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Cancer cat: constipation remedy?

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by sarasara, Feb 28, 2008.


  1. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    My cancer cat has constipation and I have been using liquid parrafin as recommended by the vet. Unfortunatly it is not working and I wonder if anyone knows a surefire remedy which is preferably tastless and odorless and can be added to her food?

    I already have to give her prednisone and norocalv tablets (ground with a little marge so she can take them in without cutting her tumour which is where the windpipe meets the stomach pipe) twice a day and dont want to further stress her.

    Hope someone has experience in this,
    Thanks,
    Sara.
     
  2. Siamese Kelly

    Siamese Kelly PetForums VIP

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    So sorry Sara i have no experience (TG) with this matter,so i'd suggest speaking to your vet again-my sincere best wishes for you and your patient:)
     
  3. Saynamore

    Saynamore Banned

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    Also no experience in this area, I can only suggest something like oily fish, maybe mackerel or sardines with all bones removed, to get more oil into the digestive system? At the end of the day, take the vets advice C.x.
     
  4. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    Kind of you to respond but your post is an example of the danger of people who dont know what they are talking about giving advice. A cat with a tumour in its foodpipe is only going to be made worse by eating unprocessed food which is too stringy for them to digest. You dont need to say take the vets advice, thats obvious.
     
  5. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    One of my cats had a tumor just into it's stomach (when I was a lot younger) and the only thing that was given to us from the vets was liquid parrafin. Sadly we didn't find anything that would work and had to have her put to sleep as she really didn't have any quality of life. I would have thought the vet would have given you something to help with the constipation, one of my rescue cats was very constipated when I got him (I know it's different) but the vet gave me some medicine to give to him to help his bowels and soften him up. I hope you manage to find something to help the cat out.
     
  6. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    Thanks Katherna,
    My problem with vets is that I live in a country area where the vets are experts on farm animals and dogs but know very little about cats (though they would never admit it).

    I have since been recommended on another forum; lactulose, which I will give her but it has to be measured with a syringe and then dropped on her food. Also physillium husk powder which I will obtain next time I get to town.

    I am very concerned about the point where she will decline and the huge decision about when or if she is put to sleep.

    There is a false impression created to some extent by the meat industry that animals can be easily 'put down' but actually many cats are terrified of vets; particularly farm ones who arrive covered in smelly rubber from testing cattle, and country surgeries in this part of the world are noisy smelly places. My cat is rescued and is very nervous and sensitive. I don't want her to die in fear.

    Perhaps if her quality of life deteriorates to the point where I feel it is better she goes than I will have to find some way that I can personally administer a sleeping draught and then when she is unconcious call the vet out to end her life.

    I am hoping to get in contact with someone who has nursed a cat with a tumour in the area where the windpipe meets the stomach pipe so that she can benefit from their personal experience.

    regards,
    Sara.
     
  7. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    you can use lactulose on babies it helps soften their poo when they're constipated as well, so hopefully your cat will feel much better (although babies can get flatulance when on it). When our cat had to be put to sleep it was a difficult decision as well, luckily our vet was very gentle and offered to come out to the house to help with the cat. I hope what time you have with her is happy for both of you as it's very upsetting when one of our animals becomes ill.
     
  8. I have to give lactulose to my poorly boy cat - but only drops into mouth with plastic suringe - as there is no way he will eat it with food. We both used to that process - with my left hand I hold him and with right - giving lactulose.........If that will not be possible - he'll be put to sleep - which will be very hard.
     
  9. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    Luckily she seems to take it with the food ok though I have stopped and gone back to liquid parrafin because I don't have a syringe to measure the lactulose.

    Unfortunatly I could'nt give her lactulose orally as she hates getting her twice daily dose of prednisone steroids and quarter of a tablet of noroclav anti-biotics ground up and made into a paste and put in her mouth.

    I am also worried about the end of this and unsure whether to eventually just withdraw all medicine and let her die naturally or administer a sleeping draught and then call the vet out to inject her while she is asleep.

    You are lucky if your vet knows anything about cats. It is better if you live in a populated area where the vets have experience of cats or in the United States where vets are much better trained and more specialised than in Europe.
     
  10. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    A syringe for measuring the lactulose - could you get one of the childrens medicine syringes from a pharmacy? Just a thought, as thats what I've done in the past to get medicine down my animals (if they've needed more than just a couple of mls).
     
  11. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    Good point Katherna, I'll do that. Thanks:) .
     
  12. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    No problem :) it's just one of my drawers in the kitchen has about 10 syringes in there, some are for the dogs, some for the cats, and some for the kids, heehee. If my animals need liquid medicine the vet always give me a syringe, heehee, so I've been collecting them for a few years (plus they're great for water fights in the summer means I don't get drenched).
     
  13. Siamese Kelly

    Siamese Kelly PetForums VIP

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    Responding rightly or wrongly is what breed forums are for as then we can learn and i disagree with your last remark, given some posts on this forum in that it's clear that not everyone speaks to a vet whether a serious matter or not let alone take their advice,so sometimes what may appear to be obvious reason and sense to some,isn't to others:)
     
  14. ABSOLUTELY. We discuss and we learn.
     
  15. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    The big mystery with her is that she used to be a milkaholic and hated water, now she wont look at milk, even the special cat formulas. I have to add a bit of water to her chopped up food. The vets know nothing here and I wonder if milk annoys the tumour in her stomach pipe?
     
