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Cat psychology?

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by labougie, Apr 4, 2015.


  1. labougie

    labougie PetForums Newbie

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    I feed Oscar three times daily - 7 ish, 3 ish and 11 ish. He's recently taken to hustling me for food an hour or more before it's due. I won't give in, 'cos I don't want a fat cat. Occasionally, his hustling drives me to the point of putting him outside and barring him entry via the cat flap until it's food time. When I let him back in, he ignores the food and sits with his back to me for a half hour before going to get what he's previously been hustling for. What exactly does he think he's up to?
     
  2. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome :)
    Maybe he is genuinely hungry? How old is Oscar and what type of food and quantity are you feeding?
    Shutting him out isn't the answer, you need to work out why he is doing this.
     
  3. idris

    idris absent without leave

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    He's clearly every inch a cat. Wants what he wants now, contemplates when things don't go to plan, then makes you suffer for it after. It doesn't matter that he's cutting his nose off to spite his face by ignoring both you and the food. It's the showing of his displeasure that matters. Hang on, he's male, so times all of it by two. :D
     
  4. labougie

    labougie PetForums Newbie

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    He's neutered, around 7 years old (Battersea cat) 4.5Kg when he arrived a year ago and probably 5Kg now. He will only eat wet food and gets around 70g of that 3 times daily, so I don't think he's hungry and this behaviour has only recently appeared. My tendency is to agree with what Idris has said but I have difficulty getting my head round the idea of such self-defeating behaviour from an otherwise (seemingly) very smart animal!
     
  5. NWForest

    NWForest PetForums Member

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    Not sure how you think he may become fat if you give the same amount of food but a little earlier when he starts to realise he is hungry? I can see his point on this one. Why not oblige a little and see how that improves things for both of you ? He won't get put out and you won't be put out by the reaction you would have got.
     
  6. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    If this behaviour has only started recently then I'd say something is amiss. Either a health issue is making him more hungry or he is upset or stressed about something.

    Cats don't suddenly change their behaviour on a whim, it is always in reaction to something within the environment, or they don't feel well in themselves.

    At 7 yrs old he is a bit young to have Feline Diabetes Type 2, (which tends to affect older cats) but I'd discuss it with your vet and maybe the vet will want to do a blood test.

    Another possibility is he is producing excess stomach acid which could cause a burning feeling in his tummy and make him feel hungry more often. Feeding him a high protein diet that contains no cereals would enable him to digest his food more slowly as Nature intended for carnivores, so he wouldn't get an empty tummy an hour or so after eating.

    It would mean avoiding supermarket foods such as Whiskas and Felix which contain cereals as well as sugars, and buying better quality foods such as Hilife Chopped Chicken in jelly, Natures Menu, Wainwrights Pots or foods from Zooplus or The Happy Kitty Co.

    If you feed him a high protein, low carb food that contains no added sugars then if he gains weight it won't be as fat, it will be as muscle. And you'd be able to feed him extra.

    Another thought is to give him some fresh raw meat for a treat several times a week. e.g. pork, lamb, chicken wings, or turkey, as it would keep him satisfied for longer.

    I'd say he sat with his back to you when you let him in because he was too upset to eat his food straight away. He sounds like a sensitive guy - some cats are like that, others are much more resilient.
     
    #6 chillminx, Apr 4, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2015
  7. m1xc2

    m1xc2 PetForums Senior

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    +1. I would be immensely pissed off if I got locked out of my own home for being hungry, and I'd imagine you would too.
     
  8. labougie

    labougie PetForums Newbie

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    I'm pleased to report that he's given up on that particular tactic and he's back to being a normal happy mog, eating at regular times without hustling for food and also showing an increase in affection. He's restored my confidence in him as a cat who's smart enough to know when to cut his losses!
     
  9. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Sometimes a problem with our cats seems to get resolved without us intervening or understanding what has caused it in the first place. (Though there will always be a cause). Let's hope this is the case with your cat and the problem does not reoccur in future.:)
     
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