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Choosing a behaviourist

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by goodvic2, Aug 1, 2009.


  1. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    Are you more likely to pick a behaviourist because:

    a) They have lots of letters after their name, therefore they have done a lot of studying.
    b) Somebody who has a proven track record of results, or maybe they have rehabilitated their own rescue dogs?

    PS You can only choose A or B!

    x
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Its silly if you have to pick just one.

    For me, a behaviourist should have some qualifications, have spent time studying natural behaviours and various training/rehabilitation methods, plus have some basic experience.

    I wouldnt trust someone who had merely just trained their own dogs. They may have found a method that worked, but it wont mean they have an understanding of why a dog does what it does, nor the ability to apply various methods to treat various issues.
     
  3. Nicky09

    Nicky09 PetForums VIP

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    Both personally. I would want someone with a proven track record probably even ask for references from the other owners but at the same time I wouldn't want someone who had just learned on their own dogs because whta works for one or two dogs won't work for all dogs.
     
  4. goodvic2

    goodvic2 PetForums VIP

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    It was quite badly put!

    Ok, would you use a behaviourist who had only ever studied and had never rehabilitated their own dogs?

    For me, if I was going to choose a behaviourist, I would of course want to see some qualifications. But I would also like to see that they have successfully rehabilitated their own dog, rescue of course!

    Would that be important for you?
     
  5. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Id prefer some experience with A dog, doesnt have to be their own. Thats basically saying that in order to be a behaviourist, you have to rescue a dog with problems and rehabilitate it.

    The vast majority of behavioural course require practical experience, often in rehoming centres. Its not all theory based. Plus most people going to do such qualifications have experience with dogs, so arent studying with no knowledge at all.

    I wouldnt say no to someone with qualifications but no experience, but it would also depend on the problem the dog was suffering from.
     
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