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Cocker 7 months: Is this normal behaviour?

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Tara 76, Nov 30, 2013.


  1. Tara 76

    Tara 76 PetForums Junior

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    Hi,

    Dotty is a very lovable girl; always wanting kisses and cuddles, but she has turned very barky and vocal at EVERYTHING. She has also started really nipping again and jumps up all the time. She is a nightmare when anyone visits and nearly knocks them over with enthusiasm. She jumps all the time when she wants something barking etc.
    Any tips? How can I tell if she is being aggressive or it is just her age? She hasn't been spayed.
     
  2. Sillypeach

    Sillypeach PetForums Junior

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    Cockers are well known as barkers. We just lost our cocker spaniel in febuary and he barked all the time, everyday of his life.

    The jumping up and nipping is sort of a spaniel thing as well. They are naughty puppies. You've probably been told to ignore her, or redirect her to a toy or chew wehn she bites. Keep it up, she will grow out of it eventually. wish I could say the same thing about the barking.
     
  3. Lopside

    Lopside PetForums VIP

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    It sounds more attention seeking than aggressive. Have you tried asking visitors to ignore her when they first come in, keeping her on a lead until she calms down etc?
     
  4. Tara 76

    Tara 76 PetForums Junior

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    Thanks again all :)

    It is impossible for people to ignore her :) She wont allow it! I do put her in her crate for a few minutes but that doesn't work either!
     
  5. donna160

    donna160 PetForums Senior

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    i dont have a Cocker, but my poppy age 11 months is exactly the same!

    on some advice given her i bought a tall dog gate so i can put her safely out of the way,i never intended to have one but it is a godsend!
    she can still see us and barks like merry h*ll but if she calms down i let her out and have the visitor give her a treat as of yet it's not working she just goes beserk again and i have to put her back behind the gate (not as easy as it sounds as she's very wilfull and strong :rolleyes:...but hopefully it will sink in at some point.

    Could be worth a try...good luck with whatever you try :)
     
  6. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    I have a barker she is a cocker spaniel! Many breeds are known to barkers so I just think its a dog think really ^^'

    On youtube their is a very good trainer who goes by the name of Kikopup and has her own channel she has some videos that help prevent barking I would highly recomend a look as their an alternative to the more mainstream dominance/pack leader type training which will ruin your relationship with your dog.

    I find standing to the side when the dog approaches stops a dog from jumping up at me and keeping my hands in my pockets until I am invited deters bouncey dog and also stops the dog being able to nip. I also don't make eye contact or acknowledge a dog until I am invited to sit down
     
  7. bay20

    bay20 PetForums Senior

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    she might be a bit young but could be going into the adolescents where apparently alot,not all, dogs "forget" everything youve taught them and test their boundaries again. i had to start from scratch and re train, and though it might be hard and she doesnt like to be ignored it may be the best way. she could be trying to show you shes in charge by demanding the guests attention and your attentions, making her the most important "person" in the room. (this is what i was told about mine when he was jumping up). we cured it by asking people to ignore him and say their hellos to the humans in the house first, and turn or step to the side if he was jumping up, never backwards and the second his four paws touched the floor he gets his hellos and cuddles from everyone. i can see he still desperately wants to jump up but knows he wont get any cuddles if he does. its tough but it did work!
     
  8. sullivan

    sullivan PetForums VIP

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    After owning a cocker for 13 yrs sounds like normal cocker behaviour to me they can be very vocal . mine was untill he got a bit older. And he use to do it for attention almost like he was talking to us. They can be very play bitey also. Alot changes with age and of course training
     
  9. Fluffster

    Fluffster Crazy for cockers

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    Daisy isn't a massive barker, but she does bark if she hears a dog barking outside or someone approaching the house.

    We didn't want to stop her barking altogether as I quite like that she alerts us when someone is at near the door, but obviously a couple of barks is sufficient for that. We are training her to stop after a couple of barks, we say "Thank you Daisy" and when she is silent, she gets praised. It's working quite well. Weirdly she never barks outside the house regardless of the situation, even if another dog is barking in her face!
     
  10. Tara 76

    Tara 76 PetForums Junior

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    Ah she seems to have changed again over-night. Maybe she saw me posting on here :thumbup1: She is very vocal; it is like she is trying hard to talk as sometimes it is a 'geruff' rather than a bark. Thank you for all your replies. Very helpful as usual.
     
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