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Cat evicted at final straw

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by BobbyBrwnPants, Apr 16, 2019.


  1. BobbyBrwnPants

    BobbyBrwnPants PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone and thanks in advance for your replies.

    I'm at the end of my tether with one of our cats that we rescued from the streets of Sheffield. She's been with us for about 8 years after turning up one winters snowy night and we let her in through the cat flap that was already in the door when we moved in.

    We checked for a chip and put up posters etc. but no one claimed her. We suspect she'd been processed by a Sheffield based feral cat charity who catch, spay/neuter and release as when we tried to use the voucher given to us by RSPCA the vets said she had already been spayed.

    Anyway... she started spraying in the house and at first we thought she was just marking the place as her own since she'd not lived there before. We cleaned it up properly and installed some Feliway plugins. The spraying calmed down but she'd still spray on anything new we brought into the hose.

    Fast-forward 5 years... we've moved house and got a 2nd cat. They tolerate each other very well and will sleep next to each on the settee when we've sat watching telly. They even play in the garden together once in a while. They have separate feeding areas, 3 litter trays, multiple plugins and can come and go as the please with our smart cat flap but.... she's still spraying. The new cat who was also a rescue and spayed at 2 years old while in the early stages of being pregnant has never sprayed once.

    Anything new we bring into the hose, flowers, bags and rucksacks that we take out of the house and then bring back, never shoes though. She also sprays anywhere that the new cat sits even if she doesn't ever sit there and recently she sprayed on the bathroom bin, while I was sat on the toilet and into the back of my car when I left the boot open taking things into the house.

    She must know it's wrong as she'll do it in front of us and immediately run out of the house and not come back for hours. When she sprays in the garden she doesn't run off at all and it seems she's only doing it in places to spite us / the other cat.

    She's sprayed this morning on a rucksack which the other cat sat on top of last night for 10 minutes while I was eating my tea and it's all over the settee, the rucksack and everything else that was on the settee.

    I've chased her out of the house and removed her from the cat flap memory so she can't get back in but I just don't know what to do now other than to buy a wendy house or something and to install a new cat flap and make her live outside / in the wendy house.

    I feel terrible but I'm also really angry and sick of it.
     
  2. sandy-cat

    sandy-cat PetForums Senior

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    You've had her for 8 years and you're putting her out of the house? This makes me really sad. You're her home. Have you had her chipped now and have you spoken to a vet about her behaviour?

    If you can't deal with her behaviour then please give her to a local cat rescue, don't just exile her from the house.
     
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  3. sandy-cat

    sandy-cat PetForums Senior

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    #3 sandy-cat, Apr 16, 2019
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2019
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  4. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    So sad ,poor girl :(.
    If you havnt already then I suggest you have her examined by your vet,no cat behaves the way you have described out of choice.
    She is either ill or stressed.
    If you cant or wont deal with this issue then you have to give her to a rescue ,you cant just abandoned her outdoors.
     
  5. MaggieDemi

    MaggieDemi PetForums VIP

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    It could be a UTI. Does she eat a lot of dry food? Maybe try switching to wet food and see if that stops it.
     
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  6. SpringDance

    SpringDance PetForums VIP

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    Could be a UTI (should you be kicked out if you developed one?)
    Could be stress (aren't we beginning to understand this more in humans nowadays?)

    At the least you need to visit the vet. She's a cat, not a human and you need to take the time to understand her communication.

    If all else fails, don’t kick her out, at least find a rescue who will take care of her.
     
  7. MaggieDemi

    MaggieDemi PetForums VIP

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    If it's a UTI, try getting some Amoxicillin from your vet, that should clear it up. And switch to canned food or at least have the majority of her diet as canned food. Let us know if this helps! Cats don't usually do these things on purpose, there's usually a medical reason for it.
     
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  8. Quartermass

    Quartermass PetForums Senior

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    Some compassion for op is needed here. Under the stress and desperation caused by this situation people will get frustrated. All OP had done is temporarily keep the cat from keeping back in until a solution is found.

