Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Can foxes kill dogs?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Owner of a mad terrier, Aug 22, 2013.


  1. Owner of a mad terrier

    Owner of a mad terrier PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1
    I was out walking my small terrier today in the countryside and saw a huge fox in the field next to us. I've never seen a fox so big! I thought it was an Alsation! It didn't see us and I got my pet corrector can out (something I carry since my dog hs been attacked) just in case!

    I was quite concerned because I know someone whose terrier died from a fox attack and was wondering if foxes normally hunt terriers and would my pet correcter scare it off? What can I do to scare it off?

    Any ideas? :)
     
  2. sezeelson

    sezeelson PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    2,236
    Likes Received:
    46
    Yes they could but not unless they where desperate or threatened by the terrier!

    They are pretty skittish (well most are). If you running at them doesn't scare them then yes the pet corrector will definitely scare them off.

    My sisters old dog (border terrier) was well, it's hard to put into words but basically he will get loose and chase them down, he was never attacked/bitten.
     
  3. Owner of a mad terrier

    Owner of a mad terrier PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1
    I've got a border terrier! I hope she doesn't chase them down!!
     
  4. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    Yes definately fox's are underestimated at the end of the day they are mediam sized most of them and if they are capable of killing a cat a dog small then itself will probably be easy too.
     
  5. sezeelson

    sezeelson PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    2,236
    Likes Received:
    46
    What the prey drive like? Does your terrier chase cats? If so, be extra careful in the evenings/nights when there are known foxes about! Just to be safe!

    I get a group of 4? Out in my front garden every Tuesday night (bin day) and freak out when either dogs pop their heads up at the window. I've never had a chance to test their reaction to the spray as they scarper when I open the door :/
     
  6. Owner of a mad terrier

    Owner of a mad terrier PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1
    I needed reassurance not scaring! Haha! Any suggestions on how to get rid of one?
     
  7. dandogman

    dandogman PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2011
    Messages:
    5,514
    Likes Received:
    80
    I'm very surprised to hear of a fox killing a terrier to be honest. They're feisty little dogs (I've got a Jack) and she would definitely give as good as she got.
     
  8. Owner of a mad terrier

    Owner of a mad terrier PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1
    My terrier chases rabbits but is more curious near cats! I think I'll keep her on a longline in the winter when it's dark and I can't see so well just in case or walk her in the town.
     
  9. Owner of a mad terrier

    Owner of a mad terrier PetForums Junior

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    1
    It was a border terrier that got killed. Borders are the most friendly terriers so that's probably why! Jack Russell's are known to be much more feisty! My. Order won't even kill a fly. That's why I'm worried about her!!!
     
  10. tabulahrasa

    tabulahrasa PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2012
    Messages:
    3,121
    Likes Received:
    1,193
    Well I'm sure they can, but why would they want to?
     
  11. loukodi

    loukodi PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Messages:
    930
    Likes Received:
    154
    A Chihuahua maybe I think a terrier would be unlikely but not impossible.
    It depends where you are as well. Rural foxes would only fight in self defence or if they feel threatened, they are more likely to run. Urban foxes are more bold and opportunistic.
     
  12. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    Sorry :> was saying ^^''

    My neighbour had 4 cats nabbed by fox's so I reckon one desperate enough could get a dog small then itself their very opertunistic.

    Keeping your garden fox free -

    Make sure their is no food in the garden the fox can get at

    keep your bin bags in a wheelie bin as fox's are attracted to bags they like to tear them open.

    Don't let pets like chickens and rabbits free range in the garden without supervission. These are prey animals and easy pickings to a fox.

    Don't leave doors open in the evenings or early morning


    Don't leave anythin appetising to fox's in your garden

    an old wives tail claims that man pee deters fox's

    My nann used to freaze any bones before putting them in the bin and all her neighbours bins were attacked accept hers.

    Human hair is also said deter fox's

    But really it depends how determined they are if their under my window crying out I drop water on them they hate it. If you stumble across one in the park take a squirty bottle:>

    make sure neighbours are not doing any of the above as they will still come.
     