  16. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    It might do. One of my cats is a milkaholic, the other cats are allowed a little milk once a week, but my youngest cat will tip over a bottle and break into it if it's left out on the side. She wasn't well when she was a kitten and so she had lactol (think thats what it's called, formula milk for kittens and puppies) so I assume she thinks it's the same stuff. I also remember my mum nursing a feral cat back to health after it'd had a broken jaw, she had to get antibiotics into him somehow so she strained water through some raw mince to make a drink and added the medicine to that, she also added water and mashed mince up for him so he could lap it up (you couldn't catch the cat either, the vet visited when he was at the local farm).
    How is she doing? Also how is she pooping?
     
  17. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    Hi Katherna,
    You know I think that my cat must be an extremly rare case.

    I have searched forums all over the net and documents and cannot find any example of a cat with cancer in the stomach pipe which is pressing on her windpipe and therefore ultimatly threatening her ability to breathe or eat. In fact I cant find any instance of a cat with cancer in the gullet at all.

    It's a problem because the implications for her prognosis are important to know and with no one else having posted to my knowledge about it I can't get the advice and support I'm looking for. Our vets out in the sticks are specialised in farm animals and dogs but know very little about small animals.

    What I do now is to chop her catfood 'chunks in jelly' fine then add a little liquid parrafin and water. So she drinks the water as gravy and so gets liquid into her system. Just what your mum did.

    Rarely she will take a long-distance lick of the water with the very tip of her tongue, as though she is just washing her tongue. But she always looks at the saucer of water with a sort of astonishment as though giving it to her is yet another proof of my insanity! She never drank water even from rainpools.

    She does a good poop every two or three days now but again there must be something in the cancer or the meds that causes constipation and the vet has'nt got a clue.

    The tumour must be irritated by milk and that is why she has turned against it.

    I keep her on a quarter of a tablet of noroclav anti-bio (If I stop alltogether she developes a secondary upper respitory tract infection within 12-24 hours) every morning and evening.

    Of course if she does develope a secondary infection I would step the noroclav up to half a tab morn and night -she particularly hates that drug.

    I give her one and a quarter tablet of predisterone steroids morning and evening to shrink and slow the tumour.

    Her general health is fine at the moment though we are having a wet and windy winter and a bad night can really bring her condition down. I'm having to leave the central heating on 24 hours for her which is really bad for my chest...but's that the fate of mums!
     
  18. Katherna

    Katherna PetForums Senior

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    It could well be the meds that are causing the constipation. My ginger cat had to have high doses of steriods when he was younger and he blew up like a balloon, we had to give him diuretics to try to get rid of the water. I have also had a cat the didn't seem to drink much water, but if you left the tap dripping he'd drink out of the tap (cats are strange sometimes).
    Our cat that had cancer had it in her stomach, you could feel the mass there, I'll ask my mum if the cat was constipated at all as she'd know better than me as I was still a kid so didn't take much notice of those type of habits. I'll also try to find out how long she was happy and had quality of life for, as I think it was quite a while, rather than just a couple of weeks, but it was a fast growing tumour as on her x-rays the mass had grown pretty quickly. Although she had other problems as well as she'd been poisoned when she was a kitten (she'd visited a local farm and caught a mouse or a rat, then some kids had kicked her around, she'd crawled under a neighbours caravan, so she had some brain damage and couldn't balance on a fence but she was a feisty thing and ruled the neighbourhood dogs and cats. With one look the dogs would vacate kennels and cats would run away).
    I hope you manage to find something out about her problem as I think it's worse not knowing rather than having an idea about all the problems that may come.
     
  19. sarasara

    sarasara PetForums Junior

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    The cat is up and down from day to day and even hour to hour. Every time she starts coughing again I increase her meds and I have no idea how long she will live for.

    I think I know the cause. She was a rescued cat who had been starved with her mother in a shed, they ripped her off her mother while she was drinking milk and gave her to me. For a couple of days she was terrified and hid behind furniture but when I eventually did catch her she immediately started to try to drink from my breast instead chewing on my cardigan. This became a comfort blanket for her as she is the most insecure animal I've ever come across. She has to suck on the cardigan a number of times a day and cries and cries till she gets it if its in the wash

    I did some googling on fabric softeners which stay on the fabric after the wash and found they contain seven different carcinogens. So that seems probably to be the likely cause. Now I rinse her 'minkie' well under the cold tap in the bath after it comes from the wash but the damage is done. This is the only way I can account for a cancer which seems so rare that I can find no instances on the Internet or forums; most cancers being in the organs.

    I dont want her to suffer and I have no idea what to do in the future. It is not only damaging her but my health also as I have to leave the cen heating on 24 hours which is bad for my chest (and finances!) and she disturbs me at night which is affecting my studies the next day.

    I wonder if you or anyone knows typically how long cancer cats survive and if anyone has managed to allow theirs to die naturally? A strategy for non intervention of anti-biotics and steroids while instead using painkilling narcotics might be the answer when the time come. She is totally terrified of vets and I would rather she die unthreatened in pain than in terror.
     
  20. Siamese Kelly

    Siamese Kelly PetForums VIP

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    Sara, have you thought about going to a cityvet/city pdsa nearest you.Maybe if you can have a drive out and enquire first without your cat(so as not to distress her)as i'm sure they will have knowledge/experience of this situation and be able to advise you so at least you'll be better fact equipped to make a decision on the best way to go:) As i said i have absolutely no knowledge/experience of this nature so this is what i think i would do:)
     
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