    I do agree with the advice to visit a vet, to switch from dry to try to rule out renal issues etc but please don't be so hard on OP who has a whole family to look after not just one cat and is trying his best.
     
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  9. BobbyBrwnPants

    BobbyBrwnPants PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone

    Just to put your mind at ease, I love both my cats, very much so and it really does break my heart to put one of them out of the house but I don't know what else I can do at this stage.

    They both have the highest level of insurance possible and receive the highest quality of care possible. We've feed them on Applaws wet and dry cat food since we've got them although the cat who's causing the trouble has been on Hills Prescription Diet food for 2 years which we've bought without fail since she was diagnosed by the vets.

    They both visit the vets every 6 months and both are up to date with all their shots, worming, flea, tick and every other treatment. They don't wear collars and we have a microchip cat flap so as they can come and go whenever they please.

    Thy sleep with us in the bed, have loads of their own furniture and are given lots and lots of attention as I work from home most days.

    The cat who's causing the problem isn't displaying new behaviours, she's always sprayed, sometimes more and sometimes less however we've just put up with it until now. We've had her tested at the vets for a verity of issues which is how we found she had an overactive thyroid and needed the Hills Prescription Diet food. We've seen a behavioural specialist and carried out all of the recommendations they made but it hasn't stopped her spraying.

    I appreciate you're looking out for the best interests of the cat and I myself volunteer for a local Facebook missing pets group with over 17,000 members. I have a microchip scanner and I have reunited stacks of people with lost pets and helped re-home found or unwanted pets from the whole of the Yorkshire but I just do not know what to do with my cat anymore.

    I really do want to keep her and keep looking after her the best possible way I can but I can't have her spraying on everything in my house. It's horrible to wake up to and is costing me a fortune in replacing unwashable fabric items and removing the spray from my settees and everything else.

    I appreciate all the help and suggestions and if giving her up is the only way for us both to be happy and for her to have the same level of care I've given her over the last 8 years then I'll do it. I'll even keep paying for all her needs I'm just at that place where I don't know what else I can try.
     
  10. MaggieDemi

    MaggieDemi PetForums VIP

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    Is that a dry food? That could be causing it.
     
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  11. BobbyBrwnPants

    BobbyBrwnPants PetForums Newbie

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    It could be but we've had her at the vets about 2 months ago and everything's fine. It's also not a new behaviour so she'd have to have been sick for the lat 8 years without anyone picking up on anything even when the vets did £800 worth of blood tests to rule out loads of stuff. And she was spraying while on wet food before the Hills Prescription Diet dry food too.

    I'm beginning to suspect that before we rescued her she's been a feral cat who sprayed her territory while living on the streets and she's just never going to stop. I just need to find out if there's some kind of miracle chance that we haven't tried everything and we can get her to stop and we can all live happily.
     
  12. MaggieDemi

    MaggieDemi PetForums VIP

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    Was she on all wet food, no dry food?
     
  13. BobbyBrwnPants

    BobbyBrwnPants PetForums Newbie

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    Yeah, half a tin of Applaws cat food day and night.
     
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  14. Quartermass

    Quartermass PetForums Senior

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    Hmm. Are you aware that applaws is not complete food, it's supplemental? At least I'm near certain it's not complete.
     
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  15. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    The Hills t/d is a horrible diet, and will probably eventually kill her as it is iodine deficient. Iodine is an essential nutrient for cats. This cat is likely in her senior years if she is hyperthyroid. Why not have the I-131 treatment done and put her back on a normal wet only low carb diet, for starters. Or just give her the medication for hyperthyroid treatment.

    I agree it is cruel to shut her out of the house considering she is accustomed to sleeping with you and the other cat and is a part of the family.

    Cats don't spray out of spite. She looks at you when she does it because she is trying to tell you something is wrong. She is doing it because something is wrong and this is the only way she knows how to communicate with you about it.

    There is no test for stress induced cystitis. There is no way to determine if her urinary tract is continually inflamed. If you are feeding the dry Hills (which contains NO MEAT at all) is certainly causing inflamed bladder and urinary tract. It's extremely high in carbs besides which causes an alkaline environment both in the digestive tract and the badder.

