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Cat or Killing Machine?

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by throwaway0106, Jul 17, 2020.


  1. throwaway0106

    throwaway0106 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all - given that people were so helpful when I last posted, I thought I would turn to you for advice again!

    We have had Sid for a few months now. He's a four your old, very athletic tabby. He loves being outside and seeing all that nature has to offer.

    The issue is that he doesn't just observe nature - he wants to be actively involved! Over the past two weeks, he has managed to catch two just-born chicks, a bird, a mouse and a frog. Each time he comes back with it rammed between his jaws and looks very proud of himself.

    Whilst cats will be cats, it's beginning to cause us quite a lot of angst. This morning, after he had eaten 75% of the frog, he promptly regurgitated it. Aside from the unpleasantness of the poor frog that had a premature end to its life, and having to clean up regurgitated remains, we're really worried about what will happen we go away on holiday (or, frankly, even back to work once 'lockdown' ends).

    Given he likes to bring back his hunting spoils to the house, we're worried that we'll return after two weeks away (or a long day at work) to find a collection of dead, chewed up animals rotting in the house and piles of cat vomit seeping into our floors.

    Whilst obviously we will have people pop in to put food down for him whilst we're away on holiday, it's not realistic for them to check every room and behind/under furniture for any unwanted surprises.

    Does anyone have any advice on how to handle this behaviour? We need to find a solution that doesn't mean that whenever we're away from the house, we're constantly worrying about what we'll come back to on our return.

    Thanks very much in advance!
     
  2. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    On a day to day basis I’m not sure how you stop a free roaming cat from hunting or bringing his catch back home tbh.

    During the breeding season you could limit his access to outside and definitely keep him in at night.

    As for holidays, maybe he could go to a cattery?
     
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  3. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @throwaway0106 - when my neighbour goes away she leaves her cats in the care of a drop-in cat sitter. The cats have access to the kitchen, hall, stairs and one small bedroom where they sleep. Doors to all the other rooms are kept closed for the duration of the owner's absence.

    This was done specifically to stop the cats leaving dead or half eaten prey around the home. It seems to work, and if they do bring in prey they leave it downstairs in the kitchen or the hall where it's clearly visible to the cat sitter who disposes of it immediately.

    If you have a microchipped cat flap (or Pet Door) you can programme it so e.g. the flap locks after the cat comes in for their supper, stays locked all night, and opens after the birds have done their foraging for food in the morning.

    Frogs are not a normal prey for cats, because the frog is able to exude an unpleasant scent, through the skin, that makes them smell unattractive as food for cats. Hopefully your boy has learned his lesson that frogs are not worth eating, as he regurgitated it straight away.
     
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  4. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    I do hope you don't plan to let him roam outside while you are gone for 2 weeks?

    As for the rest, well that's what some cats do. If you let him roam, and he likes to hunt, it's what you are going to have to live with. You can cat proof your yard to keep him contained, that may cut down on the available prey he can find to hunt.
     
    chillminx likes this.
  5. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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  6. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    My mum out a collar with a bell on her cat as he sounds very similar to yours and it did work to an extent!!
     
  7. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    I always feel sorry for cats forced to wear bells. Cats have such sensitive hearing. Imagine having to hear that annoying jingle in your ears with every move you make. As for a bell stopping a cat from hunting, I doubt it will for long. A skilled predator knows how to move up to his prey without making a sound. It's just the rest of his daily living that he will be plagued by that incessant jingle.
     
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  8. Jumpman1

    Jumpman1 PetForums Junior

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    Tell that to Cosmo when he settles down on my laptop keyboad and mashes the keys :D

    beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beapbeap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap beap...
     
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  9. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    Terribly sorry I spoke! You’re obviously the expert!
     
  10. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Something he chooses to do, not something he is forced to wear. And he can get away from it any time he wants to. Not the same. :)
     
  11. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    Well my mums cat did not appear to be bothered by the collar and bell, I’m sure he would have tried to remove the collar had it irritated him! Which he did not once attempt to do.
     
  12. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Heres an idea , you try it ;).
    Attach a bell round your neck even just for 24 hours and see if you still think it is okay :)
     
  13. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    Well I don’t kill birds, frogs , mice etc, but yea I’ll give it a go
     
  14. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Not the point I was making as I'm sure you are aware.
     
  15. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    No well, there’s making points and just being judgemental for the sake of it isn’t there. You must have been a cat in a past life as you appear to know ( or think you know) how they feel/ think/ etc !
     
  16. ChaosCat

    ChaosCat PetForums VIP

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    This is rather ridiculous.
    You don’t need to have been a cat to know that a jingling bell around the neck 24/7 is very hard even for a human and that cats with their sensitive ears will find it even more unnerving.
     
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  17. Catstorm

    Catstorm PetForums Junior

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    Well many tests have been carried out as to whether bells cause any damage to a cats hearing , which they do not, and as for the bells being annoying, cats are able to adjust to sounds like humans. And cats being cats, they would be constantly clawing at them, which I’ve never seen. And in the interest of preserving the ecosystem , it’s a good option, a happy medium!
     
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