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Castration

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by tapper, Jan 3, 2012.


  1. tapper

    tapper PetForums Junior

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    Evening,
    Can anyone give me some advice, either from personal experience or from a professional point of view as to when its preferable to have a dog castrated. My pup is a border collie/springer and at 5 months is quite a large lad. I have heard tell that its best to wait until they are cocking their legs whilst others have advised that its best to have them done about 6 months old.
    Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    If you must (ask yourself why: is he humping? That's learnt behaviour and you need to train that out as he'll probably carry on even if neutered. Do you have a bitch?) leave him til 12-18 months. If you leave him whole, he won't grow as leggy (fewer potential joint problems therefore if left whole) as testosterone helps to close the growth plates earlier.

    The obvious reason for castration is potential testicular cancer, but this is external obviously and often fairly visual. The dog is at less risk from bone and other cancers if left whole.

    From personal experience, none of mine are neutered and one is quite an under-confident dog so taking away his bits might take away some of the little confidence he has.

    It's a personal choice, but I fail to see why it's routinely done as it's not necessary from a health POV. If the dog is an escape artist, it may help with roaming, but TBH, you should sort that with decent fencing (although my springers can get over 5 foot fencing, but choose not to).

    Your vet will tell you to do it because it's routine and the bread and butter money for him.

    As long as your fencing and recall are good, it seems pointless to neuter, but that's just my opinion.
     
  3. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    I am not sure why you mention the size of your dog, but if it is because it wories you, are you aware that castration prior to pubertly delays the closure of the growth plates resulting in taller dogs?

    WHat is the rush?

    Why not wait until your dog is physically mature at least ie circa 18 months.

    Unless you have no control over him, no fenced garden and entire bitches in the house.

    Castration can minimise some health risks but increase others.

    Look here

    Canine Sports Productions: Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine Athlete

    http://www.naiaonline.org/pdfs/LongTermHealthEffectsOfSpayNeuterInDogs.pdf

    As for cocking their legs, I am not sure what that has to do with the price of fish either, some dogs NEVER cock their legs despite being entire.
     
  4. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    I know exactly where you are coming from many, many years ago six months was classed as an adult dog and thereby was an acceptable age to castrate. Bitches it was said to have them spayed after one season, some experts suggested after a litter.

    Today with the knowledge available it is wise to wait until the dog is at least a year to two years old.

    There are pros and cons/fors and against as to why a dog should be neutered. My only reason for neutering a dog would be as a condition of sale from the breeder or rescue.
     
  5. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    My two at nearly 19 months, still rarely cock their legs. I've been told that you should wait til the dog is cocking before neutering, think by my vet, actually! :eek: At this stage, I have no intention of neutering. Doubt I ever will.

    Did I read somewhere that in America, the big rescues (and possibly the RSPCA here? :eek:) do it at 6 weeks?! :eek: :mad5:
     
    #5 cinnamontoast, Jan 3, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2012
  6. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    Your vet sounds like mine, all my dogs have been entire males. I may have been lucky, but I have never had a problem with them so no point having them castrated.

    When I was in two minds, we spoke to our vet who said he will put weight on and become girly - that did it, hubby's voice went two octaves lower and said No he isn't having it done. It was like a threat to hubby's manhood - so funny.

    However I was interested to know that there is an injection that can be given that lasts about a month, I can only assume reduces the male hormone which can be used as a trial ie if your male dog is displaying unwanted hormonal drive behaviour, you can see if by having him castrated would reduce these behaviour problems ie dominance (over other dogs), humping, poor recall because of bitching that type of thing.

    My lad is 6 1/2 the only surgery he will have is on medical grounds.
     
  7. cinnamontoast

    cinnamontoast Sois pas chiant, chéri.

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    The injection apparently increases the risk of testicular cancer later in life, I think. I toyed with the idea when looking at options for my fear aggressive dog, but having lost one age 7 last year to cancer, there's no way I'd want the risk.
     
  8. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    I didn't realise that about the injection, which defeats the object. One of the reasons why people have their dogs castrated is to reduce the risk of cancer.
     
