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Cat Bells and collars

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Rob O'Shaughnessy, Apr 27, 2017.


  1. Rob O'Shaughnessy

    Rob O'Shaughnessy PetForums Newbie

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    We've recently felt we needed to collar our 1 year old cats after they have started to bring in bit of birds and worms but a few days into this we've found our female cat out late and when she finally came home, was distressed dirty and clearly had a hard time. We checked our cctv, not a snob or very rich its just my job ! to view Rosie been hunted by another dominant cat and now questioning the idea .Advice and points of view folks ?

    Rob
     
  2. 1CatOverTheLine

    1CatOverTheLine PetForums Senior

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    Opinion: birds have the same right to Life as do any other animals.

    Pet owners have a responsibility to keep their pets safe and healthy, and that responsibility is absolute and inabdicable. I know of absolutely no Parents who would permit their toddler(s) to play outside after midnight without supervision.

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  3. Izzy95

    Izzy95 PetForums Member

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    I don't really like collars on cats as I worry about them getting caught, if you do get a collar for her please make sure it's a safety collar, the catch will come apart if she gets caught on something. My cat comes in at night, he also has or problems with our neighbours cats but it's a quiet road with lots of cats and they always bump into each other so it's inevitable here.
     
  4. Jonescat

    Jonescat Don't do nothing. Do something.

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    Make sure it is a safety collar - too many stories of dreadful accidents with the other sort. And in my experience it doesn't take long for a cat to learn to walk quietly with a bell so it does no real good. Most birds/wildlife are caught at night so I would say the best bet is to keep her in at nights.

    Did the collar work for worms? ;)

    The other thing is if your cat is being bullied then the bully cat will do it regularly until you break the cycle by keeping her out of the way - when it might forget about her and try somewhere else. I would expect it to come round every night specifically to chase your cat out of its new territory, until your cat is no longer a threat to it. This could lead to all sorts of problems for your cat, including fear of going out, or worse, fear of coming home. Again - keep her in at nights, don't let it become a habit.
     
  5. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    Not a fan of collars,safety or otherwise,read far to many stories of nasty injuries and worse caused by them,even the "so called" safety collars .
    As for bells,if you really must put a collar on your cat please remove the bell,it must drive them insane hearing that constant tinkling in their ears and please keep your cats in after dark,it is the worst time for injuries to occur.
    As you might guess I'm actually not keen on allowing cats to "free roam" not only for their safety but also for the safety of our precious wildlife.
     
  6. leashedForLife

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    for the record, BELLS are only of slight help to alert wildlife to the presence of a cat - the cat speedily realizes that her or his targeting & killing successes are greatly reduced when the bell sounds, so s/he adapts, & moves so carefully the bell is noiseless until the final pounce... Too late for the hunted wildling to avoid being punctured. :(

    There have been multiple formal studies of cats wearing bells vs sans bells - the drop in killing success is short-lived.
    Cats aren't stoopid.
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    On the wildlife end of that interaction, any wildling punctured by a cat's tooth or claw is also short-lived - no joke. :(
    Almost 90% of all the wildlife who survive the initial attack of a cat, but who do NOT receive antibiotics, will die - a single cat-claw in a small animal can cause a massive infection that limits the victim's ability to move, find food, water, or shelter, or evade other predators. // Most die within days, generally 24 to 48-hrs; a few larger animals, blue jay sized birds or an adult cottontail, may last 3 to 5 days, then die of thirst & fever. Their organs fail.
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    I worked as a volunteer with WRI, Wildlife Response Inc, of Va Beach, VA, for 6 years; in Spring nesting & fledging season, & again in Fall during the 2nd small-mammal nesting season, a full 90% of our patient intake was cat-attacks; the remainder of the calendar year, cat-attacks provided 75% of our patient intake.
    That means every other cause - frostbite, starvation, fishhook or fishing line, HitByCar, dog attack, orphaned / lawn mower / chain-saw, etc, only made up a combined maximum of 10 to 25% of all our patients' root causes.
    :Meh "not keen on free-roaming cats" is an enormous understatement; wildlife have a right to live, breed, rear their young, etc, without incessant year-round mortality & distress due to housecats, subsidized & wandering at will.
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    spotty cats likes this.
  7. Erenya

    Erenya PetForums VIP

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    I'm curious why you think the collar might be the cause of the bullying. It might have been going on for a while and it's a coincidence that it's come to light now.

    Have you thought of cat proofing your garden?
     
    leashedForLife likes this.
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