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Cophragia

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by SEVEN_PETS, Apr 21, 2011.


  1. SEVEN_PETS

    SEVEN_PETS PetForums VIP

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    Ollie has recently been eating poo, never his own but some dog poo (although not all, which makes me wonder if its the food that some eat that makes their poo tastier), cat poo, horse poo, cow poo, rabbit poo and sometimes fox poo (although he usually rolls in that).

    Is it something to do with his diet, ie lack of nutrients or is it habit? He's fed 120g of Burns dry food daily with a Bonio also given. He's perfect weight (12.5kg), got great body condition and coat condition. He always acts like hes starving though, scavenging objects like chips, chicken etc on his walks. I'm not too worried about him health-wise as he is wormed regularly, however I don't think it's good for his mental health. He's obviously doing it for a reason.

    Today I took him to the field and he found some fox poo (I think). I said Leave it to him strongly and he did leave it. So I decided to do some leave exercises with it so that he knows to leave poo in future. Bad decision because after about 5-6 good leaves, he walked over to it, I shouted leave, he completely ignored me and ate it. :cryin: It's so disgusting but it just shows that even if I practice the leave command with that item, he'll still take it given the chance.

    I read an article about dogs sniffing out droppings from endangered animals to help conservationists. They aren't allowed to eat it but they are rewarded for finding the droppings. I'm wondering if I should do something similar with Ollie, rewarding him for finding it but not allowing him to eat it. If I tell him off for finding poo and going near it, it'll just make him want it more, which is exactly what happened today. However I have no clue how to teach him to do this?
     
  2. Dogless

    Dogless PetForums VIP

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    There was a thread on this recently here; it is something that Kilo does too: http://www.petforums.co.uk/dog-health-nutrition/157334-poo-eating.html

    Kilo's is (touch wood) markedly better following the food variation, and he will now leave when asked about 85% of the time if it is a very tasty one although it cost me a lot of training treats!! :eek:

    For the last few days Kilo has eaten none or just one tasty morsel which is a huge improvement from his 'all you can eat banquet' approach he took previously!!
     
  3. lexie2010

    lexie2010 PetForums Senior

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    lexie does it too, not dog poo, just every other poo she can find-she started eating cow poo as a pup in the field behind our house and then progressed to bird poo from around bird feeder and horse poo on beach and fox poo anywhere she can find it. its just a dog thing! she has been on different diets throughout all of these manky mouthfuls and is certainly not lacking. I do try to stop her whenever I see her do it and make sure that she is wormed and flea'd regularly as they can get fleas from bird crap too.
    she doesnt eat her own thank god as then there would be trouble as it is the only thing that will stop her digging-we have all these holes in our garden filled with her poo!!!! very classy :eek:
     
  4. tripod

    tripod PetForums VIP

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    Coprophagia is something that I seem to be dealing with a lot in the last month with clients; maybe its teh good weather everybody being out and about I suppose.

    Here is a handout on it: http://petcentral.yolasite.com/resources/Coprophagia.doc
    More suited if its his own poo.

    And here is a little about teaching your dog to become a poo detective (scroll right down!): Canine Capers – dogs who love to steal | Pet Central's Pawsitive Dawgs Blog!

    Doing 5 or 6 practice runs is not sufficient proofing for something so yummy like foxpoo :D :rolleyes:
     
  5. grandad

    grandad PetForums VIP

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    Is 12.5 KG the right body weight for his breed? I feed my guy 3% of his body weight. he is 21.5Kg so he gets just over 600g per day over 2 meals.
    I also feed my guy Burns chicken and rice along with Nature Diet and Nature Menu in the morning with Burns.
    So he gets both mixed together, he also gets raw bones as well, ensuring he has enough nutrients. It may be worth checking with a K9 nutritionist first.
     
  6. SEVEN_PETS

    SEVEN_PETS PetForums VIP

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    Cocker spaniels are supposed to be between 12-14kg, although when Ollie was 14 kg, he was overweight.

    It states on the Burns website that I should be feeding 120g for a 12kg dog, so I'm going by the burns guideline.
     
  7. London Dogwalker

    London Dogwalker PetForums Senior

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    Well it's fun isn't it? :D Looking at it from his POV, especially rabbit and deer poo, yum yum grassy tasting poo that smells so sweet. (to him) :cryin: :(

    You just gotta work on it loads and loads in different situations, with different tempting things for him to 'leave'. Make sure what you have is LOADS better for him then that as well, something fairly natural like baked liver won't make him beef up if you're worried about him putting on weight. :)

    The important thing as well is ignoring him if he does it, if you shout at him, or change your body language hell pick up on it, I just laugh if my dog does it, it won't kill her. *shrug* She can now walk through take away boxes and chips and chicken bones and not touch them, but rabbit poo is still far too tempting. No big deal is it? Dogs are dogs! :cool:

    I actually prefer to teach a leave thesedays using the dogs own impulse control, so they learn to leave and look to you for feedback - without using the word at first in a variety of different situations. Saying 'LEAVE' in a strong voice isn't what you want, you don't need to change your tone of voice if the dog understands what you're asking of them and you've made it better and more rewardin for them to comply than to ignore the command.
     
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