  9. Staffybull

    Staffybull PetForums Member

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    Why would you want to do this?

    I would never even consider such a thing,all my past dogs have all been boys,and yes they do get a little frisky but this is easily controlled with the correct tone of voice!

    In my opinion this does not calm a dog down,and is unnatural,poor boy if you decide to castrate!!!
     
  10. lydan9gj

    lydan9gj Banned

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    Castration is a good way.[​IMG]
     
  11. emmaviolet

    emmaviolet PetForums VIP

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    when billy my last dog, an entire dog all his life but was so calm no need to even suggest castration, he had an enlarged prostate at 13 and instead of having the op or injection he had hormone tablets that lasted about 6 months.

    they made him more active then he was and eat like a horse.

    if there is nothing wrong with your dog and he does not mate with bitches i dont feel you need him fixed just now.
     
  12. tapper

    tapper PetForums Junior

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    Firstly thank you for all your replies.

    However, I have to say, as a new member to this forum I do feel that there is a certain amount of pompousness in some of the replies, yes, some have had positive experiences with entire dogs whilst others however have not. The latter replies seem to be far more helpful and at least less judgmental. People come onto these forums to get advice but I fear it seems that they get rather more judged (experience of other subjects ) than advised or helped. Obviously I will do what is best for my dog and my circumstances , and I am not without sense, but please please in your answers to folk dont put them off.

    Besides this, thank you all for your replies, and I do appreciate them all
     
  13. GoldenShadow

    GoldenShadow PetForums VIP

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    I am probably more for neutering than against it but with a breed like mine (retriever) would not want to do it before 18 months. Golden was done at 10 months which in hindsight I feel was too soon. Lab was done at 17 months three weeks after getting him because he needed a tooth removing ASAP and so the two got done together under that vet's recommendation.

    If I got a dog pup again I would see how they go before deciding what to do but wait til at least 18 months in a medium or large breed.
     
  14. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    I posted this just a few mins ago on dog chat, so copied it - lazy eh? ;)


    There's no rush, his testicles will remain where they are are why not let the dog properly mature to at least 18 months? I can't understand why vets are so keen on neutering a dog so early - my vet said he would "do" T-Bo as soon as he could get purchase on his lil nuts - no way, he's one year old on Friday and his nuts are going nowhere for another few months, in fact if at all!

    If there is any truth in a dog not maturing properly if he is neutered too soon, if there is any truth in growth plates not developing properly without testosterone, if there is any truth in retaining puppy behaviour if neutered too early, then there is no need to do it until he is at least 18months old. If there isn't any truth in any of these statements then there isn't any harm done in waiting but if there is some truth in them, then there is a lot of potential damage to be done by removing that hormone too soon.

    In a single dog household I wouldn't neuter at all, none of my previous dogs were neutered and the only reason these guys are is because they live with many other dogs and hormones could stir up trouble. I have never had nervous male dogs before but I do now and I wonder if neutering is the reason why, even though they were done between 18months and three years. Never had a thundershirt in my house before in 40 years of dog ownership but do now.

    Err on the safe side and wait for maturity or don't do it at all!
     
  15. rkd78

    rkd78 PetForums Newbie

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    they probably do. my pup is 16 weeks old,when we took him for his last injections last week.the vet said he'll castrate now it will be cheaper because he was under 10kilo. i turned him down point blank.

    the mrs wasn't to impressed tho
     
  16. tapper

    tapper PetForums Junior

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    Thanks again for all your replies, I will heed your advice and wait and see how he matures and if there are any problems re wandering or hankering after ladies. Regarding waiting for maturity etc., you are all so right, having had horses for most of my life I realise the importance of waiting until at least 4 years of age before starting them off , so yes why not wait until a dog has grown physically too. Thanks again, our Nobby gets to keep everything for the time being :D
     
  17. tapper

    tapper PetForums Junior

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    Thanks and yes I feel the same, after a very neglected start in life he is now living the way he should and the recall is getting there. I guess I will just have to see how things go but it doesnt sit right with me to take things away that dont need to be unless for a medical or behavioural reason.
     
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