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Definition of "Cereals"

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by SEVEN_PETS, Jan 7, 2012.


  1. SEVEN_PETS

    SEVEN_PETS PetForums VIP

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    Hey

    What would you class as "cereals"? Does this include rice? Or is cereals just a collective term for wheat, maize etc? If I'm looking for cereal free foods, should I avoid rice?
     
  2. luvmydogs

    luvmydogs PetForums VIP

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    Yes it includes rice. For a cereal free food there should be no rice in it.
     
  3. SixStar

    SixStar Banned

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    Ditto to what luvmydogs has said :) Oats and barley - in alot of even the higher end foods, should be avoided too if looking to avoid cereals - aswell as rice (including brown), wheat and maize.
     
  4. mel@fish

    mel@fish PetForums Senior

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    Yep, rice is a cereal. If you're looking for a cereal free then look at fish4dogs salmon and potato. This is what I feed. You need some carb in the diet and a lot of dogs are starting to have intolerances to rice, hence the use of potato in some diets.:)
     
  5. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    mel@fish :
    • The Association of American Feed Control OfficialsÂ’ (AAFCO) nutrient profiles show that carbohydrates are not essential for dogs and cats, and that no minimum level of carbohydrate is needed in their diets.
    • According to Dr. David S. Kronfeld (animal nutritionist), carbohydrates need not be supplied to adult dogs, even those working hard as the liver is easily able to synthesize sufficient glucose (from protein and fats).

    The only reason I have come across to add carbohydrates is as a means of adding a cheap filler ingredient.
     
  6. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Yes rice is a cereal. I count cereals as seeds grown from members of the graminae (grass) family. I think it's best to avoid all cereals (it's worked for my dog's digestive problems) but some dogs are OK with cereals that don't contain gluten - mainly found in wheat.

    Soya is a bean rather than a cereal, but it seems to be indigestible to many dogs, so I'd avoid that too.
     
  7. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    Cereals are grasses, but of course not all grasses are cereals! ;)

    Maize (corn)
    Oats
    Barley
    Rye
    Wheat
    Sorghum
    Millet
    Spelt

    are all classified as cereals.

    there are also other names which some cereals hide under such as Prairie Meal which is a by product of maize production.

    There are also other grains such as Quinoa which, although not technically a true cereal, are a carbohydrate.

    Cereals are more than a "cheap filler" they are a source of incomplete protein, and fibre,.

    The gut needs SOME fibre for the production of SCFA essential to intestinal health, but this can be better provided via other means such as sugar beet pulp or bananas for example.

    If you choose to feed cereals then oats is the grain of choice (if there can be such a thing,) followed by rice.

    Soya is a pulse, it is a thyroid inhibitor and a prime trigger of intestinal gas, so should be avoided.

    HTH
     
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  8. Helbo

    Helbo PetForums VIP

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    I've found rice is usually listed spearately to 'cereals' - i think although it is still a filler it's considered to be one of the lesser evils as most dogs don't have any adverse reactions to it like they could with wheat for example.
     
  9. PennyGC

    PennyGC PetForums VIP

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    I have had a dog with a rice allergy!

    Dogs have no requirement for carbohydrates although many can tolerate them they can cause weight gain.

    Other vegetables are preferred really to carbs - although potatoes of course are very high in carbs... carrots shouldn't be fed excessively as they're also high in carbs (very sweet) and bananas are the same.

    Sweet potatoes and other squashes are better.

    In an ideal world kibble would be cereal and carb very low content with protein and vegetables very high.
     
  10. luvmydogs

    luvmydogs PetForums VIP

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    hmm, now I'm wondering if I should introduce carbs to my skinny girl!
     
  11. Manoy Moneelil

    Manoy Moneelil PetForums VIP

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    When talking of the tinned and kibble products they use whatever bulk filler carbohydrate they can get cheaply depending on season and commodity prices.


    All of these supermarket shelf 'foods' have a range of ingredients and vary the exact percentages of cereals within a set of limits based on what works out cheapest that month.


    If black truffles were cheap enough they would invent a reason that they should form the basis of all pet food. As it stands if they could use expanded polystyrene they would do.

    [​IMG]

    :cool:
     
  12. Manoy Moneelil

    Manoy Moneelil PetForums VIP

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    Try green tripe.

    A dog's intestine is designed for meat based diets, not rices and grains.
     
  13. babycham2002

    babycham2002 PetForums VIP

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    Agree with most of above posts.
    Rice being seen as the least evil of the cereals/grains it seems.

    Willow doesnt do well on a rice based food, it makes her coat lank and smelly.
     
  14. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    Actually this is not totally accurate, if a supermarket shelf food (such as Arden Grange sold at Waitrose) says that the ingredients are rice, then that is what it contains, they do not change from month to month.

    For those products which do not have NAMED cereals, only "cereal derivatives" for example, THESE ingredients will fluctuate from batch to batch depending on market forces.

    So if you wish to be sure that your dog food contains RICE for example, you buy a product with a NAMED cereal.

    It must be remembered that many dog owners could not afford to feed commercial dog food which contained no cereals at all. ;)
     
  15. luvmydogs

    luvmydogs PetForums VIP

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    She hates it. :(
     
  16. Manoy Moneelil

    Manoy Moneelil PetForums VIP

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    Indeed if you can not afford to tax, insure, service and run a Rolls Royce you get a Ford, and if that a problem get a small one.

    Even buying at retail prices chicken as the mainstay of a Raw diet is cheaper Kg for Kg than many tinned/biscuit foods.
     
  17. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    Well unfortunately many people have been hit by the recession, they are finding it difficult to keep a roof over their heads, pay the mortgage, the bills, and feed themselves and their children.

    Thus they will be making cuts.

    Also not everyone can or wants to feed raw, for various reasons and that is their choice.
     
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