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Choc Lab With Hip Dysplacia

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by cliffw0970, Mar 28, 2011.


  1. cliffw0970

    cliffw0970 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi All

    This is my first post and I am asking for advice so please excuse me

    Sadie is 5 years and 9 months and lets just say she is my world.
    After a trip to the vet for a limp on her hind right leg it turns out she has in the vets words "severe" hip dysplacia and arthritis in both legs bot more so in the left strangely when the reason i took her in was the right leg

    Sadie loves going to the field and chasing her infamous Frisbee but i am told this must stop and I fully understand why, just short 20 minute walks past the field she loves so much unfortunately

    Sadie has pain killers and anti inflammatory tablets to try for 1 month but I just cant help feel this will be to no avail. water therapy etc has been mentioned but this is just not possible due to work commitments (I would if I could believe me)

    I am convinced that in 1 month I am going to have to make the biggest decision and something I have been thinking about constantly for 2 weeks, a double hip replacement. my insurance nearly covers 1 hip and I don't mind stumping up for the other, I really couldn't see here in any pain for what will hopefully be the second half of her life, but at the same time it scares me to death.

    Sadie's mum and dad were both hip scored and checked out OK, I can only presume this condition became apparent in one of them in later life.

    I am just looking for advice or anything you can really, I just wish I could ask her what she wants to do

    Many thanks for any responses,

    Cliff & Sadie
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Have you been referred to a specialist at all?
     
  3. cliffw0970

    cliffw0970 PetForums Newbie

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    The X-rays went to a specialist, the vet diagnosed her from the initial look at them and then sent them off, the "severe" diagnosis came from the specialist.

    Thanks
     
  4. Dally Banjo

    Dally Banjo PetForums VIP

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    So sorry to hear about Sadie :( Unfortunately just beacuse her parents were/are ok it does'nt mean she would be just that she had a good chance of not developing it, both our dogs parents are fine as are all his brothers & sisters, as far as we know but he has HD in his left hip & has bad arthritus in his other joints & back becasue he was compensating for his bad hip.

    He is on prevecox & tramadol as well as a suppliment called Synoquin which is very good. Hydro really really helps if you can get to one or get someone to take her for you :) x
     
  5. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Hi Cliff _ I know exactly what you're going through, my beautiful boy Flynn is about to have his second hip replacement on April 11th - he is just under 3 years old. I have a sticky on here - Diary of a hip replacement - which I wrote for other people to see, in the hope that it would put anyone's mind at rest who may be thinking about this surgery. Please have a read and you'll see it's not all doom and gloom, in fact it was very easy for Flynn and I to cope with once we got the hang of it. I decided to have it done while he was young as he couldn't walk for longer than 20 mins and eventually only managed around 15 mins at a time. I didn't want arthritis to set in, so had it done as soon as I found out he had severe HD. He was diagnosed in April last year and had his first op in August. I had e mailed and ortho surgeon and asked for advice, was answered and told that as his walking was so limited a hip replacement was an option. I ummed and arred, didn't know what to do then I saw a tv programme (Bionic Vet) and realised that that was who i'd e mailed. Made my mind up and haven't looked back. ;)

    He's still not right and his exercise is very limited because he hasn't had the other hip done yet but in a couple of weeks he'll be on the road to full recovery at last.
    The reason i've waited so long is because I have had to wait for my insurance to be renewed, to be covered for the next op. I have "lifetime" cover which means we start off each year with £7,000 in the coffers, so he can have it done again. If i'd had "per condition" he would have only been insured for one.

    Noel said there is no upper age limit to hip replacement surgery, so your girl is at a good age and you shouldn't worry.
    If you have any questions pm me and i'll get back to you, or will give you my number for a chat.

    It's really not the end of the world and to me - and Flynn - it's more like the beginning of a new life. :)
     
  6. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    I am sorry to hear about your girl - do you have a dog physio locally? some clinics will keep the dogs and treat them at regular intervals during the day.

    It doesn't work like that - if a dog has good hips when scored, it will suffer no more than general wear and tear just as humans do on their joints - good hips will not deteriorate majorly unless something dramatic happens (and then it wouldn't be genetic).

    The risks of HD are considerably lower if both parents are hipscored with reasonable scores - but they are not non-existent - I've got a girl here with very poor hips with no history in her background - sometimes, it just happens if there is a genetic predisposition there.

    What I would say (and I am not a vet) - I am surprised she has got to the age she has without it being detected if it hs severe enough to require hip replacements.

