Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Clingy mini dachshund puppy

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by mooseeats, Oct 11, 2020.


  1. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    Hi guys, I was hoping people might be able to offer some insights. We have a gorgeous 13 week old mini doxie, she's been with us for nearly 3 weeks. In that time, toilet training is going well (mainly going outside in our garden or on pads, with a few little accidents), she has a good food routine and she sleeps in her crate throughout the night with no crying. Myself and my partner work from home so we are around constantly but have started to leave her for 1-2 hours alone in her pen with her toys, water and bed and she seems to occupy herself with them just fine.
    The main issue is that when we are in the room, even after we've met her needs (she's had a wee/poo, she's eaten, she's had at least 30 mins of play time), she still wants our attention. This means as we watch TV right next to her, she's barking, pacing and growling. She has her toys/water/bed by her but ignores them entirely. If we leave the room, within about 10 mins she settles and usually starts playing with her toys or goes to sleep. If we stay in the room and try to do our normal routine in the evenings which is to sit and watch tv for 2 hours before bed, she can bark/growl and pace for a good hour.
    We're really worried she is under exercised but from everything we've read, we're doing enough. I wonder if the solution is that we don't sit in that room around her bedtime (8pm onwards) so she can settle and go to sleep? Or would that create an unhelpful habit - as her bed is in our family living room and we do spend a few hrs every evening watching tv there.
     
  2. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2011
    Messages:
    9,876
    Likes Received:
    11,896
    Hi. Welcome to the forum.

    So she doesn't get your attention while you're working (because of course, you can't give her attention then).
    She doesn't get your attention for the 1-2hrs you leave her.
    She's alone overnight.

    And you're wondering why she's kicking off when you're trying to watch TV?

    I think you're trying to fit the cube block into the round hole. I'm also surprised she's not bouncing off the walls.

    House Training.
    Puppy pads are only teaching her to toilet indoors. So if you want her to be clean in the house, you're going to have to go back to basics and take her out every hour, plus after eating, sleeping, trainjng and playing.

    When she goes to the toilet in the garden, go OTT with praise. It's the best thing, cleverest thing you've ever seen. She gets a super tasty treat suh as cheese or sausage or chicken.

    Clean up any accidents without complaint. Keep your facial expressions neutral, and if you say anything at all, just go, "oops! A little accident!"

    Has she had her 2nd vacs yet? If so, are you taking her for short, on leash walks?

    Spend more time playing with her and incorporate training in the play. When she has to entertain herself, give her a stuffed Kong.
     
    LittleMow, Torin. and O2.0 like this.
  3. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2016
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    706
    They are only leaving her for 1-2 hours in the day not all day whilst they work.
    I would suggest spending some time in the room with her bed so she gets used to you being around but not giving her attention. Pop in and walk straight back out, build up the time. My 10 week old pup used to cry when I was in the room and he was in his crate but he's used to me flitting in and out now, sometimes I work in that room so he knows when he's in his crate no matter what's happening around him that it's quiet time. It's all baby steps though and they do need a lot of attention when they are such a young age.
     
  4. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12

    Thanks so much for your reply.


    She had her 2nd vacs 3 days ago, and have been told we can walk her outside in a week. We're hoping that will help her and us as we appreciate our garden isn't huge and she's confident and curious and probably wants more to do!

    When it comes to accidents, there's been 5 in the whole 3 weeks she's been with us so she is doing really well there, and we are very careful to show encouragement when she goes in the garden and to remain neutral when she's had an accident. We're aware it's our fault, not hers, and aren't concerned about how she's doing there.

    She cried the first 2 nights of sleeping alone but since then, she sleeps through the night and never cries in the night. She is usually sleeping in her bed in our living room for a good hour before we ever leave her for the night so we're not abruptly leaving her or anything. The first two nights, she would sleep and then wake up in the night and cry. She never cries in the night if she wakes up now (we would hear her!) and seems to be comfortable enough to go back to sleep.

