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cat injured in cattery.

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Kayleigh Franklin, Dec 17, 2018.


  1. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    I'm looking for advice. one of my cats were injured whist staying in a cattery and this injury will affect him for the rest of his life. the cattery has not bothered about this. they say they don't know how my cat was hurt and that's it. can anyone help me please??
     
  2. Citruspips

    Citruspips PetForums VIP

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    Maybe your vet or insurance company could advise you?
    What happened?
     
  3. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    The cattery should have insurance for precisely this sort of thing. I wouldn't expect them to know how he got injured - the chances of them seeing the accident are low.

    What is his injury and will there be ongoing vet costs? And what country are you in?
     
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  4. bluecordelia

    bluecordelia Footy

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    Could it be from a bad landing?
    I would hope the cattery would see the issue and have got vetinary advice and informed you too.

    I would leave my vet and insurance details if I ever use a cattery
     
  5. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    He had a ruptured cruciate ligament of his right hind leg. he had to have 2 emergency surgeries costing £2500.00. the cattery didn't seem bothered. he now has bad arthritis in his leg.
     
  6. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    we didn't notice till we got him home. he was crying but we thought it was because he missed us ( first time away in 3 years).
     
  7. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Are you saying that you didn't know of the injury until after you took him home? IE. The cattery did not inform you at the time? :confused:
     
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  8. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    nope. we got home and then rushed him to get. vet called me 30 minutes later after xray and told us. I called cattery but they said they didn't notice.
     
  9. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Oh I see. So you immediately took him to the vet after picking him up and taking him home?
    I'd expect an injury like that to be obviously noticeable but I wonder if he just stayed in his bed at the cattery and that's why they didn't realise?
    Do you think they are not telling the truth?
     
  10. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    He was walking about in the cattery as I was sent videos. when we went to pick up my cats from cattery my male was on top shelf but was crying. we noticed it as soon as we got in as he was limping. we checked his leg and he bit me. vet said very rare injury. I only wanted to find out how it happened but cattery said they don't know what happened.
     
  11. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    we are left with a 3 year old cat who has arthritis in his right hind leg, in constant pain, limping and on metacam for rest of life. he is a Maine coon who loves playing with his sisters and loves climbing but has to be monitored.
     
  12. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi @Kayleigh Franklin -

    A ruptured cruciate ligament is a serious injury as you say, and very, very painful for the cat. I would have expected cattery staff to notice your poor cat was limping, or barely able to move, or crying when he moved.

    One of my rescued cats has an old cruciate ligament injury, which my vet thinks probably happened to him as a kitten (long before he was rescued). There is no indication he was treated surgically for the injury and the knee has healed in a way that has restricted the mobility in the leg and given him a limp. However he has adapted well to using his 3 good legs and can jump, run fast on the level but cannot climb trees, or high fences.

    The vet advised me 6 years ago when I adopted my cat he'd soon get arthritis in the leg, but there have only been signs very recently of some inflammation in the joint (he is now aged 9). On the vet's advice I put him on Yumove supplement and it has helped reduce the inflammation and improved his mobility.

    As I understand it restorative surgery is usually effective in most cases at returning most normal function to the leg, so it is very unfortunate this has not been the case for your cat and he is still in constant pain and limping. How long ago did he have the surgery? What does the vet or the specialist say about his prognosis for further improvement in his mobility and reduction in inflammation?

    The two main pieces of legislation that have concerned catteries are the Animal Boarding Establishments Act 1963, and the Animal Welfare Act 2006. The latest and updated Guidelines to the Animal Welfare Act were issued in October 2018, and these affect Boarding establishments for cats (and other animals).

    The Animal Boarding Establishments Act 1963 required catteries to be licensed by the local authority and to abide by the conditions of the licence. If they do not they are in breach of the law. This still applies in the latest guidelines.

    The local authority requires catteries to ensure (amongst other things) that e.g. : accommodation is suitable with regard to construction, size, number of occupants, exercising facilities, temperature, lighting, ventilation, cleanliness and safety,

    Section 9 of the 2006 Act stated those responsible for animals (in England and Wales) have a duty to ensure reasonable steps are taken to ensure the welfare needs of the animals are met to the extent required by good practice. This includes: e.g. its need to be protected from pain, suffering, injury and disease.