    We have used alternative therapies on my girls knee with excellent results - it completely dislocated - she has had water treadmill (which she adores) - ultrasound, acupuncture and cartophen injections - she has green lipped mussel, Glucosamine, Chondroitin and MSM and salmon oil - I also use the Dorwest Herbs Garlic and Fenugreek and Mixed vegetable tablets.

    I also keep Bromelain and Devils Claw in case she is in pain - as they are outstanding anti-inflammatories (but I've not used them in nearly a year)

    She has not had a painkiller from the vets in over a year - she hooleys around with my other 6 dogs as if there is nothing wrong with her - gets her hard street walking every single day - and can clear heights that would make me nervous - all with poor hips and a very ropey knee - she is also 5 years old.

    I have little doubt that, at some point, she will probably succumb to arhritis before her kennel mates - but for the moment, she is living a very full and extremely active life with no surgical intervention and no pain - and she lives for going to her physio sessions - she adores them and they adore her.

    ---------------------------------

    Just some things to think about as alternatives to surgery - particularly if it is going to be cost prohibitive - feel free to give me a shout if you want any more info - hope you manage to get it sorted - IMHO - if I felt there was an alternative to surgery that would give her a good quality of life without pain - I would chose that - but everyone is different.
     
  7. cliffw0970

    cliffw0970 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you very much Dally Banjo for replying, I thought one of the parents had to have it, learn something everyday and it clears that one up. its good to hear from someone in a similar situation as my own, which is why I signed up and posted, thank you.

    Malmum, your post was one of the first things I read when in registered, there's so much about the condition/symptoms and treatments on the internet but was really good to get a first hand and real life account

    It really was the end of the world 2 weeks ago when I was told the news, as a 28 year old guy I try not to sit around crying :( but she got me on this one. just made me even more aware of the love I have for this pup. im sure you have been through the same on numerous occasions.

    I researched the bionic vet a couple of minutes ago and think I may have found who you speak of. That is one of my other main concerns, finding someone competent enough to do this. The Vet has pretty much said that this is the likely outcome and so its what i am preparing myself for in a month when we go back.

    As said before, its good to speak with others in the same boat, I felt like we were in this alone

    All this after I took her to the vet for what I thought was a muscle or ligament, she never fails to shock me :)
     
  8. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    I can't add any advice, having had it all myself to deal with on Saturday as my 9 month old springer was diagnosed too.

    All I can tell you is to get the supplements that have been recommended (seroquin has better absorption than plain glucosamine and chondroitin, I understand, not sure if synoquin is the same?), green lipped mussel, tumeric.

    The people on here are knowledgeable and kind and will tell you whatever you need to know. My next thread is going to be something about keeping a lively dog entertained but not too mobile-we've to keep ours on the lead for the next 3-4 months, I guess so we can wait for the next set of x-rays when he's skeletally mature.

    Bloody heartbreaking, I bawled at the vets. I can tell you I went through 2 lots of cruciate replacements with another dog and he came back to full fitness.

    A girl I know with a lab had the partial excision operation for dysplasia and her dog appears to have fully recovered. It's not the best option, IMO, because arthritis may be worse with that op than the full hip replacement.

    Talk to anyone who offers!
     
  9. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    As per my original post - the parents hips WOULD NOT have developed into Dysplasia later in life if their hips were scored and the results good - it simply doesn't work like that - and you will find that dogs scored for overseas purposes after being scored in the UK are found to have no deterioration in later years.

    There will also be the risk of genetic prediposition to HD - the risks are significantly reduced but not completely removed.

    Severe HD nearly always manifests itself by 12 months of age - which is why I am surprised your girl could be so bad as to need surgery at her age with something that has just appeared.

    There is also instances of hip replacements failing (several times in some instances) - take a look at the Labrador health website for people's experiences of replacement surgery (and alternatives)

    http://www.lab-health.co.uk/charlie.html

    http://www.lab-health.co.uk/yours.html
     
    #9 swarthy, Mar 28, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011
  10. Zaros

    Zaros Pet Forums, P/resident Evil

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    I am sorry to learn of Sadie's problems and can sympathise with everything you must be going through and are troubled with regarding the use of adequate pain killers, therapy and/or corrective surgery.
    We experienced a similar problem with Oscar. He's a Sarplaninac (Rare giant breed) and at the time he was only 9 months old. For us the only guaranteed cure was surgery.
    Failing that his life expectancy from the time of diagnosis was just a matter of months before his condition finally began to take its toll and destroyed the quality of his life completely.
    The surgeon and his team who carried out the corrective procedure were truly amazing and despite a week of nights being deprived of sleep immediately after his operation it was a very small sacrifice indeed to see his return to complete health.



