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choice help! Hungarian viszla, wiemaramer

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by vegasbaby100, Jul 22, 2009.


  1. vegasbaby100

    vegasbaby100 PetForums Junior

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    Hi

    Id like to thank all the people who replied to my last messgae and for all the personal messages. After much thinking and a lot of reading we are looking at Hungarian Viszla's and wiemararmer's.

    Does anyone here have any of these dogs or experience with them. We are looking for an active dog to be part of our very active lives and I personally would be looking for a dog that can come running with me a few times per day but which is also trainable and going to hopefully be good with recall.

    any help at all would be appriciated.

    All the best
     
  2. rona

    rona Guest

    If you are in the south east, please be very careful of the breedline you choose if you go for a wiemaramer, there are a few with temperament issues in this area.
    I have never come across a bad Vizla, though some have skin problems.
    If you do your research, you should be fine with either breed
     
  3. kaz_f

    kaz_f PetForums VIP

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    My Vizsla is fab, great natured and very loveable but he's hard work, exhuberant, quite vocal and full on about 98% of the time. He is very trustworthy with all my other pets and with kids though. Needs loads of walks and exercise though or he would become bored and he could go for miles and miles and miles and still not be tired.

    He's had a minor skin problem with the skin under his armpits but it's easily controlled with a special shampoo from the vets. Not sure how common this is with the breed though.

    I've never had a Weimaraner but would really love one.

    Good luck - and good choice of breeds!
    Karen
     
  4. Luvdogs

    Luvdogs PetForums VIP

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    Hi Kaz :D

    DT is the Weimy lady on here ;) I am sure she will feel you in on the Weims.
     
  5. Luvdogs

    Luvdogs PetForums VIP

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  6. 3 red dogs

    3 red dogs PetForums VIP

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    Hi Hun
    Well, as you may of gathered from my name, we have 3 Vizzies, and there wonderful.
    Not had so much to do with weims, but i can only say, and i'm sure DT would agree, there just a bigger version of Vizzie's

    Vizzies are just awesome as either a 'pet' or as a working dog, as long as your into high energy, shed loads of cuddles, and long long walks.

    If you need to know more, then please, don't hesitate to PM me, i can talk about this breed all day. LOL
     
  7. There are only two dogs for me! And you have thrown both of em in the eqasion! As REd has already said there is little difference between the two other then the size and maybe the vizzys are a little thinner on the ground!

    Speaking from experience they are not the easiest of dogs! but with firm kind handling they are 'king' im my eyes!

    About 10-12 years ago the pf's and byb jumped on the band wagon and to some extent the breed did suffer! These have subsided somewhat of late and there are fabulous knowledgeable breeders that are breeding purely for their love of the breed!

    They are NOT the easiet of breeds! but imo one of the best!
    If you need any help, advice or need to know anything pm me!

    Characteristics of the Weimaraner
    The Weimaraner is one of the sub-group known as the Hunt Point & Retrieve breeds, within the Gundog group. He is an all purpose gundog but his character and temperament is quite dissimilar to that of other gundogs.
    He was originally bred to be the tool for the foresters who worked him. He had to be capable of tracking and holding at bay such game as boar and deer. He had to have the ability to find, flush and retrieve fur & feathered game for the pot. He had to catch and kill predators that deprived his master of sport and also defend him and his property. He was intended to be a powerful hunting dog with a strong protective instinct.

    What he is not
    He is not the wisest choice for a completely novice dog owner. Of course there are the exceptions . People do buy him as a first dog and succeed admirably in his care and training. These are the people who have energy to match the Weimaraner’s own, who are possessed of patience, perseverance, and a certain amount of gritty determination. He must know from an early age exactly what position he holds in the family pecking order and if you are wise that will be at the bottom of the heap.
    He does not take kindly to being left alone all day and every day and can show his disapproval by being noisy (very), destructive, or both. He needs free running exercise as well as disciplined walking and also to have his mind occupied. With correct training the Weimaraner will make a good family dog but he will never make an easy pet.


    What makes him tick?
    He is full of charm, a loving beast with a quick intelligence and a stubborn streak a mile wide. He will given the chance take over the household and all its adjuncts. He can become too possessive , too demanding , too intolerant of strangers. Under exercised, unoccupied and bored he can wreak havoc. Jaws such as his can make light work of the happy home. He is also quite capable of rearranging your landscape and can introduce a cavern or tasteful tunnel with apparently very little effort.
    Everything about this beautiful animal has an element of challenge. He is such a ‘get up and go' creature possessed of a quick intelligence, an abundance of energy, a drive to hunt, a streak of possessiveness and an exaggerated devotion, which has to be tempered to the demands of a modern world. He is not everyone's dog and should not be looked upon as a commercial proposition although, alas, he sometimes is. If you take him on you must remember his heritage and be sure you can apply the challenge and its immense rewards.


    (Taken from an article by Margaret Holmes)
     
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