    Has the vet not offered the option of medication? I am not one to jump to drugs, but if drugs will keep this cat in her home, then it should be considered. Amitriptyline is often prescribed for these cases, or fluoxetine ( "kitty prozac".)

    She will have to be kept inside or allowed out only in a cat safe area outside when beginning the medication. After she has been on it a while and you can observe how it affects her, once her body adjusts, perhaps she can be let to come and go freely again.
     
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  16. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Having fantastic insurance and giving all the care money can buy cant and wont replace compassion .
    Your poor cat is suffering either physically or mentally and shutting her out of her home is IMO cruel.
    You either commit to finding out what is causing her to spray or you give her to someone who is willing to put some time into finding out what is wrong.
    I don't mean this to sound harsh but it probably does,right now my concern is for your cat .
    Would it be possible to confine her to a room that is easily cleaned , preferably with outdoor access as she is an indoor/outdoor cat at least until you try to find out what is causing her to spray
     
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  17. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @BobbyBrwnPants - I sympathise with your predicament, having myself lived with an adopted rescue cat who sprayed indoors. It is not easy.

    Your cat has been thoroughly checked over by the vet for a physical problem causing the spraying and nothing has been found to account for it. And you have tried feeding her a diet of wet food only, no dry food, which made no difference to how much she sprayed. Then you are left with the likelihood that it is a behavioural problem that she acquired while living rough (before you adopted her).

    Unfortunately not all such acquired 'anti-social' behaviour in the house ceases once a cat has been neutered, particularly if she was not spayed until quite a while after reaching sexual maturity. The behaviour becomes a habit, almost second nature, and such a habit is hard to break.

    Plus, the cat may be spraying copiously not just to scent mark but also to comfort herself whenever she feels insecure or stressed. Some cats do this. Who knows what her history is, she may always have had an anxious nature, but her life experiences as a stray can't have been pleasant.

    You mention she has been with you about 8 years and presumably wasn't a kitten when she arrived, so she could well be aged about 10 or even 11 possibly. In which case she is approaching her senior years and her behaviour is unlikely to change much now, being realistic. She has reached the point in her life where she will need extra care and I think for her to live outdoors in a shed or Wendy house is not really going to be the best thing for her, even if you heat it for her in winter. For one thing she is going to be lonely without much human contact and this may cause her to wander off and become a stray again. :(

    The way I managed my situation was to restrict my cat's access to a couple of rooms in the house - the kitchen and the downstairs utility room both of which had tiled floors which were easy to mop clean daily. It was not ideal for my cat, but he managed to adapt to these limitations quite well. It was certainly an improved situation for me.

    I also put him on a long-term course of Zylkene ( a supplement) which while it did not stop all the spraying, certainly reduced it to a more manageable level. He seemed to be much less stressed and I was less stressed by the situation too. Perhaps because I was calmer, he sensed my changed mood and it helped him feel calmer. Cats are highly sensitive to our moods.

    My cat was about 13 when I adopted him and the way I looked at it was that he was not going to be with me forever, and so my aim was to manage the situation and look after him as well as I could for the rest of his life. He went to the Bridge at the age of 17.
     
  18. BobbyBrwnPants

    BobbyBrwnPants PetForums Newbie

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    Without being rude and with the upmost of respect, you’re all on your arses if you think I’m some sort of compassionless monster and I don’t really have to justify myself to you all.

    Your theories are flawed in that despite the changes in her food over the last 8 years and over 30 trips to the vets and behavioural specialists she’s carried on spraying regardless.

    There’s no need to question my ability to care for my cats or my willingness to resolve the issue. Let’s have more suggestions of what I can or might not have tried already and hopefully we’ll get to the bottom of it as I love her dearly and really want her to stay.
     
  19. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Okay I'm out,
     
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  20. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Perhaps you ought to read your thread again. I see many helpful suggestions here that you have not tried from medication to diet improvement to modifications you can make in the home to ways to help you understand what is happening with your cat..

    We want to help the cat.
     
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