    However accidents can sometimes happen even in the most well-run establishments. It is a question of whether the cattery was negligent and failed to follow good practice in caring for your cat. In the first instance you could make an appointment to discuss this with your local Citizens Advice Bureau, and be guided by them.
     
    #12 chillminx, Dec 17, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
  13. Kayleigh Franklin

    Kayleigh Franklin PetForums Newbie

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    This happened last October. Bruiser my male cat had to have 2surgeries to reconstruct his ligament 2weeks apart. Bruiser is now afraid to go in his box and anywhere new. it has affected him in more ways than we know. the owner of the cattery also has a vet practice next door but didn't seem to care about the affect this has had on Bruiser. Bruiser has been on easeflex 2x a day since to help with the movement and also has lots of fish for the omega 3 levels. Bruiser was healthy before he went over to cattery. now he has panic attacks when he goes away anywhere. my vet said it's just management. nothing we can do now but manage his pain and weight and exercise.
     
  14. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I am sorry to hear this. Poor Bruiser, bless him. x

    If you feel the cattery was negligent in its care of Bruiser, then you really should take legal advice as to whether it is feasible for you to pursue a case against the cattery owner. If the owner has a vet practice next door and is unconcerned about your cat, then you would be best to find another vet, I'd have thought.

    You can also contact your local authority and advise them of your unsatisfactory experience with the cattery.
     
  15. BritishBilbo

    BritishBilbo I work with cats + I live with cats. I like cats.

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    It’s worth noting that since October 2018 the animal welfare and licensing regulations have been completely rewritten and updated the 1963 act is out dated.

    I haven’t got my cattery 2018 regulations to hand but the regulations and policies for catteries have gone from about 5 pages to 25 pages it’s very very in depth now.

    It’s a very serious injury to happen at a cattery it’s a very difficult one to call really because it’s likely they won’t have witnessed it and in a confined space they may not of seen the limp as obviously as when he’s roaming at home. All catteries should have insurance to cover accidents at a Cattery. It’s a really hard one as it seems your Cattery is disinterested in getting involved. If I thought a cat had injured itself in my care I’d be very very concerned!
     
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  16. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Yes, the new Statutory Guidance from DEFRA issued in October 2018 for the boarding of cats is very detailed and elaborates greatly on the previous 1963 regulations. The essential purpose of the new Guidelines is the same as that of the 1963 Act, i.e. to protect the well being and safety of cats in boarding facilities.

    A boarding cattery has a legal duty of care towards the cats boarded with it, and an obligation to follow good practice in running a cattery. This overall legal responsibility has not changed but in the new guidelines the responsibilities are now finely detailed and are more in depth; and far more thorough record-keeping is now required.

    This is is the section of the new October 2018 guidelines for boarding cats, which is specifically relevant to the situation of @Kayleigh Franklin and her cat :

    "9.13 All animals must be checked at least once daily or more regularly as necessary to check for any signs of pain, suffering, injury, disease or 19 abnormal behaviour. Vulnerable animals must be checked more frequently. Any signs of pain, suffering, injury, disease or abnormal behaviour must be recorded and the advice and further advice (if necessary) of a veterinarian..must be sought and followed."

    https://www.gateshead.gov.uk/media/...tatutory_Guidance_for_Boarding_Cats_2018.pdf?
    m=636727821683070000

    So a cattery's responsibility to check for signs of illness or injury at least once daily has been specifically detailed in the new Guidelines, and this is a measurable requirement that was not given in the 1963 regulations.
     
    #16 chillminx, Dec 18, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2018
    BritishBilbo likes this.
  17. BritishBilbo

    BritishBilbo I work with cats + I live with cats. I like cats.

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    Yeah the new regulations are very specific and detailed there must be one full time staff member per 20 cats in too if catteries want the higher standards. We’ve just had our inspection this month we’re the first Cattery in the area to have the inspection since the 2018 regulations came out. We haven’t had our star rating posted out to us yet.
     
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  18. sandy-cat

    sandy-cat PetForums Senior

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    Also do check whether your home insurance includes legal cover as you could use that in this kind of situation to cover legal fees associated with pursuing the cattery.
     
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