Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Could my dogs bad behaviour be due to getting him neutured?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by kimlovesbarney, Dec 20, 2007.


  1. kimlovesbarney

    kimlovesbarney PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi ive had my daxie cross bischon for 16months now. When i first got him we went out everyday he went to the shops with me, the dog park and mixed well. He was the perfect dog expect that he was agressive with other dogs but only when he was on his lead and was perfect off! He also just to hump everyone, i was told that he was a dominant dog and needed to be neutured. So as soon as he got to six months he got neutured. It stopped the humping and the scent marking. But his aggression has got worst, he attacks other dogs when hes off the lead so now hes on the lead. He wont let anyone touch him expect from people he knows. He cowers away and wants to be picked up. He also goes for joggers and people on bikes. Its a good job hes a little dog cause otherwise i wouldnt be able to take him anywhere. Hes wasnt this bad b4 i got him neutured. Could this have changed him? Im really patient and try to catch him b4 he goes off on one but he goes to red zone so quickly! He loves me and wont leave myside.
    Any advice would be great. Ive had dogs b4 and never had these problems.
    thanks and have a good christmas Kim xx
     
  2. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    1,963
    Likes Received:
    448
    Unfortunately neutering a fearful male dog can make their behaviour worse. He was showing aggression on lead because he was frightened and felt trapped, off lead he was probably still worried but knew he could flight if the going got tough, so didn't need to fight (show aggression), also the fact that he humped a lots can be a fearful behaviour. Castrating a dog stops the production of testosterone which put simply is the hormone of competitiveness and bravery, so he is now more fearful than he was before, he has also found a great way of relieving himself of his fears, he uses aggression, and either the threat moves away or you move him away, either way he gets the desired results.
    As for curing him it will be a long slow process, of stopping the behaviour and confidence building, to be honest you really need some professional help, ask round for recommendations in your area.
     
  3. carol

    carol PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    6,358
    Likes Received:
    105
    if his a frighten dog and agressive would advise taking him to a training classes,
    did he go to any classes when younger,
    neutering it self dosnt to normally make a dog agressive there must have other behavour ploblems as well going on

    ask around and ask your vet for a good trainer.
     
  4. gloshuskys

    gloshuskys PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2007
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    As much as we all like to believe that are dogs love us etc, what he really means is that he owns you and you are his possession, so everyone stay away because you belong to him
     
  5. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    4,921
    Likes Received:
    230
    Castrating a dog is affording them a much healthier life. It reduces the chance of testicular tumors and lessened the likelihood of prostrate problems in later life.

    Of course the other benefits are to prevent undesirable sexual problems, and it will often (thought not always), prevent aggression from dog to dog.

    Fear aggression is always defensive in nature. It is often displayed by intense barking and generally lunging at any other dog, regardless of sex.

    This type of problem CANNOT be solved on a forum, only general advice can be given. I would ALSO strongly suggest that before you embark on any behavioural therapy, that your dog is medically checked. If you carry insurance, a vet can refer you to your nearest behaviorist, who will work with you to overcome his problem and of course, you will only be required to pay the excess on your insurance policy.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice