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Crate training

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by odin, Apr 19, 2011.


  1. odin

    odin PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, im sure there have been many threads on crate training so i apologise in advance for doing another one, but im at a loss.
    I have a 14 week old northern inuit dog named Loki and i started crate training from day 1, slowly introducing him to the crate, putting his favourite things in, praising him when he went in willingly. Eventually i got to the point where he will sleep in it with the door closed.

    The problem is he will not settle when i leave the room, i started small a couple of minutes at a time and only let him out when he had calmed down for 10 seconds (which i read somewhere online). This was a difficult task in itself as finding a 10 second slot of quiet was near impossible. Now its been about 4 weeks and he still flips out the minute i start to exit the room; panting, digging, suckling his bed, whimpering, yelping snd howling until it strains his throat and this can go on in excess of 4 hours.

    I have tried allsorts, stuffed kong, ticking clock, hotwater bottle, favourite toys, things that smell of me, leaving the radio on, crate both covered and uncovered. I even left a video of someone snoring playing on my laptop in the hopes that it would reassure him, all to no avail. Its really beginning to stress both me and the neighbours out and i havent slept in weeks. So (finally) my question is do you know of any other techniques i could try, have you tried anything i havent stated and what where your results?

    Now if you got this far thanks for reading (sorry for the long post) and hope to hear from you.

    Nathan
    P.S i have also tried long walks and training play sessions before bedtime.
     
  2. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    I haven't had this problem so no advice sorry, but I'm sure someone will be along with some good ideas soon :)
     
  3. lucyandsandy

    lucyandsandy PetForums VIP

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    What are you doing while your waiting for him to be quiet? I haven't really had this problem, only for the first couple of days but I just said "ah ah" and she stopped. Obviously this is not going to be as easy for you!

    Are you fussing around him whilst waiting for him to be quiet? Maybe he is just not liking the crate, what is he like when you leave him in a room o his own?

    I can imagine how stressful it must be, hopefully someone on here can help you more than I can!
     
  4. odin

    odin PetForums Newbie

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    no i dont fuss him at all, just try to ignore him until he stops, do the washing up or something. He doesnt seem to mind the crate if im in the room he will take his self off into the crate when he is tired. If i just lock him in the room he jumps up and scratches the door and will mess on the carpet. he has also been known to chew through the wires on my tv and such, so i thought the crate would be best all round
     
    #4 odin, Apr 19, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2011
  5. Rottiefan

    Rottiefan PetForums VIP

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    You may need to build up the time you leave him in when you are out the room very slowly. Put him in the crate, but stay in the room near the door. Then open the door and walk up to it. Then take a few steps behind the door. And eventually leave for a couple of seconds. Does he just ignore the kong when you leave the room?

    Clicker training may be a good tool too. Click for when he's calm in his crate. Even when you step out you can click for silence and re-enter to treat. Or put up a mirror so you can click and treat for silence and preoccupation when you are out of the room.
     
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