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cat injection trouble

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by izzmol, Apr 17, 2017.


  1. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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    I took my cat to the vets last year for cystitis treatment. When she had her 2nd injection of cerenia she started vomiting and would not drink either. I was then backwards and forwards to the vets having blood tests, xrays and lots of other injections and tablets and it cost me around £2000 eventually. Something the vet gave her did make her better after lots of journeys. As I did not want her to set off being ill again I decided not to take her for her booster vaccination but this year I was invited back to the vets for an update of her vaccinations and after her 2nd injection of leucofeligen she was sick on the way home again and another couple of times. This time though she started eating and drinking again and has not been sick since but I feel as though my pets are being made ill on purpose so the vets get more money and am considering changing vets but not sure whether another vets would be any better.
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Hi @izzmol and welcome. :)

    Cerenia is prescribed for cats to treat vomiting. I have not heard of it making a cat vomit. The common side effects of Cerenia are drowsiness, lethargy, drooling, diarrhoea, loss of appetite. I guess the vet must have thought there was another cause to the vomiting, not the Cerenia, hence why your cat had some tests done.

    What was the medicine that helped in the end with the cystitis? Is your cat now clear of cystitis?

    It is entirely your choice as to whether you have your cat vaccinated against the usual illnesses. If your cat goes outdoors then it is probably advisable, but if she is an indoor cat who never goes into a cattery then she is less at risk and you may decide not to vaccinate. It is up to you to make an informed choice. The reminders from the vet of a booster being due are just helpful prompts, you are free to ignore them if you wish. :)

    Some cats may get mild side effects to the vaccine, though it seems IME to be the FeLV component which causes the reaction. The risks of the cat getting the feline leukaemia virus are higher in young cats and mine are aged 4 and 7 so I now have the vaccine boosters for them without the FeLV component. The vet is fine with my choice.

    It is your choice to go to whichever vet you wish. If you are not comfortable with your current vet and do not trust him/her then by all means switch to another one. You may find one you get on better with.

    The overwhelming majority of vets are going to be people who really care about the health and wellbeing of animals. They are not in the profession just to make money. But it is worth noting that vets have a lot of overheads to cover in running a practice, providing up to date equipment etc. And also that tests, scans and xrays can be very expensive these days, which is why many of us on the forum have pet insurance.
     
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  3. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    Could it have been Convenia which was given as a long lasting antibiotic to deal with cystitis? I have heard of some cats being rather unwell with this medication ( although my own cats have so far been fine when it was used) and the problem is that it stays in the system for weeks.
    I agree with @chillminx's comments regarding vets and will add that as owners I feel we need to do some research into common medical conditions and try to get some understanding of possible side effects of medications and vaccinations.
     
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  4. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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  5. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your reply I will look back in my records about the convenia. My cat is about 7 years old and will only eat dry food. I feed her a special urinary stress food as ordinary dry food and treats make her vomit anyway and she is an indoor cat mainly. Thanks for your advice.
     
  6. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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  7. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your advice it has been very helpful. My cat was given lots of different injections and tablets so not sure what originally stopped her vomiting etc. I was told that she will have cystitis for the rest of her life and was told to feed her a urinary stress diet. She will only eat dry food and is mainly an indoor cat. She is ok again now though and as you said about the vet thing it may be best just to stay with the vets I am with and let them know what happened next time I go so they can decide whether the vaccinations and other treatments are suitable next time. Thank you again.
     
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  8. LostSoul

    LostSoul PetForums VIP

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    a cat with cystitis wont necessarily have it for life, has your vet suggested a supplement like cystease?
    Getting more fluid into her diet can help, one of my females had cystitis twice in a month, she's almost 8 and she also eats mainly dry food and refuses wet but i changed her dry food made sure she had extra bowls of water around ( her favourite place to drink is from a glass left on the draining board) i give her cat milk just so she gets extra fluid and a cystease capsule every day and for 4 months she has been fine (touch wood!!!) Also feliway can help reduce stress and less stress means shes less likely to get cystitis. My sister also had a cat who had cystitis a lot, almost monthly for over a year, cystease and extra water have worked for her too and she's not had a bout of it for about 18 months now.
     
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  9. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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  10. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Cats with urinary tract issues need to be on a wet only diet. Don't you see how contradictory it is to feed a cat a dry diet in this situation? Any cat can be transitioned, it just may take a little effort on your part, but it can be done. Her health and quality of life depend on it.
     
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  11. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your reply about cystitis. I will try cystease. I was informed by the vets to give her plenty of water so she now has a cat mate water fountain from pets at home. I also have a feliway that I purchased when I introduced my cat to the dog to calm her down and it worked. I feed her a dry cat food for urinary stress and also one for cats with sensitive stomachs and she seems to be ok. She will not touch wet food at all.
     
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  12. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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  13. izzmol

    izzmol PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you for your message. I will try her with some wet food and see if I can get her to eat it. She has lots of water to drink around the house as well.
     
  14. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Cats cannot drink enough water to be properly hydrated on a dry diet. Healthy cats can't and a cat with cystitis can't. Your cat needs to be on a wet diet. Those foods are very poor quality and will ruin her digestion in addition to keeping her chronically dehydrated. Your vet will make a lot of money from you if you keep her on that food.

    It doesn't matter if she "won't touch it". This is because she's never had it and doesn't recognize it as food.

    it may take some effort on your part, but you can teach her that wet food is food and feed her better. Or you can struggle with urinary tract flare ups all her life and the chronic puking and IBD that eventually comes with feeding that horrible "food". Have a look at the ingredients in that bag of croutons. Is that really something you think is good for a cat?
     
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  15. LostSoul

    LostSoul PetForums VIP

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    If you do try cystease look for them online, I was buying them for £12 for 30 from pets at home but found 300 for £24 on eBay, brand new and sealed. Cats like to drink in random places and don't like water near their food, so try bowls in other rooms
     
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