wander around in the garden, as she had arthritis and some days were better than others.

    good luck. :)
     
  5. Mese

    Mese PetForums VIP

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    Our Border collie Buddy started to poop indoors when he was 14 yrs old. He already had arthritis and a heart murmur and his sight was going ... this peeing and pooing in the house went on for over a year , until he passed.
    It sometimes got on my nerves constantly cleaning up after him & washing his bedding , though id never say anything to him , but then id look at him and see how upset he was that he'd made a mess in the house and all was forgiven .... it wasnt his fault he got old and couldnt help it

    I dont have any advice hun other than just do what you are doing already , grit your teeth at the times when it annoys you and love your furbaby :)
    if your Jessie is anything like my Bud , she already feels bad enough herself about what she is doing , poor love
     
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