    I didn't think we were doing anything wrong as she has interactions every 1-2 hrs throughout every single day, whether it's 15 mins or play or cuddles. I'm not sure how much more we should be doing then this at her age? And in the evenings when she wants our attention, it's usually after she's had a run around the garden, poo'ed/pee'ed, had dinner, and had lots of play with chew toys and cuddles with us (1-2 hrs of interaction). So should we religiously be playing with her every hour? And spending more hours with her in the evening then we do? As I said, she never cries in the day if she's left alone and I honestly didn't think we were leaving her alone too long - she only cries when she's in the same room as us and we try to get her to play alone in the pen. We will definitely think more about our approach, she's still so young and we're in a position to give her much more attention then we do (both self employed with staff so very flexible schedules) but also didn't want to create an unhealthy routine of us being around too much. For example, for several days I worked right next to her with my laptop even though I have a separate home office but I was told by others that this was unhealthy, so I've tried to spend 1-2 hours in my office and get her used to me not being there all the time. I guess there's been a lot of conflicting advice too.
     
  5. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    Thanks for the reassurance and tip.
    The thing is, she is completely fine as we flit in and out and even fine when we pop in after 1-2 hrs to take her for a wee break. She settles quickly when we leave and stay gone. It's only when we have to spend extended amounts of time in that room that she wants to be out of her pen and with us. We do allow this for 1-2 hrs but eventually, we need to eat or watch tv and not keep an eye on her and she's too young to roam the living room by herself (chews things!) We've been told if we're not activley engaging with her, she shouldn't just be roaming around until she's properly housetrained and should be in her pen. We've even tried getting in her pen and playing with her toys in there with her which does settle her but the minute we step out, she gets very upset. Just for reference, her pen is huge and is now positioned so it extends to the sofa so she can literally sit by our feet as we watch. Again I feel horrible as I get the sense she feels caged, but I don't think the solution is to let her roam free yet, or to play with her more (2 hrs of playing after her dinner is a lot in my opinion - and she doesn't seem to tire!)

    EDIT: If she's pacing and seems very upset, is it best to just offer her the attention even if we've met all her needs (she doesnt need a pee/poo, food) and even if we've just played with her for a long time? Or is it best to doubledown?
     
  6. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    7,256
    Likes Received:
    21,873
    Puppies need a lot of attention, it's how you will build the relationship. I have a new dog who's not a puppy, but still young, and yesterday doing house chores I was going room to room with a silly dog following me around, biting at my feet, stealing socks from the laundry, and generally making a pest of herself. It's totally normal and you just plan for the normal routine to be disrupted for a while.

    Evenings are always more difficult because most puppies have a witching hour that almost always coincides with when the humans want to settle down and wind down from the day.

    There are all sorts of ways you can deal with the witching hour, in this house we just let it ride. Right about when we take the pup out for her last wee of the night, she comes in and wants to bite everything. Last night she thought biting the older dog was a good idea, quickly learned it wasn't and settled pretty quickly after that. But usually we're looking at 15 to 30 minutes of having a tasmanian devil in the bed with us until she settles.

    Others time their training time around puppy witching hour, or have stuffed kongs ready or favorite toys ready.
     
    LittleMow, Torin. and LinznMilly like this.
  7. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    12,685
    Likes Received:
    14,809
    @mooseeats I'm wondering if it's the TV. Do you have one of those deals that are more like "entertainment centers"? Loud surround sound that picks up every level of noise and flings it around the room? (often heavy on the bass) Giant screen? What kind of shows are you watching? Calm and quiet things or shows full of action and noise flashing screen as the scenes change dramatically?
     
  8. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    14,475
    Likes Received:
    23,868
    I agree with the above. Both my adults would be most unhappy in a pen or crate if they can see us,I know this due to trying to cage-rest one of mine following back surgery. She would only settle if in direct contact with me.
    As @O2.0 says it's best to accept that and let her have contact with you in
    the evenings and keep watching her. Even now I'm getting up a few tmes every evening if the dogs want to go out, the times I've missed vital moments on TV are numerous ! It's just part of having a dog, specially a puppy.
    As she gets older she'll be happier to snuggle up to you on the sofa and keep you warm.:)
    My husband is currently sitting down with a dog either sde of him looking totally relaxed
     
    LinznMilly likes this.
  9. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    Thank you all for your lovely and kind replies.

