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Cat suddenly avoiding rooms & changed behaviour

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by Lucieatsea, Jul 16, 2020.


  1. Lucieatsea

    Lucieatsea PetForums Newbie

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    My cat has always been nervous. We had her as a rescue cat, she has been with us about 6 years & spends almost all her time in my daughters bedroom, she is her favourite person and will usually come looking for her & cry when she is not in her room with her. She is wary of my husband although he strokes her & often feeds her & never comes in our bedroom except in the morning to ask to be fed.
    For the last week she has been acting strangely, she will go into my daughters bedroom briefly but not sit or stay in there & wont get on the bed. She seems to go anywhere but, I find her on the bed in the spare room, on an old sofa in the conservatory all places she wouldn’t normally sit. My daughter is really upset & worried. The cat seems anxious but can’t think why. Nothing has changed in the room. We have tried enticing her in with treats & playing with her but she doesn’t seem interested. It’s really becoming stressful. Also think she may have fleas, she is grooming lots. Any advice gratefully accepted.
     
  2. ChaosCat

    ChaosCat PetForums VIP

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    Is your daughter’s room on the ground floor? Then it is possible another cat came to the window and bothered her. If that is the case a milky window film on the lower half might help your cat to feel safe again.
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Priv...5770802&ref_=sbx_be_s_sparkle_mcd_asin_0&th=1

    The overgroooming can be caused by anxiety. It can be caused by flea, of course. Are there little brown spots in her fur that turn red when moistened? That would be a sure sign.


    To help against anxiety there are calming plug ins (Pet Remedy, Feliway) or spot ons (Beaphar) or food additives (Zylkene, YuCalm)

    In my experience Pet Remedy, Beaphar and Zylkene work best, but that‘s different with different cats, I guess.
     
  3. Lucieatsea

    Lucieatsea PetForums Newbie

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    No the bedroom is not on the ground floor, no way for anything to get in. My daughter recently got some LED lights but had them for a few weeks before this happened & she had had them tuned off & unplugged for the last few days.
    We bought a new hoover but again this didn’t seem to coincide with the behaviour change. She hated the old hoover just as much as the new one.
    Usually inspect her for fleas etc when she is relaxed & lying on the floor in the bedroom but as she isn’t doing this it’s been hard.
    We sat in the floor & fed her treats but she refused to jump into the bed, even to get the treats.
    Considering she used to cry for my daughter if she was downstairs & not in her room, she is now spending no time with her.
     
  4. Lucieatsea

    Lucieatsea PetForums Newbie

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    I think we have some Feliway so will try that & maybe try one of the others you have suggested.
     
  5. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @Lucieatsea - any sudden change in a cat's behaviour should first be suspected as having a physical cause. Cats when they feel unwell or in pain will avoid or hide away from their human companions - just as your cat is avoiding your daughter.

    I'd recommend a check-up for your cat at the vet (as they are now seeing patients again for non-emergencies) as soon as possible, at least to rule out a physical problem.

    Is the cat's appetite good? If she is not eating as well as usual, she could have a dental problem.

    Is she pooing once a day and peeing several times a day (2 or 3 big pees, not lots of little ones) Do you ever notice her straining in the litter tray but leaving without passing anything?

    If you suspect she may have fleas it's better to treat her with a flea spot-on straight away (assuming you're not treating her protectively every month). if she has fleas it is also possible she has worms (note: one kind of tapeworm uses the cat flea as an intermediate host). So I would recommend giving her a total wormer as well (Milpro is a good one - you will need a prescription for it though).

    If she is an outdoor cat perhaps she has been in a fight with another cat? If so she might have been bitten by the cat and have an abscess. Abscesses are not always apparent for a few days as they are caused by puncture wounds and it's only when the abscess has formed below the surface of the skin you will find a lump when you examine her. Abscesses are painful and cause illness. They need treating with a course of antibiotics.
     
  6. Lucieatsea

    Lucieatsea PetForums Newbie

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    Can anyone recommend a spot on flea treatment I can buy on Amazon?
     
  7. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Advantage for cats is the best flea treatment on sale without a prescription. It is sold on Amazon, and at various online pet pharmacies and Pets at Home.

    https://www.amazon.com/Flea-Prevention-Cats-Over-Advantage/dp/B004QBDO0M

    https://www.vetuk.co.uk/advantage-flea-treatments-advantage-for-cats-c-3_660_873

    https://www.petsathome.com/shop/en/...eatment-(monthly-subscription-service)-p50004

    (this one ^^^ also comes with Dronspot spot-on wormer which kills round worms and tape worms)

    https://www.petdrugsonline.co.uk/advantage-spot-on-flea-treatment
     
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