  13. Lauren5159

    Lauren5159 Lover of Terriers, loser of the plot.

    Joined:
    May 28, 2013
    Messages:
    6,462
    Likes Received:
    4,681
    Skip is a Parson Russell, a breed created to hunt fox.

    The were created to be agile enough to keep up with the fox hounds, over any terrain and in all weathers. When the fox ran in to it's den, the parson was bred to be small enough to follow the fox in to the den and either chase it out or drag it out...

    We have a fox that comes in to my mum's garden and when Skip is there, he goes crazy! Screams at it and tries to get to it. The breeders told us that Skip's dad has killed a few foxes that roamed on to their land.

    Foxes freak me out and I would never let Skip get to one but it's pure instinct with him. Being a terrier, I don't think he's give up until he had it.

    It scares me no end but it's hard wired in his brain and I dread to think how far instinct would get him...

    I'll try to find the video of Skip's reaction to a fox and post it.
     
  14. DogLover1981

    DogLover1981 PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,810
    Likes Received:
    851
    I think it would need to be really small dog for a fox to kill it.
     
  15. Meezey

    Meezey Slave to the Black & Tans and the Trundle Bugs.

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2013
    Messages:
    13,417
    Likes Received:
    9,906
    Stop scaremongering.... :rolleyes:

    Most cats can hold their own with foxes, yes it can happen but it's very very rare.. Foxes will normally back down from cats. Unless of course the cats are ill etc... A health fit dog would not really have much issue with a fox.

    Foxes are hunter, why would they risk taking on something that could cause them serious injury leaving them unable to hunt, and then dying of hunger. It would be a pretty desperate fox to take on a health dog or cat :mad2:
     
    noushka05 likes this.
  16. SleepyBones

    SleepyBones Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2011
    Messages:
    947
    Likes Received:
    14
    The chances of a fox attacking carrying out a 'predatory' attack on a dog are highly unlikley, I doubt any cases have ever been reported, however, if a fox feels cornered by a dog & cannot escape it might well bite a dog. Muntjaks if cornered are much more of a serious threat than a fox & they have a very serious bite capacity.
    .
     
  17. lilythepink

    lilythepink PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    6,341
    Likes Received:
    122
    We have resident foxes round and about, never ever had a problem with one with a dog.

    They are here, we hear them at night etc and very very rarely we see them crossing into the woods at the bottom of our field.
     
  18. Meezey

    Meezey Slave to the Black & Tans and the Trundle Bugs.

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2013
    Messages:
    13,417
    Likes Received:
    9,906
    For the OP :

    Not sure where you live but you can find information on urban foxes in most place but they will all pretty much say the same thing :D

    Urban Foxes

    Risks to humans and pets
    In the past few years there have been some reports of attacks on children. Thankfully these are extremely rare. Statistically, the risk that foxes pose is very small indeed. The risk from dangerous dogs is far greater.

    Foxes pose little danger to cats. But, like any other dog, foxes will chase cats. Generally, though, when faced with the claws and teeth of a cat, foxes will back away, knowing they will probably suffer a serious injury in any fight. However, foxes will scavenge the remains of dead cats, but actual evidence of them killing cats is extremely rare. Cats and dogs vastly outnumber foxes and they usually co-exist without any serious problems. But, many fox cubs are killed each year by pet cats and dogs.

    However, small pets, like rabbits and guinea pigs can be taken by foxes. They need to be securely housed to ensure foxes cannot get access to them. Most wire pens are not robust enough to deter a determined fox. Foxes also eat rats and other rodents and can thus help to keep those pests down.
     
  19. Prowl

    Prowl Guest

    Would aggree if I hadn't seen a fox trying to go after a cat (my other neighbours) I heard an all mighty racket and rushed out to see the fuss and found my neighbours cat on the compost bin looking miffed and a fox scurrying away under the fence >.>

    At the end of the day they are opertunists and will get hold of live food when they can get it. Their also known for going into peoples houses and their all ready has been reported cases of fox's hurting babies.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice