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Clipping dogs fur... help

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by StephLiechti, Aug 16, 2019 at 10:50 AM.


  1. StephLiechti

    StephLiechti PetForums Newbie

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    Hi All!

    My springer spaniel is going for a hair cut tomorrow, she is currently a scruffy mess.. she has been before but didn’t require clipping, however now her fur has gone out of control but the groomer we use are reluctant to clip her as they think it will “ruin her fur”. We had a springer before who always had his fur clipped no problems. Surely a single coated breed should have no problems being clipped? Any advice would be greatly appreciated! X
     
  2. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Do they hand strip? Not sure if springers are hand stripped or not, but is that what they would advise?
     
  3. StephLiechti

    StephLiechti PetForums Newbie

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    They didn’t mention that but I’m not sure that would work or be enough! :(
     
  4. Happy Paws

    Happy Paws PetForums VIP

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    We have a Springer over the road who they have clipped twice year, looks lovely after.
     
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  5. MontyMaude

    MontyMaude PetForums VIP

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    Do you do any grooming at home? I think sometimes spaniels coats can go weird and fluffy after they have been clipped, my inlaws spaniel's fur has always had a strange fluffiness to it after he was clipped, he looks like a yeti in the winter when it grows back, I love the look of a tatty spaniel and keep my two Cavalier crosses fairly natural and hairy, and just give them a little tidy up trim as needed and shave their fluffy feet, I find a quick once over every week keeps them knot free apart from if they go into a hedge and come out covered in sticky burrs.
     
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  6. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Can anybody explain to me how cutting hair (which is ‘dead’ as soon as it leaves the hair follicle) can have an effect on how it grows back?

    I always had my Cockers ‘shaved’ at the beginning of the summer and their coats, which were an amazing glossy mahogany colour, always grew back exactly the same.

    The only thing I’ve experienced that permanently changed a coat was neutering; One of my girls was spayed aged 10, due to Pyometra, and her coat after that was like a fluffy teddy bear.
     
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  7. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Reena is a very soft, silky 'wire-haired' dachshund. The breed need to be stripped for showing as clipping can make it softer, don't know why, but Reena's coat is now curly ! If I didn't know her full history I would think she had some poodle in her ancestry. It seems to even softer since she was spayed at 5 .yo.
    My 2 get clipped 2x a year, Bobby's coat is much coarser and more 'wire', I wonder if it will change when he's neutered?
     
  8. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    See I do see neutering effects the coat in some breeds, and yep in springers I describe it more as woolly coated after neutering.

    Some breeds that that really need hand stripping, thinking more along wire haired breeds but that isn't inclusive, clipping seems to 'damage' for want of a better word how the coat lays per se. But this is me only looking visually at my own experience of my own JRT when she was poorly and couldn't be hand stripped at all; time restraint was kinder to let her be clipped as it would be quicker. There might be some science on how stripping stimulates coat growth, and way hair grows, Vs clipping I don't know for sure. Someone more experience will be able to explain
     
  9. StephLiechti

    StephLiechti PetForums Newbie

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    She is groomed at home but we’ve only had her 8 months and has had a few groomer visits but didn’t require any major hair removal but it’s got worse. She has very soft fur but I can’t understand why they think it would ruin her coat.
     
  10. StephLiechti

    StephLiechti PetForums Newbie

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    She’s the one on the right..
     

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  11. Peggypegs

    Peggypegs PetForums Member

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    @Linda Weasel from what I’ve read most of the “damage” for clipping a double coat is it disrupts the hair growing cycle as undercoat grows faster then top coat. Most undercoat will come back quickly and then be blown seasonally but top coat isn’t blown seasonally so grows a lot slower; so when it’s clipped frequently the undercoat grows over the top of the top coat so to speak and the weather proof tips of the top coat are lost leaving a very soft coat not a silky/wirey coat.

    If the top coat is short it’s not as bad as the hair doesn’t have to grow that long but longer coats are more noticeable. Most spaniel people I follow online seem to prefer raking the undercoat out so it doesn’t get longer then the top coat.

    Neutered coats have more profuse undercoat which makes the effect of clipping more pronounced.
     
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