    So, we watch Netflix mainly and a range of shows (Gilmore Girls to slightly more fast paced things). I don't think it's the TV noise as she likes background noise in the day when she's alone.

    I think it is that she 100% wants more attention and my partner and I have been told by people that too much attention can make them too needy so you need to lay down boundaries. She doesn't seem to respond to those boundaries and from what you guys are telling me, it's better we giver that additional attention rather than double down. We have very flexible jobs, our TV time isn't precious to us, she means way more to us and we're more then happy to spend more time with her. We're first time puppy owners and we've just been told we were overcoddling her. And the advice here suggests we're probably over neglecting her now! We will try and give her more attention instead of what we're doing now.

    Thank you.
     
    LittleMow, LinznMilly, O2.0 and 2 others like this.
  10. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Messages:
    12,685
    Likes Received:
    14,809
    What a lovely post. I mentioned the TV because I was remembering a thread in a different forum years ago, where someone was complaining about their elderly dog getting upset about the noise from the TV. They had a set up like what I described above, and watched a lot of cop shows and things with loud music and the dog was getting very upset and running around barking, especially at the higher bass noises. The dog was used to being with the family in the evening and the reactions started when they got their new "entertainment system" installed.

    I was shocked at how many people suggested shutting the elderly dog away in a room far away so he wouldn't be "disturbed" by the noise, rather than trying to accommodate the dog, who had lived all his life within the family, by disconnecting the surround sound or at least turning it down or something. I took a lot of heat, at the time, for my posts in that thread lol. It sounded so heartless.

    Oldie's deserve and need special care and consideration not being shut away.

    Anyway, back to you and yours, of course puppies do too, and it sounds like you've got the right idea already. :)
     
    LittleMow likes this.
  11. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Administrator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2013
    Messages:
    14,475
    Likes Received:
    23,868
    To be fair Dachshunds are a needy breed who have to be with their people !:)
    Both mine just about cope when we have to pop out but are much happier when we're home - I 'm a pensoner, my husband still works , 3 days a week at home.
    I'm sure mine are over-coddled and I make no apology for it. As far as I'm concerned they offer unconditional love and entertainment so I'm happy to give them the most comfortable and loving environment possible.:)
    I think you'll find relaxing your boundaries will pay dividends and help you enjoy your pup more.
    Try and relax.:)
     
    LittleMow, lorilu, O2.0 and 1 other person like this.
  12. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 23, 2018
    Messages:
    7,256
    Likes Received:
    21,873
    There are two main schools of thought when it comes to having dogs in our lives.
    One is that if you give them what they want they'll take advantage at best, have behavior issues at worst.
    The other school of thought is that if you meet the dog's needs the rest sorts itself out.

    Most of us on here are from the second school of thought, meet the dog's needs :)
    Now, that doesn't mean becoming a slave to your dog and being at their beck and call 24/7, there will be compromises, management, and contingencies. For example, if pup wants to play, fine, but it's TV time so we can do quiet play, not bomb around the house play. It's absolutely okay to set boundaries and say no, but all within a relationship of mutual respect and understanding.

    Your pup is still a baby really and is still learning the general routine of the household. It's perfectly okay to set boundaries for her while also letting her know that her needs will be met.
     
  13. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2017
    Messages:
    12,561
    Likes Received:
    29,999
    Loki is two and still plays in the evening he gets a toy out and drops it on my lap to interact I watch TV with half an eye. When I’ve really had enough the toy goes away. I’m also binging Gilmore Girls he has passed out now on my lap so I get some peace.
     
