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Cavapoo and Working Full Time

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by BeauBrummell, Jul 11, 2017.


  1. BeauBrummell

    BeauBrummell PetForums Newbie

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    Hi there,

    I'm in search of some sound advice from people who know their doggies!

    So myself and partner are considering getting a puppy however do work full time. We would however look to get a dog walker, who would initially come by twice a day (once mid morning and once mid afternoon for two half an hour sessions) to take the puppy out to empty his bladder etc and then once the puppy was old enough take out for a longer 1+ hour long walk around midday.

    We're quite lucky in that we have a garden which then backs out into a private residents park, meaning it would be very easy for us to take him on walks before and after work in addition to the dog walker. We also spend a lot of our weekends on long walks and often find ourselves saying 'if only we had a dog right now...' or 'this would be perfect for a dog'.

    Although I feel the dog would get a lot of exercise, I do worry it could be left for 4/4.30 hours alone at a time and therefore could get lonely or distressed. We have been undergoing quite a lot of debate on this so any options/shared experiences would be welcome!

    Also should note we are looking to pick up the puppy at 10-12 weeks and would look to take 3 weeks between us off work. So the puppy would be 15 weeks once left alone for the first time.
     
  2. paulareno

    paulareno PetForums Member

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    its very tricky and you have to think, why you want a dog at all if you are full timer. me and my partner got poodle this april. she is still small. and when she was little it was easy - believe me they just sleep a lot!

    we took holidays to stay home and that was a bit pointless as puppy slept almost 8h a day.

    now she is 5months and we are back to work ( l work 2 days a week at home though). and its now that she actually needs twice as much attention!

    she howls and cries when left alone, we have a puppy playpan so we can separate her from the rest of the house - its better as she cant get hurt by biting cables and all...but dog should not be locked.

    she is home alone for 5h a day now and its horrible. we have dog walker - that is a must.

    you can make it work. but puppies are hard work when you dont train them enough.

    trust me after 2,5 weeks we were having second thoughts! and literally though we made big mistake.

    you will have to be strict with routine, strict with puppy sleeping in their bed. monitor what they chewing, where they peeing....

    its a lot.

    now our Bisquit is getting better - but biggest problem its howling and crying. she still does her business on puppy pads at home - but at least she uses those :)

    l know people think its all cuteness and giggles, but after 8h at work l am not sure you will be happy coming home to needy crying puppy, biting, running around, not listening, poo and pee, shredded papers and so on?

    l know people will say go for it you will make it work. that what we did :) its working for us now. beginning was horrible though !
     
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  3. dorrit

    dorrit PetForums VIP

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    Truth is yes the dog would likely survive. However bored dogs are destructive dogs, bored dogs are disruptive dogs and bored dogs are often badly behaved once they are taken out.

    4 or 5 hours a day all alone , would you leave a small child that long?
    15 weeks is no age at all...

    If you miss having a dog at weekends maybe you could volunteer as a dog walker for someone less mobile?
     
  4. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

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    Its possible for you to do it if you're prepared to take the time in those 3 weeks off to condition the puppy to being left alone built up over a certain amount of time. A crate will be a good idea to keep the puppy in as it keeps them safe, you can put items in there to chew like toys, stuffed kongs full of food etc. If they're trained right from the start, dogs can be left alone and will get used to it.
     
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  5. paulareno

    paulareno PetForums Member

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    crates are ok but for 1h or so during the day. dog is not a parrot...
     
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  6. bumbarrel

    bumbarrel PetForums Senior

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    New crates are ok but for 1h or so during the day. dog is not a parrot.

    So what about dogs that are crated at night.?

    My dogs are all fine crated at night and for about 3 hours in the daytime. Over many years my dogs are used to crates for more than 1 hour.
    Having said that I feel taking on a puppy and working full time is not patriculalrly desirable. Puppies need housetraing and socialising and training as they grow.
     
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  7. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Depends whether you want your puppy to chew on something dangerous whilst you are out for a couple of hours.


    I hadn't used a crate until I bought the dog I have now, prior to that puppies were closed off into a room that had nothing dangerous, valuable or poisonous that the pup might chew on. Puppies chew and they don't always chew on what you want them to. A crate is a good way of keeping a puppy safe until it's completely grown out of the chewing stage and can be trusted around the house.
    However leaving a young pup for a number hours in the day will not help with toilet training. Puppies have leaky bladders and they need to go out frequently until they have better bladder control. A pup left too long in a crate without being able to go out and toilet will mean it will toilet in the crate and toilet training will be difficult. Having a dog walker coming in only twice a day will not be enough at 15 weeks really. Can either of you get home at lunchtime or have relations or good neighbours who could pop in and take the pup out to toilet and play with it?
     
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  8. Wiz201

    Wiz201 PetForums VIP

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    there's a difference between a dog crate and a parrot cage. Besides, most dogs actually like enclosed spaces to sleep and some choose to use their crates for life.
     
  9. paulareno

    paulareno PetForums Member

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    lets agree to disagree. we have used playpen for our puppy and l would recommend that instead.
     
  10. sidevalve

    sidevalve Banned

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    So you work full time and with a few weeks training you seriously expect a puppy to 'get used' to the idea of being alone ? Really ? Do you want a dog as a friend and a pet or as some sort of status symbol ? Would you [as asked above] leave a child alone for hours at a time ? If you want a dog for the right reasons then forget the puppy idea and get an older dog [or even a much older dog] from a rescue centre that really needs a quiet home - an older guy or gal that's happy to snooze away a few hours in warmth and comfort while you're out. Otherwise forget it until you can offer a better home.
     
