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Cat hissing on first day

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by anaandanimals, Jan 5, 2019.


  1. anaandanimals

    anaandanimals PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all, I adopted a 6 year old cat today and seemed very friendly and kind on the journey home. After a while and when I was about to go to bed she started hissing a lot. We did nothing to scare her? Maybe she needed space? Any ideas as this is the first day. Thanks a lot
     
  2. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Hissing is part of a cat's way of communicating. She's saying, leave me be, I'm scared. Does she have a safe room to be in? Change of any kind is difficult for cats. What's her story?
     
    TriTri likes this.
  3. anaandanimals

    anaandanimals PetForums Newbie

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    She is for now staying in our front room with everything she needs. She had to be given away as the owner had health problems and couldn’t look after her. Do you think she’ll warm up to us?
     
    lorilu likes this.
  4. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @anaandanimals

    There is no reason why she shouldn't warm to you, given time to settle in, and find her feet. As lorilu says change is difficult for cats, and especially a change of environment as cats are primarily attached to territory. But cats as a species are very adaptable, especially a young adult of 6 yrs old.

    She just needs a chance to process all the new information her senses are giving her, about her strange new environment. The hissing is because she feels overwhelmed and needs some personal space.

    Keeping her in one room is excellent. Leave her plenty of food at night as that may be when she is most comfortable to eat, with the house us quiet. Spend time in her room with her, doing normal things, but leave her be, unless she comes to you for some strokes. Chat to her, or read to her so she gets used to the sound of your voice.

    Provide several little hidey holes for her in her safe room and never disturb her when she is in one of them. Cardboard boxes turned on their sides with the top flap down, placed in a corner and facing away from the room are good hiding places. High up places such as a tall cat tree are also good as cats feel safe being high up so they can scan the ground for any threats to their safety.

    A photo of your new furry companion would be nice, it possible, :)
     
    Lurcherlad, Jackie C and lorilu like this.
  5. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Oh yes. Just give her time. As much time as she needs, don't try to force anything. As chillminx advised spend time in her room to let her get used to your presence and scent. Sit quietly, read a book or whatever. Speak softly to her now and then, using her name a lot. If she comes to you, stay calm and offer your hand to sniff. Take it slow paying close attention to her cues. You'll all get there in the end.

    PS I think it's lovely of you to give this kitty a home. Please keep us posted!
     
    Lurcherlad and chillminx like this.
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