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Cats are sick, need advice to help them recover.

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Kinny2pussies, Sep 10, 2018.


  1. Kinny2pussies

    Kinny2pussies PetForums Newbie

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    I have two young cats, Harvey is 5 months and Oscar is 19 months.

    Harvey started showing signs of illness, runny left eye, which then spread/started in the right eye. That led to a runny nose, blocked nose and sneezing a lot. My house is covered in Harvey snot.

    I took Harvey to the vets for a checkup, but the vet couldn't confirm his condition. Harvey has had all his vaccinations, so it isn't cat flu. He has had eye drops (Isathal 10mg, 1 drop twice a day), Powder we have to put in his food (Bisolvon, 1 pinch to food daily) and Metacam (2kg dose daily). Harvey has been taking the medication for over 2 weeks, but his symptoms don't seem to be improving much.

    About a week ago as we brought Harvey back from the checkup with the vet, Oscar started showing symptoms. Oscar started getting runny/crusty eyes. So we took him to the vets and he's now on the eye drops (Isathal 10mg).

    Both cats have the same symptoms, runny crusty eyes. Oscar doesn't have a blocked nose and sneezing.

    They haven't lost their appetite, still eating (very healthy appetite), they play all the time, they both have regular bowel movements (they pooh like monsters). Apart from the visual signs of illness, you would never think they are sick?

    Can anyone suggest what to do? We've taken them to the Vets 4 times and have spent a small fortune on medication which doesn't seem to be improving their condition?

    Thank You.
     
  2. SuboJvR

    SuboJvR Joey’s Mummy

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    I would imagine it is something viral as this can take a couple of weeks or so to pass - it did for my boy. The eye symptoms are generally secondary to a viral thing, often respiratory in origin. Though sometimes a bacterial bug can take advantage and affect the eyes hence the drops.

    Vaccinations cover some viruses known to cause “cat flu” but not all and “cat flu” can be a general term used to apply to any respiratory virus, humans often do this too with influenza although often any upper respiratory thing gets called “flu”.

    I’m glad to hear they are otherwise normal! I would say just try and persevere and be patient, keep a close eye on the eyes and keep with the drops :)

    One day my Joey still had crusty eyes and the next he was completely fine! He had symptoms for about 2-3 weeks in total.
     
    stockwellcat. and Kinny2pussies like this.
  3. SuboJvR

    SuboJvR Joey’s Mummy

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    Oh I should have said that for cats the eyes are closely linked with their respiratory systems, so although the only thing we may see is eye related, the first suspicion is often a respiratory infection of some sort :)
     
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  4. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    The manufacturers of vaccinations for herpes and calici do not claim to prevent infection, only to reduce the severity of symptoms.

    Presumably your vet has checked for signs of Chlamydia which mainly involves eyes. Chlamydia is a type of bacteria so requires a course of antibiotics. Another respiratory condition is Bordetella which would also require antibiotics.

    Since your boys are not improving, it might be a good idea to have some swabs to try to discover exactly what they have.
     
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Kinny2pussies - cats as a species are prone to upper respiratory infections (URI's) which can present with symptoms such as sneezing, blocked nose, runny nose, runny eyes, loss of appetite etc. Any of these symptoms could indicate a URI is present.

    URI's are often secondary infections to viruses, and need treating with a course of antibiotics. (Though the antibiotics won't get rid of the virus.). Many vets (including my own) feel it is wisest to assume the cat has a URI when there are symptoms and treat accordingly with AB's.

    As QOTN commented, vaccinating a cat does not remove the risk of them catching one of the viruses that cause "cat flu". It only means that if they do, symptoms are usually less severe. I agree with QOTN I would ask the vet to take some swabs for a culture.
     
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