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  11. MiffyMoo

    MiffyMoo PetForums VIP

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    Wow!

    There are plenty of people who successfully raise well adjusted puppies and work full time. OP, Hopefully someone will come along soon who has done it and can give you helpful advice. A few of the above comments are extremely unhelpful.
     
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  12. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Plenty of people do work and have puppies. My niece and her husband did just that 18 months ago. They had about four weeks off work, one after the other, then had a dog walker come in twice a day, my niece came home at lunchtime and her husband was home by 5pm. He also went to a small dog daycare twice a week where they made sure he kept his toilet training lessons going. Luckily he was a calm easy going dog content to snooze most of the day despite being a working bred cocker. He gets walked before they go to work and when they get back home again.
    It can be done so long as you are prepared to put yourself out quite a bit and spend some money on dog walkers and/or dog daycare.
     
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  13. steveshanks

    steveshanks PetForums VIP

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    What about if the OP got a retired Greyhound, would that be more suitable?
     
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  14. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    Not necessary and not helpful.

    How can a Cavapoo be a 'status symbol'?

    A dog is not a child. I used to work and have dogs. If you're prepared to put in the time and effort, it can work. Not everyone has the luxury of being able to stay home with a dog.
     
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  15. Little P

    Little P PetForums VIP

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    There are plenty of ways to get a dog that aren't getting a puppy from a breeder. Your puppy won't be a long days walking companion for around the first 12 months

    What about a physically and mentally mature adult dog (1yr+) from a rescue who is already house trained and capable of being left alone between you leaving and the dog walker coming in?
     
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  16. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I have had a few puppies when I was working full time. No problems at all, though probably took longer to house train than the pups I have had when I am home a lot. Loads of people go to work and have dogs otherwise there would not be so many dogs around! Forget about the puppy stage, you can work round that but think about the 12 years plus of the adult life. Are you prepared to get up early to walk the dog before you go to work, either come home at lunch time or get someone else to let out /walk. Go for a good walk in the evening and not go out much in the evenings as the dog will need your company then. If that all sounds ok then get your pup and organise at least two times when the pup will be let out - and be prepared for toilet training to take a long time.
     
  17. magpie

    magpie PetForums VIP

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    When my sister got her puppy (cockapoo) last year, she only managed to have one week off with him before she and her husband had to go back to work. But he was only ever alone for a few hours (2-3 tops) at a time, so it worked out fine. Either myself or my mum popped in to see him late morning, my sister was home for lunch for an hour, and then her son was home from school just after 3.30pm.

    Freddie just turned a year old last week, and is perfectly well adjusted :)

    If it's a cavapoo you are after though, do take the time to find a good breeder who health tests, as cavaliers in particular have a lot of health problems.
     
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  18. Canine K9

    Canine K9 Bailey Woof

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    I'm going to go against other comments and say that if you are dedicated, you can make a puppy and working full time work. If you (general you) can stay at home or not leave your dog alone for longer than a couple of hours a day, that's awesome. But for most people, working full time is part of life and a dog can be perfectly happy with this life. I'm not suggesting getting a 2 month old puppy and leaving it alone for 12 hours a day. But it doesn't seem like the OP is going to do that- they've said they are planning on puppy sitters/dog walkers and have thought about how many hours the dog will be left alone for.

    I will say that you need to be dedicated- you can't really go out after work and you have to get up earlier to tire said dog out before work. You can't go out all day at weekends and leave the dog alone then too, because it was left alone all day whilst you worked in the week.

    No I'm not going to leave my 2 year old child alone all day, but my dog is not a 2 year old child. Of course you need to take precautions and build the dogs time left alone up before leaving it and you need to be sensible about a puppy and make sure the puppy is getting out a lot for potty breaks and attention, but dogs sleep a lot. Some dogs can't be left alone for long, but most dogs are fine with it providing they get the attention required.

    A puppy is going to be a huge strain when working full time, puppies are obnoxious little sods, which is the reason they are cute, if they actually looked like the gremlins they are nobody would have one :) They demand more time than adult dogs and I wouldn't like to leave a young puppy for any longer than 2-3 hours without a break. Most adult dogs, however, are perfectly fine to do a normal work day with a break in the middle. I would invest in lots of kongs and other enrichment and gradually build the time up your dog is by itself. If you would rather a puppy, then you need to put it a lot more work and time, but it is doable provided you are sensible about your expectations.

    In an ideal world, nobody would have to work and we could all stay home all day with our dogs. But it isn't an ideal world and if full time workers couldn't own dogs, there would be a heck more dogs in rescues. I've never met anyone yet who fit into the mold of "perfect dog owner", we all do our very best.

    I would reiterate the advice above about finding a reputable breeder of Cavapoos if you decide to go down that route. There are ethical breeders of them, but there are very few. A miniature poodle or Cavalier King Charles Spaniel would be easier to find a reputable breeder of, but if you want a crossbreed puppy, I would look up the health testing requirements of both Poodles/Cavaliers and make sure your breeder is doing the required tests for both breeds.
     
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  19. McKenzie

    McKenzie PetForums VIP

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    I would just add, consider what you would do if your pup has separation anxiety and CAN'T be left alone.
     
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  20. winterrose

    winterrose PetForums Senior

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    I'm still in school, so I'm out from 8am to 3:30pm most days. My parents work, and for two days a week, nobody will be at home during school hours.

    We have a neighbour that is willing to let the dog out throughout the day, but the gaps between the breaks wouldn't necessarily be good for a young puppy, so we went down the rescue route.

    Can I ask why you'd like a Cavapoo? :)
     
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