    Just 8 weeks later this was the result;


    VIDEOS/PHOTOS REMOVED DUE TO MALICIOUS INTENT

    We didn't have insurance for Oscar. Policies here don't really cover you for such occurrences but as you have insurance I wouldn't hesitate to put the policy to good use and have Sadie a new lease of life. :001_smile:

    All the very best to you and Sadie

    Zaros
     
    #10 Zaros, Mar 28, 2011
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2018
  11. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    Swarthy, I daren't look. Stupid, I know, but the vet said no surgery for Zak as it's mild. I really hope we don't need to go there. :(

    Zaros, is that a full hip replacement?

    How are you guys getting the x-rays? Do you just ask? :confused: I guess you paid therefore you own them.
     
  12. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Totally agree with Zaros - Flynn's new hip. (Bio Medtrix - BFX implant)

    [​IMG]

    And six weeks later. :)

    [​IMG]
     
    #12 Malmum, Mar 28, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2011
  13. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    They are yours by right really because like you say you've paid for them and if you wanted to go to another vet you wouldn't want to put your dog through another GA. My vet gave me Flynns to take to Noel, so Noel now has them but before that I asked if I could take my camera and photograph them for my own records - took photo's of Noels ones too, so as I could put them in my diary. ;)
     
  14. Zaros

    Zaros Pet Forums, P/resident Evil

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    We paid for the X-rays to be taken and therefore we own them.
    This is a complete replacement. The captive cup is designed from a fine mesh which, over time, the tissue grows into and over thus bonding it permanently with the skeletal frame.
    Unfortunately, as you can probably already see from the enclosed X-ray, Oscar requires left hip correction. But as of this present moment in time it is not causing him any trouble, we have no intention of repeating the surgery until it is evident that he does have a problem with it.

    We exmaine the leg once every week to check that he is not being caused any discomfort by deterioration of the joint or progression of other conditions often associated with HD and everything to date appears satisfactory.
    He doesn't resist or show any reluctance at our attempts to manipulate the offending leg. In fact, if I didn't know better, then I'd say from his experience he understands and accepts what we're doing for him.

    Also enclosed is a short video of Oscar with the love of his life, Zara, 5 months after his surgery. The lighter shade across his rear is the new coat growing back.

    YouTube - Sarplaninacs. Lets play chase.
     
  15. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    There are lots of different experiences on Lab Health - some of them are extremely sad - others are much more positive (and one or two need updating :rolleyes::)

    I hope he won't need surgery as well - as in my other post, and I know Sleeping Lion's post - there are a whole raft of alternative therapies which can be used from phsyio to over the counter supplements.
     
  16. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Love the video Zaros - two beautiful dogs there. :)
     
  17. cliffw0970

    cliffw0970 PetForums Newbie

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    Severe HD nearly always manifests itself by 12 months of age - which is why I am surprised your girl could be so bad as to need surgery at her age with something that has just appeared.[/QUOTE]


    Sadie seemed normal until the beggining of the year and so there was no reason to check before, she has always had a little flick in her right leg as she ran at full speed but didnt seem to be in any pain during or after, I put this down to one of her many quirks. I actually asked the vet a couple of years ago about this, he manipulated the both legs there was no pain and muscle was even both sides, looking back now there was obviosly an issue. infact she doesnt seem in pain as she walks now, its more post walk, I hate to see her struggle to her feet after any period of laying down.


    There is also instances of hip replacements failing (several times in some instances) - take a look at the Labrador health website for people's experiences of replacement surgery (and alternatives)

    Labrador Health brings you the story of Charlie, the Bionic Pup

    Labrador Health: Your stories[/QUOTE]

    Thats not great to see, poor thing !!!

    To everyone else who has replied, thanks for taking an interest and its educating to hear your situations and for this I thank you

    Cliff
     
  18. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    There is always a risk with any surgery, in the case of THR it's currently 10%. My vet said a THR is a very common op these days, thousands being done every year in the UK alone.
    If it fails the socket is taken out and a Femoral Head Ostectomy is done instead. This is sometimes done if the owner doesn't have insurance. I know of a Rottie who had this surgery and is doing well. Cost was £700, a lot cheaper than a THR. VetInfo - Veterinary Medical Information for Dogs and Cats - F- Femoral Head Ostectomy

    With any surgery there are risks, in humans too - that's why it's important to weigh up all the pro's and con's and make the decision yourself. It's the one time a surgeon won't try to sway your opinion, as you're the one who needs to be comfortable with it. :)
     
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