Crating while at work.. Here we go!

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by VictoriaDuh, Feb 8, 2018.


  1. VictoriaDuh

    VictoriaDuh PetForums Newbie

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    On Saturday, I picked up my new, beautiful baby boy. He is a Boston Terrier, 3 months old.. His name is Tux. My boyfriend and I have spent the last few days smothering him with attention, love and cuddles. He is quickly adapting to the house and us. Very smart (and cute!) little booger! We crate him at night which is right next to my side of the bed and he's been doing really well. We also crate him when we run to the store or to the gym for short periods, leaving the TV on and keeping his crate cozy. Today is our first actual day back to work. Luckily, I work about 5 minutes from home. 8AM-5PM is my schedule. Is me going home on my lunch at 11:45AM and second break at 2:30PM good enough for potty breaks and quick loves? New puppy parent, I think I have more separation anxiety than he does lol. Thank you!
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    9 hours crated apart from two short breaks is an awfully long time for a puppy; not only for holding his toilet but also for a social animal to be alone. Can you get a dog walker, neighbour or family member to spend some time with him during the day?
     
  3. VictoriaDuh

    VictoriaDuh PetForums Newbie

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    I have looked into it, yes. Have also considered bringing him to work occasionally. He has a little over an hour where I am with him during work, between lunch and break. This is pretty much only until he is potty trained enough for us to be comfortable with giving him more area (safe area, of course). This won't be a permanent thing.
     
  4. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums Member

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    I totally agree with @JoanneF that the situation isn't ideal at all for a pup that young. You do need someone elso popping in really. Also the 'quick loves' and 'smothering with attention' is ringing some alarm bells for me!

    Hard as it might seem, if your pup is going to have to be left alone, you need to play it cool when you pop in. By all means give attention but it needs to be the kind of attention that does not result in excitement ideally. So a calm potty break and maybe some calm training. Getting the pup to focus on you. Practise some sits and down stays. That kind of thing.

    Sorry if i have misunderstood but 'quick loves' sounds like a lot of cuddles and kisses and then disappearing back to work again. That really would not be fair.

    You need to give the kind of attention that leads to your pup being able to settle calmly and occupy itself.
     
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  5. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums Member

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    Ps also vitally - get your pup chew toy trained (ie able to chew kong toys for prolonged periods) That will help the hours pass by. You need to train a young pup to get the chew toy habit. It doesn't come automatically
     
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  6. VictoriaDuh

    VictoriaDuh PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry for the misunderstanding. Quick loves is just a quick kiss. I'm not overly affectionate when I come on lunch or breaks, and I do arrive and exit very calm and casually. He's gotten into the process. He stays calm when he's ready to leash up and go outside, then darts inside and right into the kitchen because he knows that he gets a treat for going potty. I don't like to get him rowdy before leaving, or even before bed obviously. We relax in our chair together before I leave. He gets drowsy and is ready to snooze and goes back in for another nap. Video has showed him watching TV, gnawing on safe toys and sleeping. He doesn't whine, cry or pay any attention to the crate.
     
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