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Change in routine

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Always_worried, Apr 19, 2020.


  1. Always_worried

    Always_worried PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, im new here and am looking for some advice.
    My husband and I rescued a border collie in October (he has just turned 1 this month). He is the most amazing and loving dog i have ever met, and he settled in really well. We had the normal puppy teething issues with a few accidents but nothing major.
    He has always been happy enough when left alone for a few hours as long as he has toys, and kongs hidden around the room.
    He goes to day care a few times a week when we are at work and we have help from family on the other days he is due to be on his own, so he is never alone more than a few hours at a time. I am now on maternity leave and am going to be home all the time. I have noticed some changes to his behaviour when he is left overnight. He sleeps in the kitchen in his bed, and we leave a few toys in there with him but nothing that should over stimulate him. He has always been a bit of a chewer but we had got him to stop, but he has started chewing the chairs and scratching at the wall, and has started jumping up at the benches. chewing/ eating things things on there. (All items removed now so this doesnt happen again) i dont want him to get so used to me being home all the time that he cant be left. Should i still keep up with leaving him for a few hours on some days? ( as and when it is appropriate after lockdown)
     
  2. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    Welcome to PF :) Your pup sounds lovely, what's his name?

    Yes it's a good idea to continue leaving him alone for various lengths of time - obviously it's a bit different with lockdown, but when you have the baby you're not going to be home all the time anyway with baby.

    However, his age struck me in all of this. At around a year old many dogs go through a sort of teenage stage, and it's not at all unusual for them to regress with behaviour such as the chewing. You might see other changes too - things that he might have always been great with might become an issue.

    You're approaching it the right way - don't leave things within his reach is a biggie, as well as providing appropriate chewing opportunities. Keep up with the training and mental stimulation - particularly important as he is a collie and needs a 'job'.
     
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  3. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    These changes could have more to do with reduced stimulation. Your young dog, a Collie at that, Is also in isolation.
    What are you doing to keep him busy and his mind active?
    It certainly would be good to try and leave him alone occasionally to try and head off any potential separation issues, but only if he's not bored
     
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  4. Always_worried

    Always_worried PetForums Newbie

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    We are walking him separately so as not to break the rules of leaving home, but he was used to 3 walks a day, he is off the lead on both his walks so he is still able to run around, his recall is excellent and he is very good at obeying commands when we are out. we have numerous puzzle toys so he is working for his food, we have found this is good to keep him occupied but also slows his eating down and we are keeping up with his training and tricks from his puppy classes. Could i be over stimulating him during the day, and not leaving him enough to keep him occupied overnight?
     
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  5. Always_worried

    Always_worried PetForums Newbie

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    His name is Skip. He is truly brilliant. He seems to be happy generally and i do think its a boredom thing when he is chewing he shows signs of guilt, tail between his legs and wont look at us when we go into the room and see what he has chewed.
     
  6. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Dogs shouldn't need stimulation overnight, they should sleep! Maybe you are overstimulating him somewhat. I'd be making sure he gets plenty of rest time, my collie sleeps pretty much all day inside and he is super chilled but also ready to go when I want him to be and gives me 100%.
    Dogs don't do 'guilt', what they do is appeasement behaviours in response to your emotions and behaviours, so you come in expecting him to be chewing something and he responds to this by his whale eye, ears back, tail tucked etc.
    At night I'd maybe leave one thing he can chew, and make sure there is nothing inappropriate around so he can only choose the right option. Limit his options so you he can pretty much only make the right decision, it's not fair to say you can chew this one thing here, but not the 20 other things in the room, he doesn't understand the difference.
     
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  7. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Your pup is at the age when he needs to chew as his adult teeth are settling into the jaw and this is always the worse chewing stage. Purchase two/three kongs and stuff them with soaked kibble mixed with cheese and put them in your freezer. Give him one at bedtime.
    For what it's worth, and I've owned and trained collies for well over 40 years, my youngest is still chewing and she's 3 yrs old. She has just started on 6 new kitchen chairs which were purchased to replace the previous 6 that she chewed beyond repair....!! With her it isn't over or under stimulation she just likes chewing. We are retired; she has my other two collies to play with, they are all walked off lead twice a day and she does at least 30 minutes training. They also have a huge garden and paddock to run in. OK she's an extreme case and I'm sure you'll find your pup will stop in the not too distant future.
     
    Sarah H and rona like this.
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