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CatCurfew

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Antonia Popova, Apr 6, 2021.


  1. Antonia Popova

    Antonia Popova PetForums Newbie

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    cat-bird1.jpg

    Hello, I hope you are all well!

    I wanted to start this threat in order to reach out and connect with other cat owners about an interesting issue. I, myslef, am a cat owner (and a dog owner), and I absolutely adore them both.

    As some of you might or might not know, domestic cats can have an impact on wildlife in urban areas. They can pray on small mammals and/or birds, and while this can happen in any part of the day, wildlife tends to be more vulnerable during the night due to low visibility.

    I believe it is important for pet owners to be responsible about their pets and the impact they can have to their surroundings. I wanted to share with some simple actions you can take towards protecting wildlife.

    • Colourful collars or bell collars for cats - they are great in signaling the presense of a domestic cat to prey, plus they are adorable
    • CatCurfew - as it was mentioned, prey is more vulnerable during the night, so it is a good idea to keep your pet cat at home during those hours (from dusk until dawn), plus you will know your pet is safe at home and there is a less chance they will get in any sort of accident
    • Neutering - it is beneficial for your cat, it will be and feel much more calmer, and it will help with preventing feral cats roaming the streets.
    Thank you for your time, I hope this turns into a nice discussion between cat owners and you can all share thoughts and experience! If you have any questions, please do not hesitate.

    Antonia

    P.S. Please follow @catcurfew on Instagram for more information and updates.

    brochure1.png brochure2.png
     
    #1 Antonia Popova, Apr 6, 2021
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021 at 11:40 AM
  2. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    You'll get no arguments here about a cat curfew or neutering being essential BUT collars are a big no, no. Even the quick release ones can be a danger - cats can get them caught up in branches or on fences and have been known to hang themselves.
     
    Arny, Kaleidoscope, Willsee and 3 others like this.
  3. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    The best and in my view , the only way to protect wildlife and cat life is simple ........Cat proof the garden , build an enclosure or if neither are possible do not allow free roaming so you will have no arguements from me about that.
    As for collars definitely I would never advocate their use, they can cause horrible injuries and worse and really don't help to prevent a cat from killing
     
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  4. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    Suburban and urban people cutting down trees and bushes , decking, artificial lawns concreting over front gardens for parking , pollution has a great impact on birds too. A lot depends on the individual cat , some become skilled hunters and kill many birds while others don't.
    If you decide to keep a cat inside then as has been said , fence your garden .
     
    #4 kimthecat, Apr 6, 2021
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2021
  5. ewelsh

    ewelsh PetForums VIP

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    One study has estimated that pesticides accidentally kill between 0.25 and 8.9 birds per hectare of agricultural area each year. Even if the birds don't ingest enough pesticide to kill them, small amounts of these chemicals can cause sub-lethal effects.
     
  6. bmr10

    bmr10 PetForums Junior

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    There, as far as I am aware, is no substantial evidence that cats cause a population decline in birds within the UK. However, this is a really important issue to me and I agree with your post but please don’t recommend collars. I’m fairly certain I once read a journal paper explaining that cats are able to change their behaviour to overcome the effects a bell has on their hunting. Additionally, collars are major strangulation hazards even the breakaway ones.
     
  7. blkcat

    blkcat PetForums Senior

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    Lunarags, lorilu and kimthecat like this.
  8. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    As bad as that . Shocking. :mad:
     
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  9. Antonia Popova

    Antonia Popova PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all for your participation, it makes me quite happy and I hope the thread continues.
    I have read about the effectiveness of colourful collars, and was aware that there is some danger to the cat but did not know it was that serious, nor that pet owners were so against it, so thank you.

    Also I really liked the idea of fencing your garden but thought many cat owners would not agree to that. How many of you have done that? Share pictures with the rest of us if you want to :)

    Antonia
     
  10. MilleD

    MilleD PetForums VIP

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    I have to say the picture of the cat and bird is pointless when talking about a dusk to dawn curfew. Pretty sure none of mine have ever caught an owl.

    And then the plug for Instagram follows.....
     
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