    LinznMilly likes this.
  14. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2016
    Messages:
    593
    Likes Received:
    706
    I see, our pup doesn't have a play pen he has a large crate in our conservatory for when I'm working in the day and a smaller crate in our bedroom where he sleeps. In the evening he's with us in the living room and we just watch him, yes we have had a couple of accidents but it's part and parcel of having a puppy. We eat at the table in the Conservatory, during this time Billy is either in his crate (he will whine for a few minutes sometimes if he doesn't want to be in there but most of the time settles while we eat) or if he's clearly on a mad one as puppies do then we leave him to run around and just keep an eye on him. If he jumps at us while we are eating he gets redirected to something else or ignored.
    Personally I think it's important they do get used to having time away from us because we can't be with them 24/7. You may only go out once a month for 3 hours for a meal but that would be a very long and distressing 3 hours if the dog has never been left alone. We know we can leave Dottie for 7-8 hours (very very rare) and she's not bothered at all.
     
    LinznMilly likes this.
  15. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    OK so I thought I'd give you an update.

    So, we've had our pupper for 3 weeks. We established a good sleeping (after 1 night of crying in her crate, she now falls asleep before we go to bed and sleeps through the night and holds in pees/poos until we let her out), eating (3 meals at set times) and toilet breaks routine (every 1-2 hrs she's taken to the garden). We were also doing lots of plays with her throughout the day as our jobs are very flexible/not consistent in working hours. We had a lot of feedback from other dog owners we know stating this would confuse her and we needed to enforce stricter play time hours, not just popping her in and out of her pen as it suited us. We also noticed the witching hour and were told it was because she was overtired.

    To correct that, we did our usual routine but stopped the random playtimes/cuddles and tried to stick to enforced times of contact for routine's sake, we also tried to ignore her witching hour so as not to engage and make her more tired. This is when her behaviour went 'off the walls' as it were and it confused us.

    After your responses here, we completely changed our approach yesterday and went back to our usual behaviour - same bedtime, same meal times, same toilet breaks BUT whenever we have time in the day, we come in and have a good 30 min play with her (this happens about 5-6 times a day at least). Again, I would say our dogowner friends thought we were over-doing it with her and going to tire her out/create separation anxiety issues because of this. Anyway, yesterday she's back to her old self. No longer frustrated about being in her pen - actually went in their willingly with her chew toy and curled up into her bed. We then closed the gate and ate dinner. She whined for about 5 mins but then was content playing by herself. She went to bed around 9pm without any pacing/upset. So I feel very stupid, because it was very simple what she needed - more of the attention we've always been giving her, that was suddenly taken away for the sake of creating boundaries/routine. I have told her we're sorry and mummy and daddy are still learning but it's been a relief beyond words to see her so relaxed again about being in her pen - she really did just miss the random cwtches! Getting a bit teary eyed writing this and feeling very silly!

    It's our first ever puppy and first ever dog of this breed (we've had family dogs, never this breed), so we're definitely still learning. I am just shocked at how quickly her behaviour adjusts around us - they clearly are so malleable at this age. She's already changed her behaviour so much in a day from changes we made.

    Thank you all for your feedback, it really did help.
     
  16. Tikathecat

    Tikathecat PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2020
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm glad to hear this outcome! My oldest dachshund is 9 now and she was my first dog (I have a 2 year old as well now). I read all the articles, watched the dog whisperer (lol) and tried to do everything perfectly, often ignoring my gut instinct because she was the most important thing I had ever been responsible for and I didn't want to **** it up. My advice now is, read all the things, but ultimately trust your gut. This includes when you're at the vet - even vets can and do get it wrong sometimes. You will come to know her better than anyone. I can tell you are both going to be great parents and she's lucky to have you! There will always be mistakes made, don't beat yourself up about it.
     
  17. mooseeats

    mooseeats PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2020
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    12
    Oh thank you for this lovely, kind reply. Yes, we really don't want to hurt her in anyway so we have been absorbing reading materials/videos but you are right about gut. We now play with her a lot and she's just gone three months so can go for walks, she never barks or paces in her pen anymore, she seems to get enough exercise and enough cuddles to satisfy her. If anything, we're the ones left unsatisfied haha. Still early days and still learning so much though.
     
    LinznMilly and lorilu like this.
  18. LinznMilly

    LinznMilly Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2011
    Messages:
    9,876
    Likes Received:
    11,896
    Glad she's so much more settled. :)

    Just ignore anything related to dominance theory or Cesar Milan. ;)
     
    lorilu likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice