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Cane Corso, Bullmastiff, or Dogue De Bordeaux?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by a12345, Jul 4, 2020.


?

Which breed would suit us?

  1. Cane Corso

  2. Bullmastiff

  3. Dogue De Bordeaux

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. a12345

    a12345 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi guys - I’m about to get a dog for my family, as my oldest son is very eager to do so. He’s done quite a lot of research and is confident that even though we are inexperienced, he should be able to train the dog effectively. I was just confused however, as I’ve heard that mastiff breeds are quite stubborn and hard to train? Not to offend anyone who has the breed of course, but I have no where near as much knowledge on this topic as my son has. We typically need a large, protective dog (for us and our home) that doesn’t need too much exercise, like a German Shepherd or a Rottweiler. Also a dog that would probably be not too much of a challenge to train? I’ve asked my son about this and he’s kept on telling me that it’s pretty much impossible to find the perfect breed, and sacrifices would have to be made. I typically would like a fairly easy to train dog mainly as I don’t want to give my son too much of a challenge. If anyone could match us with a breed, or even a breed outside the three, we would really appreciate it! Thanks for your time! (Also if you don’t have time to respond, please do the poll)
     
  2. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    The breeds you mention are not for inexperienced owners.
    Any dog will protect what ever there size.
    All large and medium dogs need lots of exercise.
    Every dog is different to train, breed doesn't matter, we had two dogs of the same breed and they couldn't have more different.
    How old is your son?
     
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  3. a12345

    a12345 PetForums Newbie

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    He is 15. I know he seems young but I’m quite surprised with his knowledge. Obviously knowledge is different to applying the knowledge and I appreciate that, but everyone has to start somewhere right?
     
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Absolutely. But you don't put a learner driver, even one who has passed his theory test, into a performance sports car. I just wanted to make that analogy.

    Are you in the UK? Because, if so, a dog that will protect you and your home is something you perhaps could explain in a bit more detail - I'm concerned you might fall foul of the Dangerous Dogs Act.
     
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  5. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Why do you need a protective dog ? I have boxers a good size , they do need around 1 hour exercise a day but do like more. Good fun for a family and respond well to training. They have a fierce bark but to be honest if someone broke in I’d be protecting them because they mean the world to me.
     
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  6. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Sorry but breed very much does matter. There is a reason cowboys don't herd cattle with bloodhounds while riding Clydesdales :D
    Some breeds are far more suited to certain tasks than others. Among those tasks - being a pet, who can be handled by multiple people, vet, groomer, dog walker, kennel worker, visitors to the household etc., go for walks in populated areas, and do regular pet dog stuff without excessive levels of stress.

    @a12345 none of the breeds you list are an appropriate choice for a first time owner, I don't care how much your teenager has read up on them. The internet is rife with misinformation about dog breeds and how to train them, and the reality is, a) any breeder of these breeds who is in any way worth their salt will be very hesitant to sell you a dog, which means you're left with less than acceptable breeders with dogs of questionable temperament making them an even worse option.

    You may find a DDB breeder of good quality willing to sell to you, but the other two breeds I highly doubt it.

    Cane corso are what you might call a 'specialist' breed. The well bred ones with correct temperament are very sharp and not a dog you can easily walk with the family in normally populated areas and not expect them to have issues. There is a trend in the breed to try to water down some traits to make them more pet friendly, but this too can lead to issues. Example a guardian breed who defaults to addressing the threat with now excessive timidity (confused for placidity) can create even worse problems than a more confident dog.

    All three of these breeds are very slow to mature and many owners get lulled in to a false sense of security in the first two, three years thinking their happy-go-lucky mastiff will stay that way forever. Then when the dog hits social maturity and loses tolerance for people and dogs and starts going on the offensive, they think there is something wrong and the dog ends up euthanized for simply being the breed he/she was bred to be.

    If you son is that interested in these breeds, I think the best way to learn is to get involved in the breed. Volunteer at a breed-specific rescue, go to shows, meet breeders, handle the dogs himself, earn his stripes if you will.

    As for getting a dog to protect you, that never ends well - really. Dogs live in a human world, a human world who does not take kindly to dogs who take it upon themselves to decide who is a threat and who isn't. Which often ends up being the harmless older person who walks with a limp or the harmless toddler who's wearing a funny looking hat. Not the best idea.
    Dogs make great deterrents, they don't have to be protective on top of that.
     
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  7. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    All was saying was.... that it doesn't matter what breed you have as far as training goes, every dog is different, some dogs will be easier to train than others even within the same breed.
     
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  8. Golu DDB

    Golu DDB PetForums Newbie

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    Been said already, none of these dog breeds are for people who have not either had something similar before or have a ton of experience with dogs generally.

    A 15 yr old child is going to struggle just holding on for dear life if a DDB or a bullmastiff decides it's heading into the bush.
     
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  9. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    I agree but the breeds you mention aren't breed to start with, have thought about a Labrador.
     
  10. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    All 3 are breeds, what are you talking about?
     
  11. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    I read it as not best to start with.
     
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  12. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Oh that makes more sense that way!
     
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  13. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

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    if you want a good family guardian, which is also a good family dog, then go for a border collie or jack russell
    both easily and eager to train, once you tap into what theyll work for - normally toys for both over food
    no way would i consider any of the breeds you mention for a 15yr old anyone, boy or not and especilly NOT a first time owner
    Ive fostered many Cane Corso, from, 6 week pups to 12 yr dogs
    and much as they are my most favourite breed ever, they are not for the faint hearted,
    I did a lot of work with rescue and a breeder, before fostering for both and they are definitley not for a first time guardian breed owner
    bull and englsh mastiffs ive trained and worked with owners once they hit the teenage years and become very hard headed and decide to see if they can get away with ignoring some training
    ( not domination, no dogs want to dominate us, and if you chose domination training techniques, and alpha rolls with any of these breeds, good luck to you, youll need it)
    if one is not clued into the breed, and your dog especially, a well trained dog will bend the boundaries and youll end up with a dog that learns it can ignore you,
    so you need to be talking to local positive only trainers, many( in my area anyway) will not take on large guardian breeds in group classes, and scoping out some positive behaviourists before you need one

    i cant say much about DDB, as although i admire them ive never worked with or fostered one, but agan, most Ive met are big drooly softies, more likely to slob you or any intruder to death than anything else

    I almost get the feeling, from your post, that your 15yr old son is wanting a status, 'ard looking, dog, which is absolutely the wrong reason to get one of these dogs, thats how they get passed from pillar to post
    take him to the local rescue, let him volunteer, and get to know the differring needs of different types of dogs,
    large, small, mutts, pedigree, terriers, lapdogs, guardian breeds, youmg through to old etc, for a few years,
    then have another conversation with him

    one other thing to think of
    hes 15, hes going to be heading into gcse's, college, maybe uni, discover girls, boys or both, want to be out with his mates, work through his moody, rebellious, teenage phase, and all the other things that happen when transitioning from boy to man
    and in those times
    just who is going to be poo picking, feeding and walking the dog, training it, paying its bills ( be aware lots of insurance companies put huge premiums on bull breeds, if they insure them at all, Cane corso is a point in question here) remembering, as a rule of thumb, the bigger the dog, the bigger the injuries and hence the bills

    be a parent here, and tell him when hes done the real dirty, hot, everyday work, not just reading books/internet, and hes an adult, then youll think about it
     
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  14. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Exactly everything that needs to be said has been said already.

    I don’t think you’ve really explained why your son (or you?) have settled for these breeds.

    If your son is disappointed, tell him that real men walk Poodles and Dachshunds because they don’t need props.
     
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  15. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

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    i would fill in your poll
    but
    although you say you are open to other breeds - if so what are your suggestion/s?
    you havent got a box for that
    nor
    do you have a box for none of the above
     
  16. mrs phas

    mrs phas karma is a funny old thing

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    when we had our chi's, my husband would say
    real men walk chi's
    if anyone laughed ( he was 6ft1 and built like a rugby player)
    the other thing is
    I always say, if chis were as big as rotties, theyd be on the banned dog list ( not that i agree with having one)
    they have no idea of their size in relation to anyone or thing else
    remember
    its not the size of the dog in the fight
    its the size of the fight in the dog

    (obviously Im not advocating dogfighting, its just a saying)
     
  17. Animal Freak

    Animal Freak PetForums Member

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    Hello. I can't help with advice on the breeds since I'm not familiar with any of them, but I think that's pretty much already been covered anyway. It would be helpful to know why you want a protective dog and what that means to you. Any dog can bark, so if you want a dog to alert you to someone outside then you can get that just fine in any breed. I have a Chihuahua x Pom who is quite noise sensitive and vocal. Personally, I'd rather she weren't so sensitive.

    However, what I really wanted to bring up was about your son and being so young. It sounds like getting a dog is more his thing. You can correct me if I'm mistaken, but it sounds like he's the one doing the research, picking the breed, and planning on doing the training. So is he going to be responsible for the dog? If so, has he (and you) planned for the future? I'm bringing this up because I found myself in a difficult situation. I got two of my cats when I was around ten, the third when I was around thirteen, and added my dog about a year or so after that. I got them before I started planning for my future, before I had to worry about responsibility. Now I'm in college and figuring my future out. Having animals through all of that is not easy. I can't--and wont--give them up because it's a bit hard, but it's made me have to really think about my choices. Where I go to college, how much it costs, where I can move too, how much travelling I can do, who will watch them when I do travel...

    I'm not saying it's impossible, but it's better to think about it before committing to an animal. If you're going to end up taking care of this dog then it needs to be a breed you can take care of. I would recommend figuring out who will be the primary caretaker first. If it's your son, then what's he going to do later on with school, jobs, etc.? If you're going to end up caring for the dog at that point then it still needs to be a dog you can take care of. Then get into volunteering. Maybe you can foster a dog or two. And maybe consider adopting? You can get a perfectly good mix breed from a shelter and, if you choose to, you can skip the troublesome puppy phase. It's not as much fun as it seems anyway. And do your own research rather than just trusting your son.

    Sorry for the long post, but it's things I didn't think about. I did not know what I was getting into when I got my dog. I grew up with dogs, but was never responsible for one. I wasn't ready. I wasn't prepared. I didn't know what I was doing. Getting her was unplanned and last minute. I love her, but I bit off more than I could chew and now I have to deal with that. And she's not a high energy working dog by any means!
     
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  18. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    This is so on point. @Animal Freak , you describe an excellent example of these issues.
     
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  19. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    And exactly what happened when my friend finally gave in and let her 20 year old son get a dog (a so called “easy” breed by comparison to the 3 in the poll too) while still living with her, despite all his promises.

    She ended up being the main carer and her son had to be reminded constantly of the responsibility and commitment he had taken on and promised to fulfil, and badgered to do his share.

    Sadly, the pup had to be pts around 8 months of age as she had severe, debilitating epilepsy (which was devastating :() and my friend has said no to him even thinking of getting another pup as she doesn’t want the responsibility again which she now knows will fall to her (nor the heartache).
     
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  20. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Excellent points @Animal Freak :)
    I too kept dogs in college (Uni) and it meant my college experience was very different than my peers. It can be isolating, you can't do things you're friends are doing because your dog is the priority. I have always had dogs and used to be an oddball so it worked for me, but one of my roommates also had a dog and I ended up being that dog's main carer as she would leave for days just expecting the rest of us to care for her dog. It was bad. I can't imagine if I had not been there, because the other roommates were totally uninterested in the dog - a rather neurotic American Cocker Spaniel, bless him, given his owner, it wasn't much of a surprise how messed up he was. But yeah, it's not easy doing life as a young person and caring for a dog, even if it's a lifestyle you're already very used to and accepting of.

    At 15 my son was taller than me and definitely stronger.

    That said, I've never subscribed to the idea that the bigger the dog the stronger you have to be. I was a very scrawny child and at that age I was easily handling the stallions in the barn even around mares in season.
    JMO, but if you're relying on strength to control your dog, you've already lost.

    Of course youngsters, yeah, they go brain dead and with all 3 of those breeds there is the juvenile idiot stage to consider. Again, first time owners who are not prepared for the teenage stupids can find themselves overdogged very easily and if you don't have the tools and know-how to handle those situations it can get dangerous very quickly.

    Size does make a difference though. A teenage spaniel vs. a teenage DDB is just two entirely different things.
    We're talking breeds where by 7 or 8 months you're looking at an 80 or 90 pound dog who just getting excited inside the house can cause havoc. Our house and furniture still bears the scars of a teenage great dane who has since crossed the rainbow bridge.
    A teenage spaniel who's happy you've come home might jump up at you and scratch your legs a little. A teenage bullmastiff who's happy you've come home can move furniture, smash it in to walls, knock you over, chip your teeth, or break your nose offering you a toy to play with. Fun times :)
     
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